Jackie Burns, Tamyra Gray & Matthew Hydzik Join Anthony Rapp in If/Then Tour

first_imgIf you’re ready to see one of Broadway’s biggest new musicals in your own backyard, then you’re in luck! Jackie Burns, who was Tony Award winner Idina Menzel’s standby during the Broadway run of If/Then, Tamyra Gray and Matthew Hydzik will join Anthony Rapp in the national tour of the hit musical. Menzel, along with original cast members Rapp, LaChanze and James Snyder, kicked off the tour in October, performing in Denver, Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles, San Diego, Tempe and Costa Mesa. If/Then will continue to play cities across North America through August 2016.In addition to Burns as Elizabeth and Rapp as Lucas, Gray will play Kate, an elementary school teacher and Elizabeth’s new neighbor, and Hydzik will play Josh, a doctor and army reservist who meets Elizabeth on her first day back in New York City. The production also features Janine DiVita as Anne, Daren A. Herbert as Stephen and Marc de la Cruz as David. The ensemble includes English Bernhardt, Charissa Bertels, Xavier Cano, Trey Ellett, Kyra Faith, Corey Greenan, Cliffton Hall, Deedee Magno Hall, Tyler McGee, Joseph Morales, Emily Rogers, and Alicia Taylor Tomasko.Directed by Michael Greif, If/Then features music by Tom Kitt, with book and lyrics by Brian Yorkey. The writers earned the Tony Award and Pulitzer Prize for penning Next to Normal. If/Then earned Tony Award nominations for Best Original Score and Best Actress (Menzel). The tuner premiered at the National Theatre in Washington, D.C. in November 2013.If/Then is a contemporary new musical that follows two distinct storylines in the life of Elizabeth, a city planner who moves back to New York to restart her life in that city of infinite possibilities. When her carefully designed plans collide with the whims of fate, Elizabeth’s life splits into two parallel paths. If/Then follows both stories simultaneously as this modern woman faces the intersection of choice and chance.Can’t wait to see If/Then in your city? Watch the video below to go behind the music and get into the gorgeous score of the musical! View Commentslast_img read more

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Brooks Winners.

first_img The 2001 D.W. Brooks Award winners are (l-r) Mark Rieger, teaching; Rick Reed, county extension programming; Darrell Sparks, research and Robert Stewart, extension. Photo: Faith Peppers Four University of Georgia faculty members received the prestigious D.W. Brooks award for excellence in public service Oct. 1 in Athens, Ga.The $5,000 annual awards recognize UGA College of Agriculturaland Environmental Sciences faculty who excel in teaching, research, extension and county extension programs. An award for international agriculture is given in even-numbered years.The 2001 winners are Mark Rieger, teaching; Darrell Sparks, research; Robert Stewart, extension; and Rick Reed, county programming.The CAES sponsors the annual lecture and awards in memory of D.W. Brooks, founder and chairman emeritus of Gold Kist, Inc., and founder of Cotton States Mutual Insurance Companies. Brooks was an advisor on agriculture and trade issues to seven U.S. presidents.Michael J. Phillips, executive director of food and agriculture for the Biotechnology Industry Organization, delivered the 2001 D.W. Brooks Lecture, “The Future of Agricultural Biotechnology.” The lecture and awards presentations were in the Mahler Auditorium of the Georgia Center for Continuing Education.Rieger, a horticulture professor, was cited for his innovative approach to teaching. He is highly rated by students and considered a leader in Web-based distance education.In his 14 years as a member of the UGA horticulture faculty, Rieger has earned a local, national and international reputation in horticulture and in his specialty of environmental stress physiology of fruit crops. He has twice been named “Teacher of the Year.”Sparks, a horticulture professor, has researched physiology and management of pecans for 36 years. His research into cyclic production helped revitalize the pecan industry in Georgia and nationwide.The American Society for Horticultural Sciences’ 1998 Outstanding Researcher, Sparks contributed to the pecan industry through his nutrition research. Little was known about pecan nutrition until his pioneering efforts.The findings greatly reduced defoliation of important cultivars, which led to enhanced nut production. Today, growers throughout Georgia and around the world fertilize pecans based on leaf analysis.Stewart is committed to getting results through innovative programming. Soon after he took over the Tifton Bull Evaluation Center in 1983, Stewart began enhancing its national reputation by incorporating new technology to improve buyer decision-making.He developed a computer program that was quickly adopted by farm managers across the country. Stewart also enhanced bull evaluation through documenting genetics for consigners and developing new measurements to add to selection criteria.He received the 1996 distinguished service award from the National Association of County Agricultural Agents, the 1997 Gamma Sigma Delta Extension award of merit and the 2000 outstanding senior scientist award in extension at the Tifton campus.His work has been highlighted in national magazines and by the National Cattlemen’s Association. He also was selected to serve on the performance committee of the International Beef Improvement Federation.Reed has been a member of the UGA Extension Service staff since July 1974. He plays a major role in providing leadership to the $198.5 million agriculture industry in Coffee County.Reed is sought out by growers and researchers for his knowledge and input when they seek practical information on sustainable, ecologically based cropping systems. He is also recognized for helping to develop the Georgia sweet carrot industry and for his major role in developing a new product,Douglas Pride, made from municipal waste.last_img read more

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Seventh Generation partners with Sustainability Academy

first_imgSeventh Generation,Seventh Generation, the nation’s number one green brand, announced a community partnership with the Sustainability Academy at Lawrence Barnes Elementary School in Burlington, Vermont.The nation’s first K-5 school with a sustainability theme, the goal of the Academy is to prepare students to be responsible citizens and agents for change, in their community and beyond. Located a few blocks from Seventh Generation’s headquarters, the school is an international model for using sustainability as a lens for place-based education and service learning. Seventh Generation has participated in a literacy building program at the Sustainability Academy and has provided non-toxic cleaning products for classrooms and teachers. This holiday season, the company will be “adopting” five families of the Academy in need to fulfill the children’s wish lists.Seventh Generation CEO John Replogle announced the partnership while the school unveiled a recently installed alternative energy system, including a solar tracker, funded by a Vermont state grant and in part by Seventh Generation. The system is designed to reduce the school’s carbon footprint while serving as an educational tool for students. An energy monitoring display will facilitate discussions on how to track the school’s progress towards “net zero.””As a pioneer in sustainability, Seventh Generation is uniquely able to help students make the connection between the social and environmental issues we face as a society and the role green business and green chemistry plays helping to address these challenges,” said Replogle. “We couldn’t be more thrilled to partner with the Sustainability Academy to nurture and inspire the next generation of sustainability leaders right here in our own backyard.”In 2012, Seventh Generation plans to donate 880 hours of volunteer time to build an outdoor classroom and natural playground for the Sustainability Academy. The partnership will also include a science ambassador program in which Seventh Generation employees will work with students to understand the connection between personal and environmental health. In addition, the company plans on hosting a book drive with the school to support early literacy and assisting the Sustainability Academy with rebranding efforts.”The students, parents, faculty and staff of the Sustainability Academy are excited about partnering with Seventh Generation. Their commitment to our community is real and personal and their support of the education for sustainability movement is a clear indication that they are focusing on the future now,” said Sustainability Academy principal Brian Williams.ABOUT SEVENTH GENERATIONSeventh Generation is committed to being the most trusted brand of household and personal-care products for your living home. Our products are healthy solutions for the air, surfaces, fabrics, pets and people within your home — and for the community and environment outside of it. Seventh Generation also offers baby products that are safe for your children and the planet. The company derives its name from the Great Law of the Iroquois Confederacy that states, “In our every deliberation, we must consider the impact of our decisions on the next seven generations.” Every time you use a Seventh Generation product you are making a difference by saving natural resources, reducing p ollution, and making the world a better place for this and the next seven generations.For information on Seventh Generation cleaning, paper, baby and feminine personal care products, to find store locations, and explore the company’s website visit www.seventhgeneration.com(link is external). To read more about Seventh Generation’s corporate responsibility, visit the company’s Corporate Consciousness Report. BURLINGTON, VT–(Marketwire – December 06, 2011) –last_img read more

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Drug Challenge Requires Collective Response, Central American Leaders Say

first_img Central American leaders are looking to Washington for assistance in combating drug cartels intent on moving trafficking operations away from Mexico. And the U.S. is responding by sharing intelligence, providing training and tracking drug movements as well as advising on judicial and social programs aimed at confronting corruption, strengthening civilian law enforcement and rebuilding communities. The increasing collaboration between the U.S. and Central American authorities threatens to make it more complicated for major Mexican cartels to escape their own internecine violence and the onslaught from the government of President Felix Calderon. Signs that Mexican traffickers are looking to Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras as “safe havens” attest to the Calderon government’s 2010 successes and suggest that the four-year-long crackdown on Mexican traffickers is beginning to bear fruit. The Calderon crackdown has succeeded in weakening Mexico’s drug cartels, including the preeminent Pacific cartel, Mexico’s Security Cabinet announced in a Christmas message. About 24 percent of all 2010 drug arrests in the country involved members of the Pacific cartel. Record drug seizures and other blows have weakened the criminal organizations, the Security Cabinet said. In response, Mexican criminal gangs such as Los Zetas are searching further south for new operational opportunities. “Drug violence is spilling over the border, as the Mexican government’s tough stand on narco-traffickers pushes notorious organizations like the Zetas southwards,” the U.S. State Department said in a statement in October. Guatemala’s murder rate climbed to 52 homicides per 100,000 inhabitants in 2010, compared with rates of 14 in Mexico and 5.4 in the U.S. More than 10,000 drug-related murders have taken place in Guatemala this year. The country has long functioned as a major transit country for cocaine traveling north. Drugs arrive from production countries in the south and then move overland via Mexico into the U.S. Drug analysts estimate that between 285 and 350 metric tons of cocaine transited Guatemala in 2010. But now with the squeezing of the Mexican cartels on their home territory, the drug challenge for the Guatemalan authorities has increased. The amount of illegal drugs seized in Guatemala doubled between 2008 and 2009, according to the U.S. State Department. “We think drug trafficking is strongly invading Central America,” Guatemala’s President, Alvaro Colom, acknowledged in an interview in November. “When President Calderon is successful, they (the cartels) come here. If we manage to achieve success, they will go to Honduras, but sooner or later, if we don’t hit them all together, they will come back,” he said to BBC News. The Guatemalan leader insists that neither his country nor any of his neighbors can win this fight alone ─ the only way forward is to treat the criminal threat as a regional one. “We were looking at the routes of planes and ships used to smuggle drugs, and it is incredible how Central America is being hit. From Acapulco to Colombia, it’s a severe aggression,” Colom said. Outside experts agree. David Gaddis, chief of operations at the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, said Mexican crime groups are moving into Central American countries “where they feel, quite frankly, more comfortable.” Like Guatemala, El Salvador has witnessed an influx of Mexican criminals – which in turn has sparked turf fighting and a 37 percent jump in 2009 in the country’s murder rate. “The more pressure there is in Mexico, the more the drug cartels will come to Central America looking for a safe haven,” said David Munguía Payes, El Salvador’s defense minister. Mexican traffickers have been setting up bases in Honduras to facilitate drug transportation into Mexico, according to Honduran authorities. In Guatemala, it appears to be the Zetas who are taking the lead. They are reputed to have set up recruitment and training bases and have forced at least one Guatemalan drug family to leave the country. “When you have drug traffickers afraid of other drug traffickers, you know it’s getting pretty bad,” U.S. Ambassador to Guatemala Stephen McFarland told international broadcasters in December. Last year, one of the Mexican cartels sent a message to Guatemalans by leaving several decapitated heads on the steps of the country’s Parliament. Central American leaders have avoided treating the increasing threat from cartels as an exclusively Mexican problem. Instead, they have begun discussion on how to cooperatively address the drug trade as a regional challenge. The $31-billion drug trade amounts to more money than the combined annual defense budgets of all the Central American countries. In response, Central American leaders have called on the U.S. for assistance. Washington has greatly increased its efforts on a broad front in recent months. U.S. Forces have been training a Guatemalan special force tactical strike team and the U.S. Government has donated a number of UH-2 helicopters to help provide essential air mobility. And more intelligence is being shared on drug and cartel movements at a joint interagency task force center known as JIATF-S based in Key West, where members of the U.S. military, the DEA, Customs and Border Patrol and the Coast Guard work with representatives from Central American countries. But the U.S. has offered more than a military response. In Guatemala, the U.S. Embassy and the United States Agency for International Development have helped the government to establish 24-hour drug courts to process the large number of cases stemming from cartel violence. The U.S. has also assisted in setting up a model police precinct in one of Guatemala City’s most violent suburbs, Villa Nueva. Community outreach programs in the suburb have encouraged locals to tip off the police about drug activity. The U.S. has also provided funding and advice on improving security at border crossings with Mexico. Violence increases U.S. steps upcenter_img “Plan Central America?” By Dialogo January 31, 2011 Costa Rican President Laura Chinchilla has urged U.S. and Central American leaders to talk about a more comprehensive collective approach, with an anti-drug plan tailored for the region. Chinchilla calls her program “Plan Central America.” The initiative would in many ways resemble the multiyear, multibillion-dollar Merida Initiative launched by George W. Bush in 2007 and expanded by President Obama, but with a greater focus on Central America. “We don’t want to be seen as an appendix of the Merida Initiative,” Chinchilla said. Central American leaders agree they won’t win the fight against the cartels without first defeating official corruption and lowering poverty rates. Guatemala’s President Colom said his country’s poverty creates a breeding ground for cartels to recruit locals into their ranks. “If you don’t have social programs, these narcos have the communities on their side,” he said.last_img read more

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Mastic Beach Hit-and-run Driver Sought

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Suffolk County police are looking for a hit-and-run driver that critically injured a 37-year-old pedestrian in the victim’s hometown of Mastic Beach on Tuesday morning.Officers responded to a 911 call of a pedestrian lying in a wooded area on the side of Mastic Beach Road near the corner of Longfellow Drive, where they found Michael Walstrum had been struck by a vehicle at 9:40 a.m., police said.Walstrum was taken to Brookhaven Memorial Hospital Medical Center in East Patchogue, where he was listed in critical condition.Investigators believe the vehicle is a metallic blue with front-end damage and front passenger side body damage that fled southbound on Mastic Beach Road.Vehicular Crime Unit detectives are continuing the investigation and ask anyone with information about the crash to contact them at 631-852-6555 or call anonymously to Crime Stoppers at 1-800-220-TIPS. All calls will be kept confidential.last_img read more

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Memo to credit unions: Here comes Apple

first_img 14SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Apple wants to own your members’ wallets.If you didn’t think Apple Pay was just the beginning, maybe a quick historical refresher will put things into perspective. Remember when the only carrier you could purchase an iPhone from was Cingular (Now AT&T)?  Believe it or not, that was 2007. It was contract exclusivity and it lead to tactics such as ‘jailbreaking’ and ‘bricking’: People wanted the iPhone, but not on AT&T’s network. Some experts believe Apple’s exclusive contract with AT&T was a trillion dollar blunder; did they realize there was more at stake than just money? Through this exclusive five year contract Apple received $10 from every iPhone customer’s AT&T bill and access to AT&T’s ‘backbone’ (this is the key).  AT&T received roughly 10% of iPhone sales from their stores and a small piece of iTunes revenue. Fast forward to the end of the 5 year contract. In 2012, Apple introduced iOS 5, which came with the mobile industry’s first WIFI text platform that was free from cellular network data costs – iMessage. This feature allowed anyone with an iPhone to send and receive messages even when they didn’t have a data connection by using WIFI. Today, iMessage is as popular in iOS 9 as it was when first introduced in 2012 and has led to Apple’s Multipeer Connectivity Framework, which can be used for everything from collaborative editing and file sharing, to multi-player gaming and sensor aggregation.Apple announced Apple Pay in September 2014 with exclusive deals with the three major payment networks: American Express, MasterCard and Visa.  The joint project began in January 2013.  I don’t need to give you the history lesson on Apple Pay… it’s only a year old and you know the story.  The question the credit union industry should be asking, with the understanding of a little history of how Apple leveraged its relationship with AT&T to create iMessage is: ‘What is Apple up to now?’ continue reading »last_img read more

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Year of regulatory relief yields real results

first_imgA year ago, I presented an ambitious agenda for regulatory relief. With the good news that credit unions’ performance metrics had returned to pre-financial crisis levels, NCUA moved to modernize many regulations to provide credit union executives and boards greater discretion.A year later, I am pleased to report that 2015 was, in fact, a year of regulatory relief. Here’s what we did:Eliminated Fixed Assets CapThe NCUA Board eliminated federal credit unions’ 5 percent cap on fixed assets. In the process, we removed the need to apply to NCUA Regional Offices for waivers of fixed asset purchases. Federal credit unions are now empowered to make their own business decisions about purchasing land, buildings, office equipment, and technology.Pre-Approved AssociationsA majority of the NCUA Board voted to pre-approve 12 categories of associations for federal credit unions’ fields of membership:Alumni associations;Athletic booster clubs;Chamber of Commerce groups;Electric cooperatives;Ethnic organizations;Fraternal organizations;Homeowners’ associations;Labor unions;Occupational organizations;Parent-teacher associations;Religious organizations; andScouting groups.Federal credit unions can now apply to add any of these 12 categories of associations automatically. In addition, federal credit unions can still apply to add any other associations manually.Resolved Consumer ComplaintsNCUA’s Office of Consumer Protection changed the agency’s approach to handling complaints received from federal credit union members. Federal credit unions now have 60 days to resolve each issue with their members before NCUA decides whether or not to independently investigate the complaint.Enhanced Attractiveness of Secondary CapitalFor low-income credit unions, we enhanced attractiveness of secondary capital with a more flexible policy for investors. Investors can now call for early redemption of portions of secondary capital that low-income credit unions no longer need.Extended Regulatory FlexibilityA majority of the NCUA Board also voted to raise the asset threshold for small credit unions to $100 million. This means three of every four credit unions are eligible for regulatory flexibility consideration in future rulemakings.2016—A New Year of Regulatory ReliefOur ambitious agenda carries on in 2016. During the first half of this year, we’ll be working diligently to finalize two of our most significant regulatory relief proposals from 2015.Removing Business Lending LimitsIn 2015, the NCUA Board proposed removing non-statutory limits on member business lending. The proposed rule is designed to:Empower credit unions to write their own business loan policies and set their own limits under the law;Eliminate the personal guarantee requirement and the need for regulatory waivers; andRemove unnecessary barriers on business loan participations which help credit unions diversify risks.We’re planning to finalize our new member business lending rule early this year. Then instead of adhering to prescriptive regulatory limits, NCUA will issue guidance on sound commercial lending principles.Expanding Fields of MembershipWe’ve already received nearly 2,000 comments on the NCUA Board’s comprehensive proposal to expand field of membership options for community charters and occupational charters. Among other improvements, the proposed rule would:Designate each Congressional District as a well-defined local community;Include Combined Statistical Areas with populations up to 2.5 million;Raise potential membership to 1 million for federal credit unions in rural areas;Extend membership eligibility to honorary discharged veterans, contractors, and businesses in industrial parks;Recognize full-service websites and electronic applications as service facilities for select employee groups; andModernize the definition of “underserved area.”The proposed field of membership rule is open for comments through Feb. 8.Supplemental CapitalFor complex credit unions without a low-income designation, we intend to propose a rule that would authorize supplemental capital to count toward risk-based capital in 2019.More Relief in StoreIn addition, through March 22, ten safety and soundness rules and five procedural rules are also still open for comments.Some of our best ideas for regulatory relief have come directly from credit union officials, volunteers and stakeholders. So as we begin this new year of regulatory relief, I look forward to receiving more of your suggestions. 11SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Debbie Matz Debbie Matz was nominated by President Barack Obama to serve as the eighth board chair of the National Credit Union Administration (NCUA). After confirmation by the U.S. Senate on … Web: www.ncua.gov Detailslast_img read more

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Leadership development lessons we’ve learned from cartoons

first_img 94SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Nick Davis Nick Davis is a Business Psychologist and Director at Davis Associates, a Surrey-based HR consultancy in the UK. Davis Associates works with companies of all sizes to inspire greater individual, … Web: davisassociates.co.uk Details If you’re looking to improve your leadership capability, you’re most likely seeking advice and inspiration from a number of sources. You might be spending hours reading compelling business leader biographies. You may be networking with opinion leaders on LinkedIn and using them as a source of knowledge. You might also look into executive coaching, a tactic recommended by many, including Forbes Magazine. All of these are advisable and valuable ways to up your leadership game and help you achieve your potential.Sometimes, however, leadership lessons come out of left field. The most unexpected of sources can provide value and help you to become the leader you envision yourself developing into. Even certain popular children’s cartoons can be a wealth of knowledge when it comes to inspiring others, motivating positive behavior, and leading a team. So, perhaps our parents were wrong and those hours spent in front of the TV were not at all a waste of time!Below are just a few examples of cartoons that instill valuable leadership lessons.X-Men teaches us to embrace and capitalize on individual strengthsThe X-Men are, of course, based on a comic book series, but the cartoonized version is immensely popular and can teach us a lot about teamwork and leadership.X-Men centers on Professor Xavier’s School for Gifted Youngsters. Charles Xavier leads a diverse group of characters, all with conflicting personalities, preferences, and motivations. Although Xavier has the ability to control whoever he wants, his leadership style is to give everyone freedom and autonomy. He knows the right way to inspire loyalty is to allow his team to be themselves and work in their own way.Xavier appreciates his students for their unique, individual strengths. He makes room for their development and encourages them to become great in their own authentic way. This technique has regularly been shown to be effective, with Gallup revealing that employees who make full use of their strengths outperform those who don’t. Great leaders should build a strengths-based culture. They are supportive and give people room to grow. This is what we’ve learned from Xavier: strict authority figures are far less effective than a coach who can guide you, but not control you.Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles teaches the importance of conflict resolution and humilityTMNT has been around for a while, and children love it because the turtles make such a great team. Even when they’re at odds with one another, they learn to set aside their differences and work together to achieve their joint goals. They’re honest, open, and effective — the show being a treasure trove of valuable leadership knowledge. They have a leader in the form of Master Splinter, who appears to have put forth Leonardo as a participant in his very own leadership development program. Splinter is far from being an anonymous leader; he’s always on hand to give advice, communicate, and coach. Importantly, however, Splinter also knows how to encourage his team to discover the answer for themselves.The problem the turtles often encounter is interpersonal conflict. This is inevitable; they’re brothers, after all. As the older brother, Leonardo often has difficulty trying to control Raphael. Splinter teaches Leonardo that arguing amongst a team is a huge waste of time, and that communication is necessary for peaceful conflict resolution. Simultaneously, Splinter lets Leonardo know that, as a leader, he might not always be appreciated:“Leadership is not about being appreciated, it’s about responsibility. It doesn’t matter that the burden is heavy. It matters that you carry it”.This quote shows us that leadership is not for everyone. In a position of leadership, you won’t always feel valued or appropriately recognized, but you’ve still got a huge amount of responsibility and you need to carry on regardless. Rather than focusing on yourself in such circumstances, leaders should keep their eye on the prize — the overall goal that the team is working towards.The Lion King shows us that leaders aren’t born; they developThe Lion King has a special hold over a lot of us. It’s hardly a new movie, but children today can still watch it on loop, fascinated by the story, the colors, and the music. When you look at it from a managerial perspective, you will also notice some more subtle messages regarding leadership and development.Simba was born a prince, and so born into a position of future leadership responsibility. However, his ascension to the throne isn’t so clear-cut.When growing up he sings about what he believes leadership is about – exerting power over others and demanding compliance. However, after disaster struck and he went into self-imposed exile, he was forced to mature, both physically and mentally. Through his struggles, he developed intelligence, courage, and kindness. He had to spend time away from his pride to truly understand his position and influence. And as a result, he ultimately proved to be a remarkable leader.Scar is another example of how you simply can’t be born into leadership. Though he was next in line to the throne before Simba was born, we learn that his leadership style left a lot to be desired. He was egocentric, selfish, and short-sighted; a terrible recipe for a leader. He only cared for his own position and for glory and paid little to no attention to his own responsibilities.It’s clear that we have a lot to learn from animation, and that leadership lessons are all around us. So perhaps instead of dissuading our children from indulging in another TV show or movie, we should instead engage them in worthwhile conversations about people management, teamwork and furthering both their and our own leadership potential.last_img read more

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‘It’s like the Pentagon’: New ministry’s control center to improve agriculture data collection

first_img“So this room will be like the Pentagon in the United States. We wage ‘the war’ from here,” added Syahrul, referring to the US Department of Defense headquarters building.The AWR will help provide more accurate data as the ministry has long dealt with data that conflicts with data from Statistics Indonesia (BPS) and agricultural associations. The differences oftentimes trigger debates about whether or not Indonesia needs to import certain agriculture products.Coordinating Maritime Affairs and Investment Minister Luhut Pandjaitan, Agrarian and Spatial Planning Minister Sofyan Djalil and House of Representatives Commission IV chairman Hasan Aminuddin, among other officials, also attended the launch.”If this is managed well, we won’t have to make a fuss over rice imports or any other imports,” Luhut said. Topics : The Agriculture Ministry rolled out on Tuesday a new control center dubbed the Agriculture War Room (AWR) to better track data and survey crop productivity.The AWR monitoring system will generate information on paddy fields, the fertilizer supply and harvest areas using advanced technologies like satellites, the Internet of Things (IoT) and artificial intelligence.”With this instrument, we want agriculture to be more advanced, independent and modern to attain satisfying results,” Agriculture Minister Syahrul Yasin Limpo said during the system’s launch.last_img read more

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