Olympia Arts Walk XLIV 2012 – Friday, April 27 from…

first_imgArts Walk is sponsored by the City of Olympia Parks, Arts & Recreation Department and Olympia Arts Commission, with support provided by Art House Designs, Capitol City Press, Heritage Bank and MIXX 96fm.  Arts Walk maps are available after April 14 at participating locations, Olympia City Hall, 601 4th Ave. East and The Olympia Center, 222 Columbia St. NW.  For more information, contact Olympia Parks, Arts & Recreation at 360/753-8380. As day reaches into night, Arts Walk brings together over 120 businesses, hundreds of visual and performing artists with over 30,000 visitors as they welcome the arts in all forms during this twice-yearly event.  Literary and performing arts share the limelight with paintings and sculpture. Meet artists from all career levels: pre-school through professional.  Listen to a variety of live music including jazz, classical, folk acoustic, bluegrass, blues and rock & roll.  Learn to swing dance, or attend performances from Middle Eastern Dance to martial arts.  Check out “Poetry From the Heart”, storytelling and classic car design.  Take in impromptu street performances, and of course, exhibition of fine art from photography, painting and drawing to sculpture, glass, fiber, ceramics, printmaking and more.  Always new and different, Arts Walk events and activities reflect the interests of a community dedicated to the role of art in their lives.  The festival also includes the spectacular Procession of the Species, an artistic and environmental celebration presented by Earthbound Productions, a colorful and joyous street pageant using the languages of art, music and dance to inspire cultural appreciation, understanding, and protection of the natural world;  the Procession begins at 4:30pm on Saturday.  Due to the popularity of the Procession, cars parked in the route will be towed after 2pm on Saturday, April 28.  Drivers are advised to pay attention to street signage.  Arts Walk is the largest festival of this type in the region – an unparalleled opportunity to embrace the arts and meet the artists. Pollinators, by artist Susan Aurand, adorns the cover of the Arts Walk map this spring, constructed with oil on board.  Her work is strongly influenced by her passion for nature and philosophical inquiry into symbols, metaphor, memory and consciousness.  Susan has exhibited regionally, nationally and internationally with numerous solo and group exhibitions spanning from 1977 to present.  Her work is included in several public and private collections.  Susan received her graduate training in studio art from Ohio State University.  She has been a Professor of Art at The Evergreen State College since 1974.  Susan’s work can be seen during Arts Walk at Childhood’s End Gallery, located at 222 4th Ave NW. Facebook171Tweet0Pin0Photos by Lonnie Paul, courtesy of the Olympia Camera ClubCelebrate the creative and spirited arts community of Olympia as Arts Walk XLIV takes to the streets of the city’s historic downtown.  Tucked into a valley at the foot of South Puget Sound, Olympia is the state’s Capital, and also home to a vibrant mix of musicians, filmmakers, writers and visual and performing artists.  Dates for the event are Friday, April 27 from 5-10pm and Saturday, April 28 from Noon-8pm. Photos by Lonnie Paul, courtesy of the Olympia Camera Clublast_img read more

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Timberland Reads & Writes Together in 2015

first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by Timberland Regional LibraryOlympia’s Carnegie Library, as seen in this historic postcard, was the pride of the community when it opened in 1914. Courtesy Private Collection.Celebrating and supporting creative talent in Southwest WashingtonThe selected book for next October’s Timberland Reads Together (TRT) program doesn’t yet exist. It will be written and designed locally, between January 1 and March 31, 2015 by talented residents in the five county region served by the Timberland Regional Library (TRL). It will become the Timberland Writes Together Anthology.In the old days, public libraries had one simple mission: to collect, care for (curate) and make freely available to all citizens as many printed books and documents as possible. Hundreds of years later, libraries still collect and curate, but in addition, they have become powerful creative forces, inspiring and supporting new artistic, intellectual and cultural expression.In this spirit, the selected writers and cover artist will not only be guaranteed an audience during the month-long community reading program, they will be paid at fair market rate for their work.Local writers and artists may submit short fiction and cover art beginning January 1, 2015. Details are available at www.TRL.org under the “Program” headingStories should be between 2,000-8,000 words in length and should reflect a sense of optimism. They may be of any genre, set in the past, present, or future, and may contain dark elements, but in the main, should inspire a sense of hope.All programs at Timberland libraries are free and open to the public.last_img read more

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RFH Looks Into Replacing Wooden Grandstand

first_imgBy Christina JohnsonRUMSON – Rumson-Fair Haven Regional High School officials say it’s time to say goodbye to the home team’s aging wooden grandstand, and replace it with a new aluminum one.The district is seeking bids to build a new stadium seating system and press box at Two River Times Field behind the high school at 74 Ridge Road.“It’s not an issue of safety; it’s not going anywhere,” said Superintendent Pete Righi. Instead, he said it’s more about solving the cyclical problem of replacing the weatherboards about every 10 to 15 years. It’s time again.“All you need to do is sit on them – they are splintering. The wood is cracking, the wood is getting beat up. It probably is a safety issue as far as splinters go,” he said, with a worried laugh.Business administrator Frank Gripp said the grandstand replacement is part of the district’s long-range plan for improvements but not necessarily “a must-do” item this year. The exterior brick-and-block exterior encasing the seating system, probably installed in the 1940s, will also be replaced with a similar style that can be utilized for storage.Looking through the side window of the Press Box, which will also be part of the upgrade plan.The new press box will have sections for the coaching staffs of the home and visiting team, separated by an announcer’s booth. There will also be a coaches’ platform on the roof so the team leaders can have a bird’s eye view of the turf field. The sound system will not be replaced.At this time, the district is not looking to replace the visitor’s wooden grandstand across the turf field. The seating was replaced in 2008 and is not in need of repair, said officials.Outside of athletic events, the school has also held graduations and occasional community fairs at the venue.Gripp acknowledged that soft wooden floor, steps and purple benches have been a distinctive tradition at RFH’s Borden Stadium for many years. “But we’re at the point now where nostalgia is getting very expensive,” he said.last_img read more

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Wig Warriors Comes to Red Bank

first_imgLawson doesn’t just address the obvious hair loss fromthe head. She can also help with remedies for thinning andloss of eyebrows and eyelashes, including eyeliners, browliners, powders and stencils, among other options. “It’s a tough road navigating through the side effects of chemotherapy,” she said, “but in the end the hair does grows back.” RED BANK – When Michele Lawson’s stepmother battled cancer she remembers the anxiety over the unknown effects her treatment would have on her body, both inside and out, including the potential loss of her hair. Wig Warriors was founded to help patients deal with the often traumatic, but sometimes overlooked side effects of cancer treatments. Chemotherapy drugs are powerful medications that attack rapidly growing cancer cells and unfortunately also attack other rapidly growing cells in the body, including those in the hair roots. Physicians deal with the nausea and potential for infections arising from the treatment, but don’t offer much support for hair loss, a non life-threatening side effect. “We help women navigate through the cosmetic side effects they will endure while going through treatment,” Lawson said. Wig Warriors offers each patient a free wig plus free wig services during treatment, along with a consultation to set up a plan of action to help deal with the difficulties clients may face during their treatment. Wig Warriors, housed at Hair & Co. salon in Red Bank, provides wigs, hair coverings and beauty tips at no cost to women undergoing cancer treatment. Photo courtesy Wig Warriors In a private room in Lawson’s salon, stocked with donated wigs, scarfs, head wraps and head coverings, Lawson meets with women undergoing radiation and chemotherapy. In this safe haven she discusses what they may experience, guides them through the stages of hair loss, and explains the options available to them, including pre-emptive hair cutting and shaving, as well as fitting, styling and caring for wigs. “When you look your best, you feel better,” says Lawson, who has volunteered with the American Cancer Society’s Look Good, Feel Better program that teaches beauty techniques to people with cancer. “I started volunteering when our stepmom was suffering through her diagnosis in 2001 and I needed to help in some way and I started fitting and styling wigs for cancer patients.” By Judy O’Gorman Alvarez Now much of Lawson’s family is involved, includingher sons Luke, Kyle and Peter who sit on the foundation’sboard of directors. Now Lawson, a hair stylist and salon owner, has launched Wig Warriors: The Maureen S. Konopko Foundation in honor of her stepmother who sadly passed away from the disease. On Nov. 18 friends, supporters and the Red Bank community kicked off the nonprofit at her salon Hair & Co. on White Street. On any given day Lawson could be shaving a client’s head, discussing the best wig or head scarf options for another woman or coloring another client’s hair that hasstarted to grow back. “I helped one client transition into awig and start her hair loss journey from the difficult taskof shaving her head to discussing wig care and head wrapsand coverings,” Lawson said.last_img read more

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Will Offshore Wind Farms Come Near Bayshore Region?

first_img“Today we have taken another important step forward into our 100 percent clean energy future,” said Joseph L. Fiordaliso, NJBPU president. “With today’s award of 1,100 MW of offshore wind, a safer, healthier future for New Jersey is looking brighter and closer than ever.” The lease on a Raritan Bay site was signed in March 2017 by the Norwegian organization Equinor, which proposes a pizza-slice-shaped wind farm on 80,000 acres of federal waters. The tip of the slice is located 19.5 miles off the coast of Sandy Hook and 14 miles away from Jones Inlet on Long Island. Clean Ocean Action executive director Cindy Zipf said Murphy’s goal is one worth pursuing, but only if projects in coastal waters are done responsibly. Ørsted anticipates construction will begin in 2022 or 2023. The first power would be produced and circulated in 2024 in cooperation with PSEG Power. In a media release, the Murphy administration said the Ørsted project, titled Ocean Wind, is expected to power an estimated 500,000 New Jersey homes and generate $1.17 billion in economic benefits, in addition to creating an estimated 15,000 jobs over the life of the project. Through a recent announcement, Atlantic Highlands environmental commission chair Jim Krauss said he believes it was six years in the making. “We spent a day at Monmouth University explaining to these federal officials where people were fishing, sailing, surfing, etc.,” Krauss said. “They were trying to determine where they could put this wind farm so it wouldn’t conflict with any of the ocean users.” In June the administration of Gov. Phil Murphy made a splash at the shore when the state board of public utilities approved a $1.6 billion wind farm 15 miles off the coast of Atlantic City. Krauss said the officialshe spoke to were veryconcerned about projectsnegatively impacting thestate’s multibillion dollartourism and commercialfishing industries. Krauss said six years ago he and other environmental stewards, maritime professionals and recreational fishing leaders participated in a study led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory under an interagency agreement with the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Ocean Energy Management. center_img Preceding this announcement was the May launch of the New Jersey Offshore Wind Supply Chain Registry, which allows companies, technical professionals and contractors to indicate their interest and offer their abilities to supply components and services for the offshore wind projects in New Jersey’s coastal waters and along the entire Eastern Seaboard. Murphy called the board of public utilities announcement “historic” and said it will “revolutionize the offshore wind industry in New Jersey and along the entire East Coast.” Local environmental officials say the rippling waves of that announcement could soon be felt in the Bayshore region, with two additional rounds of wind farm application approvals to come in the next three years and a site situated near Sandy Hook and New York already eyed for development. New Jersey Economic Development Agency CEO Tim Sullivan said the Ørsted project and the creation of the registry “represent a major milestone toward our goal of becoming the capital of the American wind industry.” If the proposal is adopted Equinor estimates construction will begin at some point between 2022 and 2023, with the first power available in 2024 or 2025. Estimates have the project powering 1 million New Jersey homes. “They basically told us, ‘we’re not here to tell you where we think they could be placed, we’re here to find out from you where they shouldn’t be.’ It was encouraging to hear because we’ve seen wind farms placed along fishing channels in Copenhagen and they can be a big annoyance,” Krauss added. The first project in Murphy’s three-part plan to generate 3.5 gigawatts of wind energy by 2030 was awarded to the United States branch of Ørsted, a Danish power company that proposed a 1.1 gigawatt project in Atlantic City waters. It is the largest offshore wind project ever awarded in the country. The next two projects call for even larger developments, soliciting 1.2 gigawatt constructions. “We want to work toward ensuring while we move ahead with this industrial but green energy use, that it’s done with respect and protection to our ocean. We need to make sure that during the process that marine life is not compromised and the implementation is as green as possible. Where exactly will they be built? How will they be moved? What exactly will the impact be? These are things we need to know,” Zipf said. last_img read more

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Nelson’s Samuel Matthew medals at WAVES event

first_imgNelson’s Samuel Matthew did not look out of place cooking with the big dogs in Victoria as the TRAX SwImmer medals in all his event final swims at the WAVES event.Matthew took gold in the 50, 100 and 200 meter breaststroke events while setting new meet records during the 50 & 100 meter preliminary morning swims at the Commonwealth Games Pool.Matthew has worked really hard to improve his breast stroke technique and training habits under the direction of head coach Bill Park and it has paid off — he is a Provincial Breast Stroke qualified swimmer and has what it takes to make it to the Age Group National level in the sport of competitive swimming in Canada. Matthew also won Gold in the 100m Free and silver in the 400m Individual Medley and 50m & 200m Free events and bronze in the 100m Back and 100m Fly.TRAX Swimmer Ian Markus (12 years) took first place in the 1500m Free and 50m Free events which qualify him to swim at the Provincial Long Course Meter Championships in Victoria in July 2014 setting new Meet Records in both events.  Markus also won second in the 100 Free, 100 Fly and his 200m Fly swim also qualified him for AAA LCM Provincial Championships, Ian came third in the 100 Back and 400m Free and sure learned how to ride those tough waves.    TRAX distance  swimmer Jackson Konkin (13yrs) finished first in the 1500m Free achieving the AAA qualifying standard; second in the 50m Back final and third in the 100m Free and the  200m Back with AAA QT swims.Konkin was also fourth in the 400m Free, 200m IM  and 100m Back events and 5th in the 400m IM.  Riley Mager (15) had sixth and eighth-place finishes in the tough 15 & older category to help our boys team to a third place finish overall.Brianne Mager (10 years) competed in her first event final, the 200m Back and placed seventh scoring important TEAM points while Tess Markus  also placed seventh 7in the 50 meter backstroke event.BC Summer Games prospects, Cyan Ross-Van Meirlo, Kira Konkin, Kayla Fraser all tried their first 1500 meter freestyle event long course meters and competed in the 400m Individual Medley event achieving the Provincial A time standard.  Noelle Mager competed in her first 1500m swim and Makenzie Mager (10 years) for achieving top TRAX time in the 200m Breast and Free events!For more information on our quality competitive swim programs contact programdirectortwsc@outlook.comlast_img read more

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Bombers rolling along on High School Girl’s Basketball circuit

first_imgThe L.V. Rogers Bombers have been rolling along, thank you very much, on the Kootenay High School Senior Girl’s Basketball scene.The Bombers won a pair of tournaments in the East Kootenay, capturing bragging rights in Kimberley at the Selkirk Storm event and Creston, at Prince Charles. According to head coach Chris Dergousoff, “closest game was 15-point victory . . . many were much more.”The Bombers travel to Castlegar Friday to compete in the Rockers Invitational.The tournament is a precursor for the East/West Kootenay Championships set for February 21-22, also in Castlegar at Stanley Humphries.The Bombers are looking to get back to the provincials for the first time since 2010.last_img read more

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NYS hosts Terry Walgren Rep Soccer Tournament

first_imgThe Lakeside Pitches will be filled with excitement as the Nelson Youth Soccer hosts the annual Terry Walgren Tournament beginning Friday.Teams from Creston, Fernie, Invermere, Cranbrook and Camore join the host Nelson Selects for three days of action.The tournament kicks off Friday with a few games. Saturday is a full slate of games before the tourney concludes Sunday with divisional finals.All action is set for the Lakeside playing fields.There is also a U12 Jamboree set for Lakeside at the same time as the Terry Walgren Tournament.The tournament is in honour of Terry Walgren, a longtime coach in Nelson — who skippered teams in Nelson Youth Soccer as well as men’s and women’s teams.Walgren, a graduate of Nelson Youth Soccer, played high school and men’s league soccer before going off to university where played for Simon Fraser and University of Alberta in Edmonton.Walgren, who returned to coach in the NYS rep program along with playing men’s league, died of cancer.last_img read more

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