BAVO hosts midterm candlelight yoga session

first_imgAs midterm week continues, the Saint Mary’s Belles Against Violence Office (BAVO) planned a restorative and healing event for the students. A candlelight yoga session took place in Angela Athletic Center, open to all students who wished to participate and take a break from the stress of the week.Junior Emily Scott — who took a medical leave of absence before returning to the College — has been with BAVO since 2015, serving as an ally and student advisory committee (SAC) member. Scott said the event was intended to be rejuvenating. “During brainstorming we came up with some uplifting events because the topics are pretty heavy. I thought of candlelight, restorative, trauma-informed yoga to kind of go back to BAVO,” Scott said. “During my medical leave I did a lot of restorative trauma-informed yoga and that was probably one of the biggest parts of my healing, so I wanted to kind of bring something like that back to Saint Mary’s with me.”Scott said yoga is a calming practice, one that BAVO wants to fully take advantage of in their list of events planned for the year. “We thought of timing of the year and that probably the most stressful time would be midterms and finals. So each semester we have two yoga sessions,” she said.The next BAVO candlelight yoga session is scheduled to take place in December around finals week.This midterm session was led by Kimmy Troy, a 2000 Saint Mary’s alumna who frequently teaches yoga classes in the Angela Center. She led the hour-long candlelight yoga session, helping students to release the anxiety that builds around midterm week.First-year graduate student Jessica Purvis, who has also been a BAVO ally and SAC member since 2015, said the event could help students heal from the stress and anxiety of the week.“I feel like yoga is a secular thing so you can involve a lot more people and Kimmy did a great job of making it a healing and restorative type of event. You don’t have to have gone through a traumatic event to get something out of it,” she said. “We’re college students, we all have things that we need to heal from regardless of what it is. It’s a safe place, you don’t need to have experience, that was my first time doing yoga.”With candles dotting the room, relaxing music playing over the speakers and hot tea provided after the session, the BAVO event had students leaving feeling relaxed, restored and ready to finish the week.“It was a great break from all the stress of the week,” sophomore Jade Adomako said. “I had a great time just stopping everything for an hour and recollecting myself. You don’t realize how caught up you get in your stress until you take a step back.”Tags: BAVO, saint mary’s, yogalast_img read more

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J.P. Harris Old School Country

first_imgJ.P. Harris and his country road show keep alive  the traditions of a grand musical genre.Three things strike me about J.P. Harris – his beard, which is big, the rich timbre of his voice, and his commitment to the traditions of the Golden Age of country music. Not even thirty years of age, J.P. Harris and his band, The Tough Choices, are criss crossing the highways and byways of this country – they have played from coast to coast in just the last couple months – playing music that is three plus decades old. J.P.’s music is pedal steel and cigarette smoke, chicken wire and scuffed bar room floors, not the processed pablum that dominates modern country radio.  J.P. just released his first record, I’ll Keep Calling, and Trail Mix features the title track this month.  I recently caught up with J.P. to chat about the new record and good country music.BRO – At its core, what makes a great country song?JP – It’s funny that you would ask that, as I was just thinking about this while driving around Nashville the other day. I was thinking that the thing that catches everybody about country music is the emotion that is imparted in it. Excitement, crazy wildness, love, anger, despair – there is this whole array of emotion that draws people to country music. And the key to making a good country song is making it simple. It’s kind of like being a preacher man; you have to take a complex emotional concept and simplify it so anyone can access it and understand it. That is truly what is at the heart of a good country songwriter and a good country song. I like to think of a good country song as real good, simple sermon for the people.BRO – Who are your country heroes?JP – The singers and songwriters that I have listened to the most and that have really influenced me are George Jones, Del Reeves, and Merle Haggard. Those three have always had a really good mix of irony, sarcasm, and a good grasp of their singing and how they can pierce a heart with an arrow – how they can really drive something home in a simple way.  George represents to me the untouchable enigma; that guy had one of the worst reputations in country music. He’d fire bands on stage, show up late, show up drunk, just a whole slew of bad judgment. But he was George Jones. That’s what he did. He had the golden voice and the perfect approach. Put him behind a microphone and all of his bad decisions were suddenly forgotten. Merle Haggard was the real deal. He grew up poor – maybe even in a box car – and spent some time in jail, just hard scrabble post-Depression California living. He was fearless in his songwriting. He always wrote edgy material. I admire that he was a rebel. He was never one of these flag-waving Nashville pop country jerk offs. He was making records with Willie Nelson, working with David Allan Coe, and was always sort of a fringe element. And Del Reeves was just a fun loving guy who wrote hysterical songs about girl watching and truck driving. Generally, he was just a super sweet fellow who cared more about being just a country singer. He cared about keeping the old traditions alive when he has television show – he’d bring Jimmy Martin and Bill Monroe out during an era when everything in country music was getting really cheesy. If I could ball bits of these three guys together, I would die a happy man.BRO – You just used the term “Nashville pop country jerk offs.” Should I bother asking you your take on the world of modern country music?JP – I’ve been known to be pretty outspoken about my opinion of modern pop country radio music. I can make some pretty tongue-in-cheek comments about it being filth or garbage, but the truth is that there are some pretty good players out there. I’ve lived in Nashville for a while and have met folks that play with these CMT- grade characters, and these guys and gals are good people. There is some of that stuff I like. Brad Paisley is a killer Telecaster player. But it doesn’t mean I think he is tasteful about what he plays all the time, and it doesn’t mean my opinion on folks like him is going to change that much, because I think they are degrading the name of country music. They are playing rock and roll.  They are playing pop. Just because you sing about drinking or about a truck and you put a cowboy hat on doesn’t mean it is country music. The idea that you can dumb down country music for the masses by melding it with other styles of music to make it popular on the radio is just offensive to me. Take Trace Adkins – he’s a great singer, and he’s funny. But I don’t think I’d ever want to go see him play and I would never go so far as to say he is an authentic country singer. He sings pop country music. In this day and age, there needs to be a real distinction there. Old school country characters that have been playing the music I play for a lot of years, guys like Dale Watson, Ray Wylie Hubbard, Billy Joe Shaver, and Wayne Hancock, never took the poison golden apple. I think these pop country guys could have stayed on the route of real old school country music, stuff that is real and simple, but they all get tempted by the big record deals and fancy mansions. Now, Lord knows I want to get paid real money for what I do, but I don’t feel like sacrificing authenticity and genuineness in my music to do that.  BRO – Is it more about creating a product and less about creating good music?JP – That’s exactly what it is. That’s what really bums me out about the whole thing. The are working on creating an image and an ideal. What these people are doing is preying on everyone’s poor desires. A lot of folks that listen to country music are hard working American people, making a living at the auto garage or answering the phone. And these pop country folks are doing the same thing that glam rock was doing in the 80s. They are wanting these people to believe that if they listen to this music, they’ll get nearly topless girls and big ass F-250s with lift kits and smokestacks, and every once in a while they’ll throw in a line about daddy’s farm. Even if the music is good, the image and lifestyle that these country people are throwing out there is just not right. It’s not accessible.  It’s not something that people are going to attain. But that’s how music has been sold over the last 35 years. Country music was never intended to be that.BRO – Is there anyone out there doing country music the right way?JP – There’s a ton of people out there doing it the right way. The unfortunate part is that there aren’t a lot of us out there on the road doing it, so a lot of people don’t get to hear it and find out about it. Dale Watson and Wayne Hancock have been out there for years. I have just been turned on to Whitey Morgan, and I am really digging what he does. Even stuff in the more indie country and alt-country vein is pretty cool, guys like Ryan Bingham & The Dead Horses. And I love Billy Joe Shaver and Ray Wylie Hubbard. They are still out there beating the pavement. There is a good undercurrent of solid country singers and bands out there touring. And they are doing it for the same reason I am doing it. They believe in the country gospel and have turned their lives into a road show. You have take it from town to town. One of the coolest things I hear at a show is, “You know, I didn’t even know I liked country music because I have never heard real country music.” These other guys I mentioned hear the same thing. That is what these younger guys are really going for – to turn people back on to country music.BRO – Tell me about the new record.JP – Man, I am pretty proud of it. I didn’t know if it was any good by the time I was done with it because I had listened to it about 700,000 times and I had zero objective perspective. But it’s doing really well and we are getting really good feedback about it. After three years of touring with just a little EP, I am happy to have a solid release to show the world what it is I am doing. But I am glad it took this long to get in the studio to get this done. I still have so much to learn about being a country singer and writing country songs. I am glad I was unwillingly forced to wait that long before I could release a record. I know it is better now than it would have been if I had released it a couple years ago.BRO – We are featuring the title track on this month’s Trail Mix. I hope I am not projecting here – or maybe I hope I am projecting – but it sounds like a tune most guys can relate to.JP – Oh, yeah. Guys and gals. I wrote that song about a woman who is still a good friend of mine. We had a short relationship. I was working up in New England working on a barn and staying this little old farmhouse attic and trying to visit this gal on the weekends. I tried calling her one night after a pretty bad day and never got in touch with her. So I just I kept calling this girl and kept getting her answering machine. We all know what drunk dialing is. I’ve done it a time or two in my life, up at 2 A.M. calling that ex-girlfriend from a year ago and sobbing about taking me back. If you haven’t done it, you have at least thought about it. I got to thinking about this idea that you call someone on the phone over and over again and you think they are going to finally answer. You are reaching out to someone, but they don’t have to answer the phone. They don’t have to take you back or tell you that they still love you. Hearing that recorded voice on the other end of the line asking you to leave a message can be one of the worst things to hear when your heart is breaking.J.P. Harris & The Tough Choices are headed west for the month of June, with dates in Louisiana, Texas, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, and Colorado on the schedule. They’ll be back in the Southeast in July. Catch them when you can and, in the meantime, order a copy of the new record at www.ilovehonkytonk.com.last_img read more

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From The Mountains To The Beaches: 5 Easy Coastal Hikes

first_imgWith summertime upon us, we’re trading in our hiking shorts for board shorts and heading to the beaches, but that doesn’t mean we’re going to stop exploring.While our Southeastern coastline is home to beautiful beaches and winding Intracoastal waterways, it also shelters incredible wildlife preserves, state parks, and hiking trails. The elevation change may not be much, but the scenery offers a refreshingly salty change of pace. From tidal marshes and winding boardwalks to greenways and pine forests, our coasts have a little something for everyone. The following trails are all rated as easy hikes, are perfect for the family, and allow the pups on a leash.Photo: Virginia State ParksFirst Landing State Park Trails, VirginiaRanging from shorter three-mile loops to over eight-mile out-and-backs, the trails at the 2,888 acre Frist Landing State Park in Virginia Beach can be pieced together to make it as short or as long as you’d like. With scenic water views, wooded hammocks, and Intracoastal beaches, the park has the perfect mix of the woods and the sea. During your hike, there are a couple beaches that are perfect for you or Fido to take a dip and cool off.Located on the Northern point of Virginia Beach near Cape Henry Lighthouse, the First Landing State Park trail system makes for a quick and easy hike for beachgoers.Photo: North Carolina Coastal FederationPatsy Pond Trails, North CarolinaThe Patsy Pond Nature Trails are located within the massive, 159,000 acre, Croatan National Forest in the middle of North Carolina’s Coast. This trail system consists of three loops ranging from .75 mile to 2 miles and meanders through an old pine forest, grassy marshes, and the banks of several ponds.This massive National Forest is less than a 30-minute drive from many popular North Carolina beach towns like Jacksonville, Atlantic Beach, and Emerald Isle.Photo: South Carolina ParksHuntington Beach State Park Trails, South CarolinaAlligators on one shoreline, sharks on the other, what more could you ask for? Toothy predators aside, the main loop at Hunting Beach State Park is beautiful. At just under three miles long, the trail takes you over a boardwalk, through a coastal forest, across tidal flats, and ends up at the beach. The park is rich in wildlife and features some of the best coastal birdwatching in the Southeast.Located just 30 minutes south of Myrtle Beach, Huntington Beach State Park is a timeless representative of South Carolina’s well preserved upper coastal plain.Photo: Georgia State ParksSkidaway Island Trails, GeorgiaLocated in Skidaway Island State Park, just Southeast of Savannah, this 588-acre state park has six miles of hiking trails to explore. Consisting of everything from island hammocks to tidal creeks, salt flats to alligator ponds, the terrain you’ll cover is as diverse as the wildlife that calls it home.Skidaway Island is less than 30 minutes from Downtown Savannah and is a quick outdoor getaway for folks looking to take a break from the city or the beach.Boneyard Beach TalbotBoneyard Beach on Big Talbot Island, FloridaThat’s right…I said Florida. It may not be a part of the Blue Ridge, but in this post, we’re traveling to the beaches, and in my opinion, Northeast Florida has the best of them. Located in Duval County, Boneyard Beach is on the Eastern edge of Big Talbot Island State Park. This apocalyptic stretch of sand looks like something out of a movie. The skeletal remains of fallen trees line the entire beach, forcing visitors to jump, duck, and crawl their way across the sand. With close parking and easy access, this picturesque stretch of coastline is one of Northeast Florida’s most photographed places.Also known as Driftwood Beach, it is only 30 minutes from I-95, making it an easy pit stop for folks headed south. Winding through windswept Scrub Oaks along the coast, the A1A corridor from Fernandina to Jacksonville is worth the trip alone.Most of us go to the beach to swim, surf, and work on our sweet bronze bods. That’s a given, but keep in mind, you may be able to take the hiker out of the mountains, but you’ll never take the mountains out of the hiker. Next time you’re on the coast, go for a hike.Justin Forrest is an outdoor writer, fly fishing addict, and co-founder of Narrative North—based in Asheville, N.C. He posts pictures of cats and fishing on Instagram sometimes.last_img read more

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It’s a Board Choice: High Performing or Not?

first_img 21SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr A high-performing organization is directly connected to a high-performing board. So how can you know which type of board yours has chosen to be?A high performing board is obvious because the room is vibrant, the organization’s performance is strong, and the board and CEO have a viable leadership relationship. Unfortunately, high-performing boards are a minority, as most boards could be described as “entrenched.” (For more on the five personalities of boards, including entrenched and high performing, read my “Know Your Rubber Band” post, also on CUES Skybox.)When a CEO is asked about the quality of the board of directors, the answer is spontaneous and open when the board is high performing. The CEO’s face brightens, and he or she smiles while expressing three to four of the board’s best attributes.Read the statements below: How many apply to your board? If I missed some attributes, write them in the comment box at the end of the blog. Let’s share what we see as high performance for all our boards. continue reading »last_img read more

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Why National Credit Union Youth Month presents massive opportunities for credit unions’ future

first_img 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Each year when the month of April rolls around, credit unions amplify their efforts to reach out to our nation’s youth and spread  the word on how to properly manage one’s money. It’s a big deal; and it should be. Reaching kids not only in April but year round is vital to future financial soundness. And it’s even cooler that this message comes from credit unions.To get the inside scoop on this annual effort, we invited CUNA’s Youth Month Coordinator Jeremiah Tucker on the show. Jeremiah joined us to discuss why National Credit Union Youth Month is so important to our industry and how participating credit unions can really capitalize on this initiative throughout the year — not just April.We also touched on 2016’s campaign theme: “Credit Union Strong: Pump Up Your Savings” and what it means to credit unions to spread the health-related message. According to Jeremiah, by transforming branches into “health clubs” and staffers into “personal trainers,” credit unions are leveraging the theme to encourage kids to get in shape financially. The youth-friendly messaging also illustrates how credit unions can make members and their communities stronger.Check it out and let us know your thoughts and how you are participating in reaching out to the kids to instill sound financial practices. continue reading »last_img read more

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As the war wages: Frontline v. back office

first_img 57SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Paul Robert Paul Robert has been helping financial institutions drive their retail growth strategies for over 20 years. Paul is the Chief Executive Officer for FI Strategies, LLC, a private consulting company … Web: fi-strategies.com Details Earlier this year I got a call from an old friend who said she needed my help with an exasperating situation festering at her credit union. She said her frontline employees were about to engage in full-scale (and possibly physical!) hostilities with her back office employees. She joked that she was considering installing metal detectors at the front door … not for external security reasons but for internal safety reasons. Since that conversation, I’ve shared this story with many other clients and every time they’ve nodded in agreement and acknowledged that their credit union is suffering from a similar affliction.  Though no one’s fault, similar dysfunction has seemed to inflict many in our industry and, if unchecked, the ramifications will be disastrous and potentially ruinous. Thwart the conflict now or endure the hardships in the not-too-distant future.On one side of the battle line stands the back office departments, holding to the policies and procedures instilled and stressed as mandatory and rigid. On the other side stands the frontline, proclaimed advocates for the member, yelping that the credit union wouldn’t exist without the service they’re trying to provide. Both are important and vital perspectives.But as the war wages and the epidemic spreads, everyone suffers – employees on both sides feel the frustration escalate; executives get caught in the middle or feel positioned to defend their turf (lines of business or departments); and members flat-out don’t care why something can’t be done (promptly or at all) and only care that you don’t care enough about them to do what they want done.To address this crucial issue, first recognize there is no magic wand. If you think there’s going to be an easy answer to such a complex problem, you’re going to be sadly disappointed. Second, acknowledge that everyone shares equally in the issue – both frontline and back office play critical roles in maximizing the member experience. But facing the issue and generating a solution may ultimately be the most important thing your credit union does in 2018.Following is a six-step roadmap to success:Promote teamwork. Find any and all reasons to get people working together. Get back office staff working with frontline staff. Get “old” employees working with “new” employees. Get managers working with non-managers. Give them projects to address specific business issues and goals. Dedicate time for them to get together and collaborate. These times should be mostly business related but mix in some social and fun, too. The only way for them to develop empathy and a better understanding of each other’s roles is to work in close unison. Set crystal clear expectations. Try something like: “If you directly serve members, your job is to serve them as well as you absolutely, positively can – no questions asked. If you don’t directly serve members, your job is to support those that do – no questions asked.” For member-facing staff, identify the desired behaviors for service and hold them accountable. For non-member-facing staff, identify the desired behaviors for service and hold them accountable. All employees need to have clear expectations and held to an equally high standard.Measure your performance every step of the way. This won’t be easy or perfect but with a little work it’ll be doable and acceptable. Identify feedback channels that allow you to capture emotions and feelings about service experiences as soon after the events as possible. Investments in various surveys, focus groups, observations, and coaching are necessary. Pay particular attention to those instances where multiple employees were involved in the process – how responsive were they? How friendly? Did each employee help or hinder the member experience? Make these measurements visible and a core component of coaching sessions and performance evaluations.Tackle specific member experience situations and map out the desired processes. When we talk about “mapping” it’s important to remember to do it from two perspectives: 1. Internal – what can or can’t you do from a delivery standpoint; and 2. External – what is the member feeling and desiring from an experience standpoint. This often eye-opening process compares what you think the process is and what your members say it is.Now, fix the issues! Once you’ve identified the gaps between the internal and external experience, get teams working on bridging the gap (#1 above), set expectations for a new way of handling those experiences (#2), and identify the metrics you’ll use to constantly measure and report your performance (#3). Look at your most common/important experiences first – loan application processing and problem resolution will likely be near the top of your list.Recognize there’s no finish line. This is an ongoing initiative. It’s exactly why top performing service organizations have an executive who “owns” the culture and experience. They maintain the focus on getting and keeping teams working together to deliver the highest possible levels of internal and external service across the organization. Report regularly and celebrate successes frequently. Who owns the culture and experience at your credit union?Again, it won’t be fast or easy but the alternative to not addressing your frontline/back office battle could be cataclysmic – member experience suffers; members and star employees defect; revenue and profitability decreases; credit union ceases to exist … hmmm, I’d say it’s worth repelling that warfare.If your credit union needs help mediating a peaceful solution between your frontline and back office, my firm can help. We work with organizations just like yours to create the cultures and experiences that keep your teams optimizing the member experience you desire and need. We can be reached at www.fi-strategies.com or 636-578-3280.last_img read more

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Reigning in a region

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Boeing set to get blame in Ethiopian report on crash of 737 Max

first_imgThe NTSB has received a copy of the draft interim report, spokesman Eric Weiss said. The safety board can’t comment on the contents of the draft, Weiss said.A Boeing spokesman declined to comment on the draft.The Federal Aviation Administration said in a statement it can’t comment before the report is released. The FAA isn’t a direct participant in the accident investigation, but is providing technical support under the NTSB because it certified the plane.The Ethiopian Transport Ministry and Ethiopian Airlines didn’t immediately respond to messages left after business hours.Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 suffered a malfunction to a sensor moments after liftoff. This triggered a safety feature known as Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System or MCAS that was programmed to automatically lower the nose and activated about 80 seconds into the flight.A preliminary report released by the Ethiopian investigators last April made clear that the MCAS system played a role in the accident. But it also said that pilots had let the plane fly too fast, which made it more difficult to control.The pilots began a Boeing procedure to disable MCAS, but apparently reactivated the system shortly before the plane entered a steep dive, according to the preliminary report.A committee of the US Congress released preliminary findings from its investigation on Friday, blasting US regulators and Boeing for a series of design and safety blunders.The 737 Max’s design and development “was marred by technical design failures, lack of transparency with both regulators and customers, and efforts to obfuscate information about the operation of the aircraft,” the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee said in a summary of preliminary findings from its nearly yearlong probe of the aircraft. Ethiopian crash investigators have tentatively concluded that the crash of a Boeing Co. 737 Max last year was caused by the grounded plane’s design, according to a draft report that’s being circulated to participants in the probe.The conclusions, which say little or nothing about the performance of Ethiopian Airlines or its flight crew, have raised concern with some participants in the investigation, according to three people familiar with the situation.The Ethiopian draft contrasts with conclusions by Indonesia’s National Transportation Safety Committee after a prior 737 Max crash in October 2018. Indonesian investigators cited multiple factors in the accident, including the plane’s design, poor maintenance and the pilots’ actions. Rather than release a full report, the Ethiopian Aircraft Accident Investigation Bureau plans to publish an interim update before the anniversary of the March 10, 2019, crash.The conclusions, which include recommendations, are only in draft form and could be altered before release, said the people, who requested anonymity to discuss the sensitive matter. It’s possible the US National Transportation Safety Board could request changes to the report or offer a dissenting opinion.Under United Nations provisions, other nations participating in an accident investigation should get 60 days to comment on a final report. The Ethiopian report wasn’t sent out for comment until about a week ago, according to one of the people involved.The provision doesn’t apply to an interim report, but they typically don’t include formal conclusions about the cause.center_img Topics :last_img read more

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India’s coronavirus tally crosses three million mark

first_imgIndia’s confirmed coronavirus cases crossed the three million mark Sunday with nearly 70,000 new infections, as the disease continues to surge in the world’s second most-populous nation.The health ministry said 69,239 cases were detected on Sunday, with 912 deaths taking the total number of fatalities to 56,706.Many experts say, however, that the real scale of the infection is much higher. Authorities in New Delhi said last week that an antibody study in the megacity suggested more than a quarter of the capital’s population had contracted the infection.Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government imposed one of the world’s strictest lockdowns in late March that has been mostly eased in recent weeks.But the epidemic has left Asia’s third-largest economy reeling, and tens of millions of people have lost their jobs and livelihoods.Individual states and cities have imposed localized lockdowns — including Haryana and Punjab, where cases have spiked in recent weeks. Topics :center_img Previously the main hotspots have been the teeming megacities of New Delhi and Mumbai, home to some of the world’s biggest slums.”At the moment we are seeing a fairly sharp rise in cases overall for India,” said K Srinath Reddy, of the non-governmental Public Health Foundation of India.last_img read more

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PREMIUMFinance Ministry urges local govts to diversify infrastructure funding amid budget cuts

first_imgLog in with your social account Facebook Topics : Forgot Password ? infrastructure-development infrastructure-fund finance-ministry budget-reallocation viability-gap-funding West-Java regional-administrations state-budget Google Linkedin LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here The Finance Ministry has urged regional administrations to look at alternative funding schemes, including public-private partnerships (PPP) and blended financing, to continue infrastructure development, as the state and regional budget will be geared toward fighting COVID-19.The prioritizing of COVID-19 recovery efforts in the state budget and regional budgets is expected to continue until 2022, according to the ministry’s director of state financial risk management, Brahmantio Isdijoso, on Wednesday.“We expect budget cuts for infrastructure projects and, therefore, we need to find new ways to fund the projects,” he said during an online discussion held by the ministry.The government plans to provide assistance in setting up new funding schemes for infrastructure development, including more progressive PPP schemes, municipal bonds, as well as project-linked …last_img read more

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