Prof. discusses post-grad economy

first_img “Companies try really hard to keep pay scales secret from workers,” Wozniak said. “It does happen within companies that people who enter [the company] at different times have similar jobs but are earning different things.” She said that sometimes, those entering the job force compare their salaries to a sibling’s who started a job a few years earlier. She said to remember not to take salary levels personally. “The scarring effect takes about five to 10 years to overcome, but with this economic situation, it could take a bit longer,” Wozniak said.  “In fact, I think it will take longer.”  “Markets may improve dramatically in a few years, but they may not,” she said. “Even if they do, students who seek to avoid market conditions by staying in school longer will miss out on several years of earnings and advancement, and they will face stiffer competition for graduate school slots and post-graduate school jobs.” “I think it’s important for workers who started in a downturn to continually look for ways to catch up, especially after the economy improves,” she said. “Think more about changing jobs, moving to a new location, or asking for a raise or promotion.” Wozniak said this discrepancy in earnings takes time to overcome.  In addition, it is costly for these workers to adjust to their situation by going back to school, getting a higher degree or switching jobs, Wozniak said.  Wozniak found that the scarring effect was widespread, and moved across different demographic groups.   Research by Abigail Wozniak, Notre Dame assistant professor of economics, determined those who enter the work force during a bad economy will receive lower wages than those who enter during an economic boom, and this negative impact can last up to 10 years. Wozniak said there is a correlation between the state of the economy and job wages. She said higher wages of those who enter the job world during an economic boom stick with them, and lower wages of those who begin their job during a downturn stick with them as well.  The scarring effect is worse for college graduates than it is for high school graduates, Wozniak, said, “probably because they transition from jobs in more of a progression.”center_img College graduates assume they will enter a career and then build that career over the years. Therefore, these workers are likely to stay on a certain job trajectory, making it difficult to overcome the disadvantage they started with.  “The scarring effect is the idea that the conditions you have when you start working will affect your future [occupational achievement],” she said.  She concluded it impacts college graduates, high school graduates, college dropouts or those with two-year degrees, as well as high school dropouts.  “There’s a perception in the U.S. that what you earn exactly [corresponds] to how good you are,” she said. “Students and others as well should recognize that earnings are not driven entirely by individual productivity or ability. A very large component is luck.  It would be wrong to believe you are earning say 10 percent less than a friend or colleague did when she started just because you are not as qualified.” Wozniak also said that firms are not adjusting perfectly to economic changes. Wozniak said it is unclear whether getting a graduate degree and hoping to enter the job market during better economic times will be beneficial to students.  Job change is a major way in which one can overcome the scarring effect, Wozniak said. It is easier for those without a college degree to switch jobs and quickly overcome this negative impact, because they are not as reluctant to start over in a new job.   “My estimates suggest that workers lose six percent of wages for every two additional percentage points of unemployment above the average,” she said. “We’re currently about four percentage points above average, so wages for this year’s graduates will be roughly 12 percent below that of similar graduates from four years ago.” In her research, which will be published in the Journal of Human Resources this fall, Wozniak looked at almost 30 years of data of people entering the labor market. She used census data from 1980, 1990, and 2000, looking at workers five to eight years after they entered the labor force.last_img read more

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Idina Menzel on How She’s Preparing to Sing ‘Let It Go’ at the Oscars

first_imgIt’s almost time to see what she can do! Idina Menzel has revealed in a new interview with HuffPost Entertainment, how she’s preparing to sing Frozen’s smash hit “Let It Go” on the Oscars telecast March 2. The Tony winner admits that she’s “working on the song with my teacher, because it’s not the kind of song you can wake up and roll out of bed and sing. It’s a challenging song and quite acrobatic, so I have to be in my best voice.” View Comments We’re sure that the Broadway.com Audience Choice Award winner will be! Menzel also drew parallels with the Bobby Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez’s-penned song’s success and a certain other one of our favorites. Menzel admitted that she knows “how lucky I am to have this. I had it with Wicked and “Defying Gravity.”” Star Filescenter_img And what of “Let It Go’s” main competition at the Oscars, the U2 song “Ordinary Love” from the movie Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom? Menzel just hopes “my soundcheck is back to back with Bono’s soundcheck, because I’ve never met him in my life and it’s like a dream for me to meet him.” If you can’t wait to see Menzel test the limits and break through at the 86th Academy Awards, check out the video of her below belting out the anthem recently in L.A.! Idina Menzellast_img read more

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Economic Reality May Finally Kill Proposed Carmichael Coal Project

first_imgEconomic Reality May Finally Kill Proposed Carmichael Coal Project FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The Guardian:Adani’s coal-fired power business has reported more heavy losses, prompting the Indian conglomerate to announce it would shift away from using expensive imported coal.Analysts say the fourth-quarter financial results for Adani Power, a subsidiary of the Adani group, showed the proposed Carmichael mega-mine in Queensland was no longer a viable proposition.Remarkably in the context of the Carmichael project, the billionaire Adani Group boss, Gautam Adani, acknowledged in a statement that the cost of importing coal to India had contributed to Adani Power’s struggles.“We expect to receive [domestic coal] for the Tiroda and Kawai plants in the near future, which will help reduce fuel costs and improve profitability of these projects,” he said. “Under-recovery of fuel costs for Mundra project have impacted its financial viability, and we are in dialogue with key stakeholders for an early solution.”The Mundra power plant, which operates on imported coal, was the planned destination for the spoils from the Carmichael project. After Mundra fell into financial trouble, Adani attempted unsuccessfully to sell the plant. It has not operated since February. The Indian financial services company Edelweiss said Adani Power was “on thin ice” and doubted whether Mundra would reopen.Tim Buckley, an analyst for the pro-renewables Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, said Gautam Adani “didn’t become one of the wealthiest man in India by throwing good money after bad on bad projects. The result reconfirms the point IEEFA has made repeatedly. [Adani Power] is unable to provide a viable nor bankable coal offtake agreement for…the Carmichael proposal.”Adani told Guardian Australia the company was “100% committed to the Carmichael project”. “There has been no change to our marketing strategy. India will remain the key market for Carmichael coal,” the company said in a statement. More: Adani Losses Prompt Mining Company To Shift Away From Imported Coallast_img read more

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11 tactics top leaders use to inspire innovation

first_img 185SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Matt Monge Matt Monge is a speaker, consultant, blogger, mental health advocate, and the founder of The Mojo Company. His mission? Simple. He’s on a crusade to make the world a better … Web: www.themojocompany.com Details Innovation has this certain mystique around it, doesn’t it? As we think and talk through what it will take for credit unions to be successful in an increasingly competitive future, we know in some abstract way that we need to be innovative to some degree to continue to compete and survive; but as far as how we can actually become more innovative, beyond simply proclaiming at a team meeting – We shall henceforth…innovate! – we’re a bit unsure.It seems to me that like most things, innovation, when conceptualized from an organizational perspective, can almost be thought of as a mindset or way of being that has to be cultivated. The organization has to be designed to be innovative in the same way it has to be designed to be anything else you’d like it to be. That’s why culture remains so incredibly important. Your credit union will only be as innovative as its culture is designed to be.So what might that look like? While this will vary from place to place, here are some tactics top leaders will use to inspire a more innovative culture within their credit unions. Top leaders inspire innovation by giving people time to exercise creative effort toward solving organizational problems.People can’t be innovative if their days are jam-packed with other tasks from start to finish. Innovation takes time. But don’t skip over the last four words above – toward solving organizational problems. Involve your people in solving organizational issues. Engage them in the effort. Top leaders inspire innovation by giving people time to think, read, and/or learn.Similar to the above, if you want folks to innovate, they’re going to need time to research, think, and learn new things. Top leaders inspire innovation by challenging people to be creative.You challenge them with sales goals because you want them to sell stuff. You challenge them with wellness goals because you want them to be well. So if you want them to be creative, you should…? Anyone? Anyone? Bueller? Bueller? Top leaders inspire innovation by making it safe to try things.Now it’s important to notice I didn’t say to say it was safe for them to try things. It’s important to actually make it safe to try things. They need to feel the safety. Top leaders inspire innovation by rethinking meetings.This may seem an odd thing to mention, but think about it this way. Most meetings are almost universally acknowledged as a colossal waste of time. Some meetings are necessary and important, sure. But others? Not so much.There are a number of reasons they end up taking place, and perhaps that’s a post for another day. But think about all the time and brainpower wasted in meetings that could be put to use thinking of ways to make things better. Top leaders inspire innovation by encouraging the oddballs.Every organization’s got ‘em. You might even be one of ‘em. My theory is that they might just be your secret weapons. They clearly think differently than most people, but isn’t that exactly what you’re looking for? So why not encourage the oddballs? Top leaders inspire innovation by thinking about the workspace.I’ve jokingly said before that cubicles are tiny, cubed prisons where ideas go to die. And by jokingly, I mean I’m being completely serious. It’s not that you can’t use cubicles, but you’ve got to figure out ways to get the team out of them sometimes. Or have really low walls. Or something. Have meetings other places. Go outside, for the love of pancakes and pogo sticks.Does the workspace encourage creativity? I had an acquaintance who used to work at Pixar and his job was to – get this – create the spaces within which the creative folks would create their stuff. He didn’t create the films, but he worked on creating the spaces that would be conducive to helping the creatives be creative.Same principle here. Does the work environment encourage people to think differently? What do they feel like? Just looking at them, what sorts of actions or behaviors or attitudes do you think they encourage? What symbolism do they bring? Are they sterile? Bright? Uniform? Individualized? Formal? Relaxed? Closed in? Open? Buzzing fluorescent lights? Natural light? Colorful? Colorless?It all matters. It all combines to create a certain atmosphere. That atmosphere can be one that either encourages or stifles innovation. Top leaders inspire innovation by thinking about how they’re encouraging curiosity.Unless you’re employing cats, there’s no need to shy away from encouraging your team to be more curious. You see, curiosity is what leads to learning and innovation. We’re first curious about something, and then we learn about something or figure out if something can be done differently or better. So how are you encouraging curiosity?(For those of you still puzzling over that first sentence, just remember what curiosity does to cats…) Top leaders inspire innovation by making sure people have easy access to knowledge.I know, I know. This one seems weird too, but again, hang with me for a second. What people know about a given topic or subject is what gives their minds a conceptual framework within which it can work. In other words, it provides the backdrop and tools it needs to then think differently about something. Some level of knowledge about a thing is a prerequisite to innovation in that area.For example, if someone asked me to think innovatively about oh, say, theoretical physics, I’d be in deep trouble unless I was able to phone my close, personal friend, Dr. Sheldon Lee Cooper, B.S., M.S., M.A., Ph.D., Sc.D. And that’s because I have zero knowledge of theoretical physics.So do employees have access to information? How easy is it from them to learn and grow? How easily can they share knowledge across the organization? Those things affect an organization’s ability to innovate. Top leaders inspire innovation by hiring for innovation.This is all part of designing your organization and cultivating a culture to have innovation as one of its inherent qualities; but are you constructing your talent acquisition strategy with an eye toward finding and hiring innovative people? Very few interviews I’ve seen or heard of do anything substantive relating to uncovering if candidates have any inclination toward innovation or creativity.Can it be done? Absolutely it can. I’ve been part of teams that have done it, and we work with clients to do it. There are plenty of things you can ask and do throughout the recruitment process to uncover candidates’ inclinations towards creativity and/or innovation. It’s just a matter of building that stuff into the process and applying it consistently. Top leaders inspire innovation by proactively encouraging it.This is absolutely huge, of course.If leaders are OK with people flexing their innovative muscles every once in a while when they have free time, innovation will likely flourish at your organization.Right?No! It won’t, because that’s still way too passive if you truly want innovation to be something that’s ingrained into your credit union’s culture and organizational way of life. It’s not enough to be OK with something. Leaders have to be…well…leading. They should be pushing it, asking about it, facilitating it, coaching toward it, demonstrating it themselves, and so on.So what’s the bottom line? Like anything else your organization wants to see happen regularly, innovation is something that must be intentionally built into your organization’s culture or else it has no chance of being a sustainable part of your organization’s identity.last_img read more

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CDC cites more evidence of H1N1 targeting the young

first_imgOct 20, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – Federal health officials presented more evidence today that pandemic H1N1 influenza primarily targets young people, reporting that more than half of recently hospitalized patients and close to a quarter of those who died were younger than 25.In 4,958 hospital cases of H1N1 reported from 27 states, 53% of patients were younger than 25, while 39% were between 25 and 65, and another 7% were elderly, said Dr. Anne Schuchat, director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The data cover the period from Sep 1 to Oct 10.”This is really, really different from what we see with seasonal influenza,” Schuchat said at a news teleconference. “With seasonal flu, about 60% of hospital cases occur in people 65 and over, and here we’re only seeing about 7% of hospitalizations in that age-group, illustrating that this virus is disproportionately affecting the young.”The age distribution for deaths reported in that same period was slightly older. Of 292 deaths reported from 28 states, 23.6% were in people younger than 25, while 65% involved those between 25 and 64 years of age and 11.6% involved those 65 and older, she reported.”Again, this is dramatically different than what we see with seasonal flu,” in which elderly people account for 90% of the deaths, she said.The latest figures on hospital cases are comparable with numbers reported in a recent New England Journal of Medicine article on 272 hospital cases in May and early June. Forty-four percent of those patients were younger than 18, 50% were between 18 and 64, and 5% were older.Vaccine supply edges upwardMeanwhile, the supply of vaccine to protect people from H1N1 continues to climb slowly, Schuchat reported. As of yesterday evening, a cumulative total of 12.8 million doses had become available, and states had ordered 10.8 million of those, she said. Those numbers compare with 9.8 million doses available and 5.8 million ordered a week ago.The flow of H1N1 vaccine thus far has been well below earlier CDC predictions, which had envisioned the availability of 45 million doses by mid October. “I wish that we had more than we have right now, but I do want to let you know that we do have more coming out every day,” Schuchat said.More than half of the doses supplied so far are the injectable formulation, she said. The earliest doses released were the nasal spray vaccine made by MedImmune, which is approved only for healthy people aged 2 to 49 years and cannot be given to pregnant women, who are among the high-risk groups.Schuchat said there has been “tremendous demand” for the H1N1 vaccine in many states, though reports have been mixed overall.She also promised that more seasonal flu vaccine is on the way, amid many reports of local shortages. She reiterated previous statements that about 82 million doses have been distributed so far and that the CDC expects to see a total of about 114 million doses.”We have seen a lot of demand for seasonal flu vaccine,” she said. Calling on the public to be patient, she said supplies are likely to improve in November.Antiviral use encouragedFollowing up on guidance that the CDC issued yesterday, Schuchat made a point of urging clinicians to use antiviral drugs for suspected H1N1 patients who are severely ill or have risk factors such as pregnancy, asthma, or diabetes, or are under 2 years old.”If you get a rapid test and it’s negative, you can’t really rely on that,” she said. “If you suspect flu, it’s very important to provide those antivirals quickly.” The World Health Organization gave similar advice about antiviral use last week.In response to a question, Schuchat said clinicians haven’t been reluctant to use antivirals, but the testing is “a little bit new,” and some may not recognize that a negative test doesn’t necessarily rule out the infection.She was also asked about a report suggesting that up to 60% of people infected with H1N1 will have no symptoms. She replied that the CDC is conducting serologic studies but does not yet know how many asymptomatic infections may be occurring.”But I can say that the vast majority of people are susceptible to this infection . . . and vaccination makes a lot of sense,” she said.See also: Oct 8 CIDRAP News story “Two reports offer new data on severe H1N1 cases”http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/influenza/swineflu/news/oct0809hospital.htmllast_img read more

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We learn from others how to improve our business. Now is the time to plan

first_imgChanges in trends through real data  Arival Online is a series of webinars that will last officially until April 12, but earlier webinars can be found and viewed on request. Also, new webinars are planned. Although the ITB was canceled, I visited Berlin, had the opportunity to talk to colleagues who had been on an unofficial a few days before Arivalu. A completely different visit to Berlin, but this visit had one positive connotation. They talked openly, without strong sales stories. Without the need for make-up, it has already been seen how we can continue to do better together. Therefore, I would like to present you with a list of great references that I warmly recommend. Since we work in tours and attractions sector, most references are related to companies that organize tours, excursions, and activities, but I’m sure some business development webinars can help anyone. Chris Torres is also one well-known name from the travel marketing sector. He works as a marketing consultant for tour companies, mostly for smaller companies, leads Digital Tourism Show podcast, and decided to share the recently published book “Lookers into Bookers” besplatno. In a situation where the work has stopped, we should take advantage of the awkward situation, look at what we can do better in the future, and look at constructive and objective (or as objective as possible) ideas, suggestions, projections that follow us further. Peter Syme is a world famous name in the promotion of technology in Tour & Activity sector and offers free one-hour counseling. With us, this way of communication is still new, but you can literally contact him via LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/petersyme/ He also released a free version of another shorter e-book: Coronavirus – Marketing Battle plan: https://tourismmarketing.agency/coronavirus-marketing-battle-plan  Arival is a conference that is held several times a year on different continents, and the target audience is tour and excursion organizers, tourist guides, organizers of tourist events, online travel agencies.  Sawyer’s Travel Marketing Blog Author: Ivan Ilijašić, Orioles Peter is a long-term consultant, he has several tour companies, multi-day trekking tours in Asia, rafting tours, before tourism he worked in the army and you can contact him directly without any environment. Warm recommendation and let us know your impression! The previous lecturers are Douglas Quinby, founder of Arivala, Chris Torres, Director of Tourism Marketing Agency, Tao Tao, COO GetYourGuidea, Peter Syme, veteran of travel tech consulting), Kelsey Tonner, author of courses on how to be a better tourist guide, I’m Drew, the new CEO of Viator. Free consultations for business strategy development Arival Online – webinars, interviews In these webinars you will be able to see that you are not alone in this situation. Lookers into Bookers – a free book for marketing and introducing technology to the tour business. On their website you can find weekly and daily reports, news from tourism:https://adara.com/traveler-trends-tracker/ What positively surprised me in recent weeks is that our tourism industry has opened up and today it is possible to find a lot of great sources of information, webinars that can help us look ahead, plan, share knowledge.  Sawyer and ADARA are data-driven tourism consulting companies whose job is to track trends and help analyze that data to ultimately offer tourism the best possible tourism experience. Tourmageddon – news, ideas, recovery plans Behind this page is Alex Bainbridge, a veteran of the travel tech sector, who has been in this business for 20 years and on the site www.tourmageddon.com offers free ideas, tips, concrete examples from practice, without the environment.It is important to emphasize, most of these references are people who have had the opportunity to develop more jobs in their careers, work on big projects, develop destinations and definitely have something to say and give us ideas on how to better plan our business. With all that, I recommend LinkedIn. The above colleagues, in particular Peter, Chris, Shane Whaley (www.tourpreneur.com) initiate constructive discussions on a daily basis that can give everyone ideas on how to move forward. In recent weeks, we’ve been more concerned with how to survive for months, while business planning has fallen into the second or third plan.last_img read more

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White hot

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Pablo Mari rates own display against Mane and Salah after Arsenal transfer

first_imgMari faced Liverpool in the Club World Cup (Picture: Getty)Pablo Mari expects to adapt quickly to Premier League football after faring well against Liverpool in the Club World Cup.The centre-back joined the Gunners from Flamengo, becoming Mikel Arteta’s first signing as manager of Arsenal.Flamengo were beaten by Liverpool in the Club World Cup final earlier this season and Mari rated his own performance against the likes of Mohamed Salah and Sadio Mane.He told the Arsenal website: ‘It was a great experience. It was really exciting to play against a big club and I think I performed really well.ADVERTISEMENT‘At the end of the day, they’re just people like everyone else.AdvertisementAdvertisement‘Obviously they’re in great form at the moment and they’re among the best players in the world, but we also have a fantastic team with top players. Coral BarryWednesday 29 Jan 2020 1:52 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link1.2kShares Comment Advertisement Mari joins Arsenal on loan from Flamengo (Picture: Getty)‘This is football and that’s the way you have to look at it.‘You have to compete against every side, whether it’s Liverpool or any other club in the world.‘I have a lot of faith in this great club, Arsenal, and I know we’re going to do very well.’Arsenal have signed Mari on a six-month loan deal, but the expectation is the former Manchester City player will join on a permanent transfer if he performs well at the Emirates.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityDespite being a City player, Mari never played for Pep Guardiola’s side and the Spaniard believes he is joining one of the best sides in the world.‘It’s a massive opportunity for me to come to England, which is the best league in the world right now,’ he said.‘Being able to play in this league and having the opportunity to play for Arsenal is incredible, so I’m really looking forward to wearing the shirt as soon as possible.‘I want to help my team to win matches and give my fans something to celebrate.’MORE: Arsenal confirm signing of Pablo Mari from FlamengoMORE: Mikel Arteta speaks out on Arsenal’s transfer plans after Pablo Mari delay Pablo Mari confident of Arsenal success after facing Liverpool duo Mohamed Salah and Sadio Mane Advertisementlast_img read more

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Boxing: Tyson reveals one condition that will stop comeback

first_img ‘Iron Mike’ recently announced his plans to make a comeback in charity matches and he posted training footage that sent fight fans into a frenzy. Many outlets have reported the 53-year-old’s plans to return to the ring, some of which Tyson himself has shot down. “That’s all I’ve been doing, getting into shape,’ Tyson said on a #PlayApartTogether live stream on Facebook.“I feel unstoppable now. I feel the same [as when I was in my prime] again. The gods of war ignited my ego and want me to go to war again.“Imagine if I went out there and fought and I could help all these people we talked about.”Despite the hype surrounding a potential comeback, legendary boxing promoter Frank Warren has slammed Tyson and said he would have ‘no chance’ against any heavyweight.“I don’t care if Mike Tyson is in the gym for the next ten years, he has no chance against any heavyweight,” he wrote in his column for the Metro.Tyson with legendary former promoter Don KingRead Also: Joshua sends message to legends Mike Tyson, Mayweather“I have no idea who would license him at the age of 53 if it wasn’t an exhibition match. I can’t see any governing body doing that. He’s in there getting himself fit and well, and that’s brilliant.“His coach talking about him fighting any of the heavyweights out there, would I ever put him with someone like Daniel Dubois? Never. It’d be an embarrassment. I can’t think of a single heavyweight he could fight.”FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Promoted Content10 Risky Jobs Some Women Do6 Ridiculous Health Myths That Are Actually TrueBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever MadeYou’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of Anime5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksBest Car Manufacturers In The WorldTop 10 Historical Mysteries That Still Haven’t Been SolvedWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?What Are The Most Delicious Foods Out There?Top 7 Best Car Manufacturers Of All TimeBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For Them8 Amazing Facts About Ancient Egypt Mike Tyson will only make a long-awaited return to boxing to fight a ‘another bonafide boxer’ – as he doesn’t want to make a mockery of the sport. Advertisement However, an insider close to the former world champion revealed to SunSport: “Mike has ruled out the prospect of the exhibition bout in Australia because he does not want to fight a cross-over athlete.If Mike returns to boxing, it will only be to fight another bonafide boxer.“Mike believes anything else would be an insult to the sport.”Tyson’s respect for the sport of boxing is well known and the strong beliefs would not be out of character for the ‘Baddest Man on the Planet’.The Brooklyn native revealed on Saturday that the ‘Gods of War’ have reawakened inside him and that he’s ready to fight. Loading… last_img read more

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The Republic of Ireland – a history of play-off heartache

first_imgThe Republic of Ireland’s defeat in Poland on Sunday night means they now face the daunting prospect of tackling a two-legged play-off to qualify for Euro 2016 in France. Martin O’Neill’s side would have automatically reached next summer’s European Championship with a 2-2 draw in Warsaw but could not find a late equaliser and they will now be in next Sunday’s play-off draw – with history largely going against them. Five of their seven previous attempts at making major finals via the play-off route have ended in heartache and here Press Association Sport looks back on that record for the men in green. WORLD CUP 1966 v SPAIN Syria’s withdrawal from qualification led to a play-off with Spain after both sides had won their respective home fixtures. Jose Ufarte’s first international goal for the Spaniards was enough to seal a 1-0 win in Paris, booking their place at the tournament in England. EURO 96 v HOLLAND Another chance to feature in England was missed when Jack Charlton’s side lost 2-0 to Holland at Anfield. A budding young striker by the name of Patrick Kluivert scored both goals as the Dutch progressed and Charlton’s reign as Ireland boss drew to a close. WORLD CUP 1998 v BELGIUM Denis Irwin’s early strike in the home leg was cancelled out by Luc Nilis as the Belgians took a 1-1 draw back to Brussels. There, goals from Luis Oliviera and Nilis were too much for Ireland who succumbed to a 2-1 defeat with Ray Houghton’s goal coming in vain as substitute David Connolly was sent off late on. EURO 2000 v TURKEY Away goals would be the undoing of Mick McCarthy’s side this time around as Tayfur Havutcu’s late penalty at Landsdowne Road drew Turkey level after Robbie Keane had opened the scoring. Against a background of anger and recriminations over the training facilities afforded to the respective teams, the second leg in Bursa ended 0-0 to send Turkey on to Belgium and Holland for the finals. WORLD CUP 2002 v IRAN Only a superior goal difference saw Portugal top their qualifying group ahead of Ireland, who were plunged into the play-offs again despite taking four points off Holland. Iran were their opponents and they finally ended years of hurt as Ian Harte and Keane struck to give McCarthy’s men a 2-0 lead to take to Tehran. With skipper Roy Keane missing from the squad. Ireland endured a tense night but Yahya Golmohammadi’s stoppage-time strike was not enough to deny the visitors their place in Japan and South Korea. WORLD CUP 2010 v FRANCE Unquestionably the most memorable of Ireland’s long history of play-off disappointments. Giovanni Trapattoni’s side lost 1-0 at home but drew level in the Stade de France courtesy of Keane, only to see William Gallas score a controversial extra-time winner. Thierry Henry provided the cross for his compatriot but had controlled the ball with his hand before doing so. The offence went unseen by the officials and it was enough for France to qualify for South Africa, leaving the Irish at home once more. EURO 2012 v ESTONIA Unlike in previous years, Ireland all but sewed up qualification in the opening leg – this time winning 4-0 against nine men in Tallinn. Keith Andrews and Jonathan Walters struck for Trapattoni’s side before Keane bagged a brace meaning the 1-1 draw at the Aviva Stadium in the return leg was more than enough for them to reach the finals in Poland and Ukraine. Press Associationlast_img read more

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