Cold cure for sores

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Only 10 seconds more!Ice baths are crucial to post-match recovery, says Crofton Alexander.For rugby players to stay at the peak of their fitness, post-match recovery is vital. They need to be able to train shortly after a match and be ready for the next game, which can be as soon as five days later.Moreover, how well a player recovers can be the difference between longing for the next week to come around and being ready to throw in the towel after week one.Ice baths have been used in professional sport for about ten years, and have been at the centre of debate. They’ve been the subject of extensive and ongoing research, as scientists have discussed what the optimum temperature and time spent in the bath is, whether it’s better to sit or stand, or whether to use an alternative method of recovery.Initially, it was believed that the colder the temperature, the better the outcome would be. he cold constricts the blood vessels and limits the blood flow, slowing down the metabolism. This flushes out metabolic by-products such as lactic acid, which makes the muscles sore after a hard workout.However, recent research has shown that too much time spent in too cold an ice bath can do more harm than good. Muscles are like rubber and become compliant when heated. So if too long is spent in the cold, they will stiffen up.The aim is to restore the body back to its normal state, and in sport this has to happen at an accelerated rate, so the recovery process is manipulated.Ideally, a player will spend between eight and ten minutes in water at 10-15°C straight after a game to reduce initial inflammation of the joints. Then, 24 hours later, they will spend two minutes in cold water followed by two minutes in water at 30-40°C, six times. This is known as hot and cold flushing, and constricts and dilates the blood vessels, getting the blood flowing and softening the muscles.Forwards tend to feel it more in the neck and shoulders, so prefer to sit in the bath, and the backs will be sorer in the lower body and favour standing.Some players hate ice baths, and low-impact exercise such as cycling can also get the blood flowing without using excess energy. But even if the effect of an ice bath is only psychological, it can still help a player prepare for the following week.Crofton Alexander is part of Wasps’ strength and conditioning teamIce baths are good for the joints after a gameUse heat on your muscles the next day center_img If you hate the ice, try cycling insteadlast_img read more

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Vickerman signs for England Sevens

first_imgGLOUCESTER, ENGLAND – APRIL 02: Falcons centre Rob Vickerman in action during the Aviva Premiership game between Gloucester and Newcastle Falcons at Kingsholm Stadium on April 2, 2011 in Gloucester, England. (Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Rob Vickerman Rob Vickerman will join the England Sevens set-up from Newcastle Falcons next season.The centre has signed a two-year deal to become a full-time member of head coach Ben Ryan’s squad.Vickerman, 25, appeared in more than 50 Aviva Premiership matches for the Falcons and Leeds Carnegie. He made his sevens debut for England in 2005 and was part of the side that won the Wellington and London titles in 2009.The current England squad – including eight full-time sevens players for the first time this season – are preparing for this weekend’s Emirates Airline London Sevens where they will continue their chase for a first-ever HSBC Sevens World Series title.Vickerman said: “The opportunity to be a full time sevens player fills me with excitement and it means I can fully commit to the HSBC Sevens World Series and spend all year developing my skills and fitness purely for sevens. “I have thoroughly enjoyed playing for Leeds and Newcastle and am proud about making 50 Aviva Premiership appearances, but the chance to focus on playing in a top England Sevens team is too good to miss.“I back sevens to develop into a truly global game and inclusion in the Olympics from 2016 will see the sport rocket. I want to be part of that and part of a consistently successful England team driving the standards.” England Sevens head coach Ryan said: “Rob was my England Sevens player of the season in 2009 and provided the glue that allowed everyone else to operate. His game sense, professionalism, skills and work ethic make him the perfect first signing for next year’s squad.”You can watch England Sevens in action and join the beach party on May 21 and 22 at Twickenham Stadium in the Emirates Airline London Sevens, the penultimate leg of the HSBC Sevens World Series. Tickets are available from £15 via rfu.comlast_img read more

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Top 14: Tim Lane on his hopes for Lyon

first_imgTL: There is change but I think the ‘Big Six’ – Racing, Montpellier, Castres, Toulouse, Toulon and Clermont – will still be the Big Six this season. I think the change is the competitiveness of the other eight clubs who are more pushing up more strongly. It’s no longer the case – touch wood! – that the newly-promoted sides go straight back down to Pro2. I was very surprised that Perpignan went down last season but less so for Biarritz because they’ve been treading water for a few seasons.RW: How has the Top 14 changed since your first spell with Clermont?TL: I think that from 2000 to the 2003 World Cup the focus was much more on attack. Since 2003 it’s steadily been more about defence, what I call ‘Three Point Rugby’, sides taking penalty kicks from 50 metres instead of kicking into the corner and looking to score tries.RW: What prompted this change in philosophy?TL: There is more pressure on coaches to win now and that produces conservative rugby. France used to be famous for its flair but we don’t see much flair these days. It’s a great shame because you want to see teams and players express themselves.RW: So the decline of the France national team is not to do with the number of overseas players in the Top 14?TL: A lot of people blame the number of foreigners in the Top 14 but that’s a smokescreen. It’s more the attitude of the coaches who are creating a risk-free game. I believe it would encourage more attacking rugby if the Top 14 awarded a bonus point for scoring four tries rather than the present system (whereby a bonus point is awarded only to a winning team that scores three tries more than their opponents).Golden trio: coaches Tim Lane, Rod Macqueen and Jeff Miller after Australia’s 1999 World Cup winRW: Do you think there will be exodus of Australian players to the Top 14 after the 2015 World Cup?TL: Yes, there will be an exodus because I’ve been having a lot of CVs land on my desk in the last few weeks, and there are some surprising ones, not just from Australia.RW: What can Australia do to stop a player drain?TL: If I were them (ARU) I would do what South Africa do and allow four to five key players to play overseas and still represent the Springboks. There are some good young players in Australia who have recently committed for the next two years, but if the ARU maintain the rule that to play for Wallabies you have to play in Australia it will damage us because we could lose the likes of (Quade) Cooper, (Israel) Folau and (Will) Genia.RW: Finally, your ambitions for the season? On the up: Lyon’s players celebrate winning the Pro2 title last season – how will they fare in the Top 14? LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TIM LANE is one of the world’s most experienced and respected coaches – and one of its most travelled. After winning three caps in the centre for Australia in the 1980s the 54-year-old began his coaching career with Manly. He soon joined the Wallaby staff and was assistant coach when they won the 1999 World Cup. The following year he had his first stint in France, guiding Clermont to the final of the 2000-01 Top 16, and he subsequently had spells with Brive (2006) and Toulon (2007).Lane, a member of the Springbok backroom staff from 2001 to 2003, coached Georgia to the 2011 World Cup in New Zealand and he was appointed head coach of Lyon at the start of 2013-14. His first season ended in triumph with Lyon the runaway winners in Pro2 and returning to the Top 14 after two years out of the top flight.With the new French season kicking off on Friday 15 August, Lane talks all things Top 14 with Rugby World…Rugby World: How pleased are you with Lyon’s pre-season preparations?Tim Lane: They have been very good. We had our first warm-up game at the weekend against Oyonnax (Lyon won 12-7) and though it rained heavily for most of the first half we picked up a lot of positives, particularly our lineout and our defence. Obviously it will be a step up for a lot of blokes because the step up in standard from Pro2 to Top 14 is big. But a lot of our new recruits have played Top 14 before.RW: What are the biggest differences between the Pro2 and the Top 14?TL: We’re focusing a lot in training on the breakdown and the physicality because in the Top 14 a lot of sides contest the breakdown out wide and send more numbers in over the ball. Last season we scored 112 tries in 30 games and didn’t shoot for penalty goals much. But the Top 14 will be tighter so if there are three points on offer we’ll take them, though we’ll still look to attack as much as possible.RW: Fijian winger Mosese Ratuvou was Pro2’s top try-scorer last season with 21 in 25 matches but he scored just once when Lyon were last in Top 14…TL: Three years ago Lyon didn’t win many games and he didn’t get much opportunity to score tries. But I’m confident in him, as I am in all the players.Wise Wallaby: George Smith in action for Australia against the Lions last summerRW: Why did you sign George Smith?TL: He’s such a skilful player, he knows where to be at the right time and he leads by example. He’s a back in a back-rower’s body and he’s already contributing a lot in training, helping the development of some of our younger back-rows. We’re lucky he chose us.RW: When you recruit for the Top 14 what do you look for in players?TL: We look at rugby ability but also if they’re decent blokes and whether they’ll adapt (to France). That’s important because I’m striving to create a good culture and a happy group here. I think some Fijians and South Africans, the real Afrikaners, can struggle, unless there are two or three of them. I’m not knocking them but that’s just the way it is because they prefer speaking Afrikaans. That’s why Coenie Basson (Lyon’s South African lock) is so important for us. He speaks fluent English, French and Afrikaans and is a great help in assimilating some of the new blokes in the club.Key figure: South African lock Coenie Basson’s language skills are important at LyonRW: Biarritz and Perpignan relegated, Toulouse no longer a major force. Is there a changing of the guard in French rugby?center_img Lyon coach Tim Lane talks to Rugby World about the challenges of the Top 14, the fall of French flair and a potential Aussie exodus TL: Staying up is the priority. Over the next two or three years we want to build a bigger and better support and sponsorship. Our stadium is being redeveloped, increasing the capacity (to 11,805). We got good crowds last season but I think they were spectators more than supporters. When you go to a place like Bourgoin you see the fans crying and yelling their nuts off for 80 minutes. Our crowd applaud politely, though in our last few games as we closed in on the title they got a lot more behind us and made more noise. Hopefully we’ll see that in the Top 14 because the crowd can really act like a 16th man in France.Don’t miss our Top 14 preview in the September issue of Rugby World, on sale Tuesday 5 August.last_img read more

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Ireland’s journey from despair to triumph against New Zealand

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Cutting edge: Rob Kearney makes a break against New Zealand. Photo: InphoAs the media sat behind glass in the home of the Chicago Bears NFL franchise, the US commentary was played, very different to sitting out in the elements in Lansdowne Road or Twickenham. The commentators marvelled at Kearney’s ability under the high ball describing it as “magical” and saying he was giving Ben Smith “a clinic”.A congratulatory message would later be sent from Kearney’s distant cousin, United States Vice President Joe Biden from the official @VP Twitter account.Then there was captain Rory Best helping to break down the All Blacks pack. His stoic yet crest fallen appearance in the post-match mixed zone in Hamilton was in total opposition to the jovial figure sitting beside Joe Schmidt after Ireland finally ended 111 years of hurt against New Zealand.In the bowels of Soldier Field, Johnny Sexton waved at the media as he filed by, not speaking on this occasion but with a broad smile telling his story. Again, seemingly a world and an era away from Hamilton.Bad memory: Johnny Sexton looks dejected after the 2012 defeat in Hamilton. Photo: Getty ImagesOne of the broadest smiles at the Waikato Stadium back in 2012 came from a 21-year-old Beauden Barrett following his All Blacks debut. Despite being the third-choice out-half during that series, he helped orchestrate that drubbing of Ireland after an early injury to Aaron Cruden. He played with fearlessness and utter joie de vie – unusual from a ten on the international stage.In Chicago, another out-half making his debut from the bench showed a similar fearlessness. Joey Carbery, who moved to Ireland from New Zealand as a child, was on the field for a much shorter spell than Barrett in Waikato but he still impressed.Four-and-a-half years is a long time in sport – Robbie Henshaw was sitting his Leaving Cert exams during that tour to New Zealand to add a little perspective. Yet looking from the outside one cannot help but wonder if the mental resilience needed to close out the game was first sparked by that horrible Hamilton night and later grown by 2013’s close encounter, with Conor Murray, Andrew Trimble, Donnacha Ryan, Cian Healy and Sean Cronin joining Best, Kearney and Sexton as veterans from the Hamilton match-day squad. Best advice: Rory Best talks to his Ireland team after their historic win. Photo: Inpho Did Ireland’s hammering in Hamilton in 2012 lead to the cheering in Chicago in 2016?center_img If you had the supernatural ability to tell both Kiwi and Irish fans back in Hamilton what would transpire at Soldier Field on 5 November 2016, their reply may have been: “How bizarre!”For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. By Kate RowanWhile standing in a dusty car park in the Chicago suburb of Bridgeview, Illinois last Friday night, waiting for a shuttle to the “L” Train – the message “Go Cubs, Go!” digitally displayed on the front of the waiting buses, I was transported to a very different city on the other side of the world.With a population of a little more than 161,000, Hamilton, New Zealand may seem in stark contrast to the American metropolis with 2.7m residents. The bulk of the crowd in the snaking queue post-match were Kiwis in flying form after the Maori All Blacks had ruthlessly cut through the USA Eagles’ defence to win 54-7 and one of the standout players was wing James Lowe, who danced through would-be American tacklers.Lowe, of course, plays for the Hamilton-based Chiefs. So the city had come to mind before a group of young Kiwi fans started to go through the great New Zealand songbook thanks to a portable speaker, starting with OMC’s How Bizarre.Then came a raucous singalong to early 1990s Kiwi cult classic The Exponents’ Why Does Love Do This To Me, which features a chorus repeating the phrase “I don’t know”. As one of the Kiwis shouted “Aw, bro, they always play this at the Waikato Stadium”, I was fully transported back to that small North Island city.Famous field: Chicago’s Soldier Field hosted two big games over the weekend. Photo: Getty ImagesI remember my thoughts echoing the song “I don’t know” when it was played during what would become dubbed the “Hamilton horror show” as Ireland were mercilessly throttled 60-0 by the All Blacks in the third Test of their June 2012 tour.In the context of the upcoming fixture between Ireland and New Zealand the following afternoon – and in the aftermath of Ireland’s historic win – it would have been much more obvious and rational to draw comparison with Ireland’s heart-breaking near-miss at the Aviva Stadium in November 2013.Yet, despite the early exchanges at Soldier Field suggesting that Ireland would fare much better than a 60-0 loss, the memory of that night in Hamilton continued to linger. Perhaps it was because some of the survivors of that dark night for Irish rugby were the men leading the way on the field in Chicago.Rob Kearney was sin-binned in Hamilton after what was a frustrating night for the then European Player of the Year. There had been much debate over Kearney’s inclusion at full-back for the Chicago fixture, but the Leinsterman is one of those special players who has the sort of mindset, combined with natural talent, that can elevate his game to a whole other level under tremendous pressure on the greatest stage.last_img read more

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Italy 15-46 England No need for innovation as England outgun the hosts

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Italy – Tries: Benvenuti, Bellini. Cons: Allan. Pens: Allan.England – Tries: Watson 2, Farrell, Simmonds 2, Ford, Nowell. Cons: Farrell 4. Pens: Farrell. Italy 15-46 England No need for innovation as England outgun their hostsForget your foxes and your outside-of-the-boxers: England just had better beasts than Italy in their first Six Nations bout. When it came to the scrum, the English were better. When it came to finding that extra yard of pace, England had Anthony Watson and Sam Simmonds, who both nabbed a brace of tries. When it came to bullying your way to an opportunity, England had the George Ford-Owen Farrell axis and a big ol’ dollop of Ben Te’o. In short: their good ones were better than Italy’s good ones, and even if they weren’t at the start of a match-up, they had enough burly mates backing them up to ensure they were by the end.Italy had their moments, of course. However, Eddie Jones was left comparing his No 8, Simmonds, to the man who has been terrorising the Top 14 for two seasons, Victor Vito. After racking up 23 tackles, missing none in the process, the Exeter Chief showed a sparkling set of heels to score two rapid tries, his second one lobbing more points on the score sheet to make things look very comfortable. On the other side of the happy camper chart, Italy head coach Conor O’Shea was left considering the possibility of being without the great Sergio Parisse next week, away to Ireland.Sending it on: Sergio Parisse passes off the top of a lineoutThere was a period in the second half, when Mattia Bellini dotted down and the score was dragged up to 15-27 (Tommaso Allan missed the conversion) that Italian hope was audible. However, England are nothing if not blessed with resources. In the first half, their first-choice nine, Ben Youngs went off with a nasty-looking left knee injury, and the fizzing Danny Care came on. So when Italy were on the hustle in the second half, Jones simply nodded to the bench and had George Kruis, Jonathan Joseph and Jack Nowell injected into proceedings.There were seven tries from England, a new-ish looking midfield that performed well and a No 8 who is more “good feet for a big man” than Billy Vunipola’s “he’s just rocked that player like a southbound train.” Next week they face the cavalier, Scarlets-riddled, happy Welsh at Twickenham. The Six Nations is box office when these ties come up.It all began so positively when Watson cantered in off the slick hands from the back-line, that axis of  Ford and Farrell supplying the Bath speedster. He got in unchallenged that time, but three minutes later he was arching around Tommaso Boni, using a hand-off to push himself further ahead, ghost past another and bump in to score in the exact same corner for his second score.Just before the second try, England were cursing their luck with scrum-half  Youngs stretchered off, head in his hands and a sense of dread. Already this Six Nations, nines going down with knee complaints is a talking points. Care, his replacement, also knows what it is like to go off early under Eddie Jones. However, many had wanted the Harlequins scrum-half to dictate England’s tempo anyway.Bullies: England had no problem mixing it up physicallyThree Tommaso’s combined to add  a few bars of of their own tempo for Italy, though. Boni, perhaps keen to prove his physical worth after being pushed aside like an empty plate by Watson, supplied and supported a Bellini run. With clean ball in English territory, fly-half Allan was in the centre of things as Jonny May crept inwards, away from his wing. A looped pass over his head to Tommaso Benvenuti sent the Italy winger towards the line to score. England had the power, pace and set-piece to see off Italy in their opening Six Nations clash, in Rome. There were also standout performances from England’s midfield, Anthony Watson and Sam Simmonds. center_img Respite was brief. While Italy can bide their time and eventually eke out an opening, England can be relentless when the mood takes them. And they’ll greedily eat up your opportunities. With 32 minutes gone and the score art 17-7 to England’s favour, the hosts get a penalty just beyond the opposite 10m line. With Allan not trusted to go for the poles, Italy opted for the corner. And the English bullied the attempted drive into touch.LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSRight back down the English end, there was more Italian pressure, but England twice gave away penalties within spitting distance of their line. This is intended as a favourable comparison: England look to be becoming as efficiently cynical near their own line as the All Blacks have been for some time. Stop them crossing, whatever it takes. Eventually, just shy of the half-time whistle, the Azzurri had to satisfy themself with just three points. It is an English stinginess that slowly widens the scores between sides, especially with England continuing to feed the bears.Just in: Bellini managed to squeeze in to scoreBoni – an hula hoop of movement all game – thought he had finagled his way through the English defence, but Allan slipped him a forward pass. At the other end, England punted a penalty to touch and from the drive Simmonds was able to slip off the back with Italian forwards gawping, frozen, as he darted through to score. It was the try bonus wrapped up.England were at the bloody-minded stuff again on their own line. They pulled down a maul and the from another penalty, with England piling into the Italian drive, it eventually slowed to a halt. But with Maro Itoje lying awkwardly in the way on their other side. not that it perturbed the hosts, who zipped it wide left to Bellini who absorbed a Mike Brown hit as he slid on his knee into the corner and just got the ball down in time. Allan could not make the conversion from that far left and England went through the gears again.Smart axis: Owen Farrell paired well with his midfield colleaguesIf the resistance was never broken it was at least badly bruised, with England claiming another three tries. Farrell and Ford combined again for the latter to scuttle in for a score, England’s fifth. Boni threatened to break free after Farrell telegraphed an interception, but the centre was shackled and it was back to the business of tries. Simmonds got his brace and just to add to Devon’s pleasure, fellow Exeter Chief Jack Nowell got in on the act at the right corner. Farrell missed the conversion from touch – the third he sent astray from out wide. Burst of speed: Sam Simmonds scores one of his two tries last_img read more

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Scrapping Premiership relegation would have positive effect argues Ben Ryan

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS We have had some great end-of-season weekends – the Harlequins relegation weekend in 2005 was a real cliffhanger – but it’s not a common occurrence.Silver service: Exeter won the title seven years after being promoted (Getty Images)Not many people liked it when the Premiership changed from ‘first past the post’ to the play-off system to decide who would be champions, but it works brilliantly and maintains the excitement.Now a solution is needed at the other end of the table to protect the promoted clubs, to increase the chances of young players getting Premiership game time and to allow the shackles to at least be loosened, if not completely shaken off, so they play a more expansive style that pushes the boundaries technically and mentally and not as much physically.Perhaps change the points system to make it more attack-minded – a winning bonus point for scoring three more tries than the other team; keep the four-try losing bonus point but award two points if a losing team scores six tries; have ‘jokers’ where teams choose one game a season that is worth double points.Also, put pressure on the lawmakers to stop making the breakdown a place of carnage and introduce a law that stops sides from kicking penalties to touch.I get those who don’t want to shut the door and I understand those who are anti-relegation. The real answer may be somewhere in the middle. WATCH: Vince Aso Scores Gravity-Defying Try For Hurricanes Expand Super Rugby 2018 Explained Downbeat: London Irish are the favourites to be relegated this season (Getty Images) WATCH: Vince Aso Scores Gravity-Defying Try For Hurricanes… Ben Ryan guided Fiji to gold at the 2016 Rio Olympics and is Rugby World magazine’s resident columnist. Read his views every month in the magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Without relegation you wouldn’t get as much reliance on proven overseas players either. Younger British players would get more of a chance and that would help accelerate their experience for their club and national sides.I love seeing amazing overseas talent in the Premiership and I know there are English-qualified player quotas, but too many young players still don’t play enough rugby because they aren’t given a chance in the top flight. With less pressure, clubs may be happier to release players for national programmes like the U20s and sevens too.The cost to those clubs trying to get into the Premiership and then trying to stay in is huge. Exeter rose through the ranks smartly, but on the flip side we see clubs break themselves financially or overly rely on a benefactor. For every Exeter, there is a London Welsh. If London Irish don’t avoid the drop, what will happen to them next season?An argument put forward by those in favour of relegation is that removing it would mean dead-rubber games at the end of the season. That’s happened a fair bit recently anyway as clubs get relegated earlier than the closing weeks and it’s more depressing to watch a club that’s already relegated being stripped apart in front of your eyes. There are team changes, rule changes and a… Collapse Super Rugby 2018 Explained WATCH: Vince Aso Scores Gravity-Defying Try For Hurricanes Expand Tongan-born winger has made a sublime start to… The debate surrounding Aviva Premiership relegation goes on, with a top-flight closed shop now back on rugby’s agenda. Here are the thoughts of former Fiji Sevens coach Ben Ryan Hosea Saumaki Causing A Stir For Sunwolves Scrapping Premiership relegation would have positive effect argues Ben RyanRelegation from the Aviva Premiership divides people. It’s not quite ‘Wars of the Roses’ but it seems people have a black or white outlook on it – no grey to be seen. Here is my take on why scrapping relegation would have a positive effect, with a particular lean towards performance.As yet, no club that has come into the Premiership, with the exception of Exeter, has been anything other than risk-averse. I’ve seen teams come up and try to play the same as everyone else. There are some contrasts but I haven’t seen anyone really try to do it differently, to play a game less based on power and more on dexterity.Everyone does tonnes of analysis on each other, but instead they could be coming up with new ideas on the field or surprise moves that no one could have analysed.One of the major reasons for this is the fear of relegation. Of course, you could see it as an exciting challenge, but that’s not happening – and it’s not because coaches and players are unable to think to that level of creativity or improve players with amazing core skills. I think it’s the landscape. The reason Super Rugby is so much less conservative than the Premiership is that the spectre of relegation isn’t hanging over teams. Hosea Saumaki Causing A Stir For Sunwolveslast_img read more

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Leinster v Racing 92 Champions Cup final preview

first_imgAll you need to know ahead of the Champions Cup final between Leinster and Racing 92 in Bilbao LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Leinster v Racing 92 Champions Cup final preview Leinster will be aiming to equal Toulouse’s record of four European Cup titles when they take to the field in Bilbao on Saturday night – and if they are triumphant they will emulate Saracens’ achievement of winning all nine games in a single campaign.Leinster’s previous triumphs came in 2009, 2011 and 2012, and their current head coach Leo Cullen started as captain in all three finals. Cian Healy, Johnny Sexton, Isa Nacewa and Devin Toner were also in the match-day line-ups for those victories and all four start in this year’s final.Sidelined: Maxime Machenaud has been ruled out of the final by injury (Getty Images)Standing in their way are Racing 92, who are playing in their second Champions Cup final having lost to Saracens in 2016. They are without talismanic scrum-half Maxime Machenaud, who is also their regular goalkicker, due to injury, but any side that can afford to keep All Blacks Dan Carter and Joe Rokocoko on the bench is dangerous.They are also the only team in the Top 14 to concede fewer than 500 points in the regular season so Leinster will need to work hard to break down that defence.How did the two teams reach this stage?Leinster won all six of their pool games – impressive when the group included Exeter, Montpellier and Glasgow. They knocked out defending champions Saracens with a 30-19 win in the quarter-finals and overcame Scarlets 38-16 in the semis.In contrast, Racing lost two of their pool games – to Munster and Castres – but then won away at Clermont (28-17) in the last eight before beating Munster 27-22 in the semi-finals.What have the players said?Leinster back-row Dan Leavy: “Racing are a great team and are packed full of big names. The strength in depth is incredible and they have the best defence in the Top 14. If we are going to beat them, we will need to find that extra gear against them”Middle man: Dan Leavy in action in the semi-final win over Scarlets (Getty Images)Racing 92 back-row Yannick Nyanga: “We have the firepower to worry any team. But what we want to do is not only to worry them, but to beat them. I hope to return home with a big smile on my face, holding the trophy! Only victory will satisfy us.” Any interesting statistics?When these two clubs met in the pool stage in 2010-11, Leinster won both matches.Leinster have averaged more tries per Champions Cup game than any other side this season – 3.8.Both teams have tight defences, conceding on average 1.8 tries a game.Racing’s Fijian lock Leone Nakarawa has made eight more offloads than any other player in the Champions Cup this season with 20. He is also the only player from either side to have played every minute of their eight games to date.Pass master: Leone Nakarawa is known for his offloads (Getty Images)Luke McGrath’s six try assists are more than any other player in the Champions Cup.Johnny Sexton has a 100% goalkicking record in this season’s knockout stages, slotting 11 from 11 – seven conversions and four penalties.Related: Leone Nakarawa is third best player in the worldWhen does it kick off and is it on TV?Bilbao’s San Mamés Stadium is hosting this year’s Champions Cup final, which will kick off at 4.45pm in the UK and Ireland (5.45pm in Spain). It is being televised live on both BT Sport and Sky Sports.The officials are all English with Wayne Barnes the referee and JP Doyle and Tom Foley his assistants.Triumphant: Leo Cullen and Shane Jennings lift the trophy in 2012 (Getty Images)What are the line-ups?LEINSTER: Rob Kearney; Jordan Larmour, Garry Ringrose, Robbie Henshaw, Isa Nacewa; Johnny Sexton, Luke McGrath; Cian Healy, Sean Cronin, Tadhg Furlong, Devin Toner, James Ryan, Scott Fardy, Dan Leavy, Jordi Murphy.Replacements: James Tracy, Jack McGrath, Andrew Porter, Rhys Ruddock, Jack Conan, Jamison Gibson-Park, Joey Carbery, Rory O’Loughlin.RACING 92: Louis Dupichot; Teddy Thomas, Virimi Vakatawa, Henry Chavancy, Marc Andreu; Pat Lambie, Teddy Iribaren; Eddy Ben Arous, Camille Chat, Cedate Gomes Sa, Donnacha Ryan, Leone Nakarawa, Wenceslas Lauret, Bernard Le Roux, Yannick Nyanga.center_img On target: Johnny Sexton has kicked all his goals in the knockout stages this year (Getty Images) Replacements: Ole Avei, Vasil Kakovin, Census Johnston, Boris Palu, Baptiste Chouzenoux, Antoine Gibert, Dan Carter, Joe Rokocoko.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

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Hotshot: Glasgow fly-half Ross Thompson

first_img Glasgow fly-half Ross Thompson Date of birth 10 April 1999 Born Edinburgh Position Fly-half Club Glasgow Warriors Country ScotlandWhen did you first play rugby? Three or four – as soon as my dad could get me into it! That was mini rugby at Stew Mel Lions on a Sunday, then I moved to Stewart’s Melville from 12 or 13.Did you play any other sports? I played a lot of football and some racket sports as well, badminton. But it was mainly rugby and football, which I stopped at 16.What positions have you played? Centre until I was 16, then I moved to fly-half and I’ve been there ever since.What are your strengths? Kicking is a big one, and my distribution. I’m always working on my defence and my running game. I want to be a bit more dominant in the tackle and a threat with ball in hand.When did you link up with Glasgow Warriors? I came across to Glasgow for uni and joined Glasgow Hawks. A teacher knew Fin Gillies, the coach at the time, and put us in touch, and he really helped me a lot. Glasgow’s Ross Thompson kicks at goal (SNS Group/Getty Images) On the back of a couple of games for Hawks I trained with Glasgow a couple of times and after that, in my second year of uni, I became a Stage Three academy player.Are you still studying? Yes. It’s taking five years to do a four-year course as I went part-time so did two years over three years due to the increase in rugby. I’m doing law. I enjoy it; it’s something quite different outside of rugby.How have you found the step up to the Pro14? Really good. I’m lucky with the players I’ve had around me – it’s made it a lot easier. There are great stand-offs here, so I pick up little things from them.Who was your childhood hero? Chris Paterson was one. When I played centre, I looked up to Brian O’Driscoll. He was never the biggest but he was pretty skilful and that’s what I strive to be.What are your long-term goals? I want to push on here and get as much experience as I can. I’d love to play for Scotland one day as well.RW Verdict: His grandad (cricket) and uncle (rugby league) played for Scotland, while his cousin, Kirsty Gilmour, (badminton) has won two Commonwealth Games medals. His Pro14 form suggests Thompson is destined for success too. There is a strong sporting pedigree to the Warriors No 10’s family and now he’s excelling in the Pro14center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS This article originally appeared in the May 2021 edition of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

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Mike Blair names 17 uncapped players for Scotland summer Tests

first_img Glasgow’s Rory Darge in Rainbow Cup action (Getty Images) Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. As well as Lions call-up, other names not included are senior stars Fraser Brown, Stuart McInally, and Jonny Gray who will all enjoy a rest over the summer.Scotland will choose from the 37 to face England A away on 27 June, and then a smaller group will head out for the Romania and Georgia Tests on 10 and 17 July.Forwards: Ewan Ashman (Sale Sharks), Nick Auterac (Northampton Saints), Josh Bayliss (Bath), Simon Berghan (Edinburgh), Jamie Bhatti (Bath), Magnus Bradbury (Edinburgh), David Cherry (Edinburgh), Alex Craig (Gloucester), Luke Crosbie (Edinburgh), Scott Cummings (Glasgow Warriors), Rory Darge (Glasgow Warriors), Matt Fagerson (Glasgow Warriors), Cameron Henderson (Leicester Tigers), Robin Hislop (Doncaster Knights), Jamie Hodgson (Edinburgh), Oli Kebble (Glasgow Warriors), Kiran McDonald (Glasgow Warriors), Jamie Ritchie (Edinburgh), Javan Sebastian (Scarlets), Sam Skinner (Exeter Chiefs), Grant Stewart (Glasgow Warriors), George Turner (Glasgow Warriors).Backs: Jack Blain (Edinburgh), Jamie Dobie (Glasgow Warriors), Cole Forbes (Glasgow Warriors), Adam Hastings (Glasgow Warriors), George Horne (Glasgow Warriors), Damien Hoyland (Edinburgh), Blair Kinghorn (Edinburgh), James Lang (Harlequins), Rufus McLean (Glasgow Warriors), Matt Scott (Leicester Tigers), Charlie Shiel (Edinburgh), Scott Steele (Harlequins), Kyle Steyn (Glasgow Warriors), Ross Thompson (Glasgow Warriors), Sione Tuipulotu (Glasgow Warriors).Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The interim head coach names group to face England A, Romania and Georgia Mike Blair names 17 uncapped players for Scotland summer TestsScotland have named a 37-man squad for Test matches against England A, Romania and Georgia this summer. Edinburgh back-rower Jamie Ritchie has been listed as captain with Stuart Hogg on his way to South Africa with the British & Irish Lions, and there are 17 uncapped players named. Assistant coach Mike Blair takes charge of the national team with head coach Gregor Townsend away with the Lions and does so without eight regulars, who are also off to South Africa. The uncapped players are Glasgow Warriors Rory Darge, Jamie Dobie, Rufus McLean, Sione Tuipulotu, Kiran McDonald, Cole Forbes and Ross Thompson. Edinburgh see Luke Crosbie, Charlie Shiel, Jack Blain and Jamie Hodgson involved. Bath back-rower Josh Bayliss is there, as is Ewan Ashman of Sale Sharks, Northampton Saints prop Nick Auterac, Javan Sebastian of Scarlets, Robin Hislop of Doncaster Knights, and Leicester Tiger Cameron Henderson. Captain material @Jamie_T_Ritchie pic.twitter.com/98JZdQQu3s— Scottish Rugby (@Scotlandteam) June 1, 2021last_img read more

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‘Back door’ leads to vocation in liturgical design, priesthood

first_img September 14, 2015 at 2:39 pm Cindy. After reading this article I was filled with pride, love and support for you. Dad gave me the same speech and I know it made me a strong, determined woman too. I admire your commitment to your church and faith in your causes, especially the rights of gay priests to perform equally in your church. I follow your career, Cindy, wanted or not, and I wish you well. Your sister, Sandra Evans. Submit a Job Listing Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC April 2, 2012 at 11:58 am Way back before women were priests in the Episcopal Church, I broke male ranks in two churches by becoming the first female lay reader. In the first the senior warden told me one morning to put on his robe, take his place in the procession, and go read. Sometimes it does take determination. Hooray for the men who care enough to give their very best and the women willing to accept it. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel March 30, 2012 at 8:46 pm Amen! Let’s do it! Frances Trott says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Mary W. Cox says: March 31, 2012 at 4:41 pm For those who would like to pray using inclusive and expanded language which stays as close as possible to that of the 1979 Book of Common Prayer in its version of the Psalms, prayers, canticles, and collects, may I suggest the Saint Helena Psalter, and the Saint Helena Breviary–both the monastic and personal editions. The sisters revised and prayed the revisions, along with visiting priests and lay people, for many years before publication, with the intention of making them available to all in the wider Church who desire a graceful blend of the organization and beauty of the BCP, the expansion of Enriching Our Worship, and contemporary theology. The website for the Order of St Helena, http://www.osh.org, contains detailed information about these books. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN Comments are closed. April 2, 2012 at 2:42 pm Nicely-written story, Sharon. I certainly identify with Cindy’s experience in her early years and admire her grace. I would add to one of her quotes, however. I do think the Episcopal Church has a brilliant spokesperson speaking to the issues of the day – the Presiding Bishop, the first female primate in the Anglican Communion. Sandi Evans says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Comments (10) Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service March 31, 2012 at 2:09 am “Voorhees was ordained to the diaconate in 2004, the priesthood in 2005. She an assistant at St. John’s ProCathedral in Los Angeles but continues her work through her business, Voorhees Design. Most of the top liturgical consultants in the country are ordained priests, she noted.”I wonder whether seeing laity as serious and potentially among the top liturgical consultants could be another “stained glass ceiling” ready to burst under the weight of spiritual gifts above it and a vacuum below. Liturgy is the “work of the people,” after all. Ann Magaret Prentice, OSH says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books center_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Albany, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group March 31, 2012 at 9:04 am What a wonderful story, Cindy, of your endurance and perseverance. It parallels my own in some interesting ways–even though I am significantly older than you. As a young child, I wanted to be an acolyte and have a more active role liturgically in “my” Lutheran church–and finally did go to Gettysburg seminary when I was in my late 40s. Yet I was never really accepted as a Lutheran pastor anywhere until 2002, when, after the Call to Common Mission was in place, I agreed to serve as interim rector for our neighborhood Episcopal church. That wonderful experience began my journey to my becoming an Episcopal priest in 2009–and I have never been happier in my life. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Hopkinsville, KY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL March 31, 2012 at 11:14 am Great story, Sharon! I’ve linked to this on my Facebook page and may link it to the diocesan page, too, so more people can have an introduction to Cindy’s work. Sarah Dylan Breuer says: Solange De Santis says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Rev. Gretchen R. Naugle says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Smithfield, NC Frances Takis says: By Sharon SheridanPosted Mar 30, 2012 Rector Martinsville, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Charles Sacquety says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA April 8, 2012 at 5:22 am Great story and your work in Swaziland has been greatly appreciated. You have given so many women courage to do their work and aim high. Thanks for everything you do for all the Swazis Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA ‘Back door’ leads to vocation in liturgical design, priesthood March 31, 2012 at 10:45 am Cindy, your story strikes chords over and over with mine–early desire put down with a “loving” statement of “Girls can’t do that;” years of doing all the things girls could do with propriety (even pushing the boundaries just a bit by picking up our fathers’ tools and using them well); faithfully serving God in pew and choir stall and sacristy until one day in my mid-40s the light dawns that the long-desired door to the altar is finally, actually open. Sixteen years of active priestly ministry in churches small and large have now given way to retirement for me…and oddly, once again, there is a sense of searching for where I belong in the Church. The journey never ends.Thank you for a well-told story, Sharon; and thank you, Cindy, for your beautiful designs and vision. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Tampa, FL Mollie Douglas Turner+ says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Belleville, IL The Lazarus Chapel at the Cathedral Center of St. Paul in the Diocese of Los Angeles as redesigned by Cindy Voorhees.[Episcopal News Service] This is one of a series of articles ENS is publishing during Women’s History Month.As a liturgical designer and builder of churches, the Rev. Canon Cindy Evans Voorhees knows the ins and outs of entrances and exits, apses and naves. But in her vocation, it’s the back door she’s found particularly useful.The Lazarus Chapel before it was redesigned.“I happen to navigate the field of women’s equality by ‘back-dooring’ every time: OK, I’ll find a way,” she said.While today she is an Episcopal priest in the Diocese of Los Angeles, she wasn’t allowed to be an acolyte while growing up in what now is the Evangelical Lutheran Church of America. “I asked, and they just kind of said, ‘Oh, no, just the boys.’”“I didn’t get angry. It was just the way things were,” she said.Wishing to play baseball in grade school, she was told girls didn’t play baseball; they were cheerleaders. Instead, she became “an excellent tether ball player.”Cindy Voorhees“I was always very athletic. I never let my female body hold me back, but I think at times the world did. I would just go around.”Her father, a sociologist and master carpenter, told her: “No daughter of mine is going to be a secretary. You’re not taking home ec and typing. … If you know those things, that’s what they’re going to ask you to do.”“I took wood shop, auto shop, metal shop and drafting,” she said. “I was actually a teacher’s aide in college in metal shop and wood shop at a local junior high … My father was always pulling me into the garage, building things. I always like to say I can swing a mean hammer.”Entering college, “I just assumed I’d go right into architecture classes.” But when she inquired, “the professor said no, I would just disrupt his class as a girl.“So I went over to the art department and majored in fine art. My first job was in the design and construction department of a major furniture firm.”In 1985, she said, “the president fired everyone in the department and told me to get ready to build buildings, and then I switched companies and built buildings there.” She earned a general contractor’s license and, self-taught, passed tests to become a certified interior designer. “I became a designer, became a contractor, and 20 years into it, people just called me an architect.”She moved from California to Texas to Washington, D.C., to Chicago and finally back to California, where she now lives in Huntington Beach. When she was leaving Chicago, the pastor at the nondenominational church she was attending wrote ahead to the pastor at a church in California. When she arrived in 1990, the pastor asked her to make an appointment to see him. “I walked in, and he had the blueprints there and said, ‘Would you build me a church?’”That’s where she met her future design partner, liturgical consultant Walter Judson of Judson Studios, who mentored her until his death 10 years later. That launched her own career in liturgical design. She’s been involved in projects at more than 300 churches, plus some synagogues and one Hare Krishna temple.A window honoring St. Julian of Norwich in the church of the Cathedral Center of St. Paul, Diocese of Los Angeles, is shown here in Cindy Voorhees’ original rendering.“This is a vocation,” she said. “A typical designer off the street could not do church design. It’s a long time of education on what each denomination wants – their customs, their rituals. You have to learn the language of each denomination or non-denomination. You have to know their government, whether it’s a session or a vestry or a council or the elders. … It takes extreme patience to work with committees and congregations processing change.”Meanwhile, Voorhees had left the Lutheran Church and had been attending nondenominational churches.“When I was little, probably 8 or 9, I kept looking at the pulpit going, ‘I think I am supposed to be up there,’” she said. “The Lutheran model of a pastor … wasn’t the right fit for some reason. I let it go and went on to college. You get on with life.”After she began designing churches, she started having “weird feelings, like God knocking on the door. I remember wondering why I had this feeling that I was being drawn to the altar, the pulpit.”In 1993, she walked into St. Wilfrid of York Episcopal Church in Huntington Beach, where a female priest was celebrating Eucharist. “A flood of emotions hit me like a ton of bricks.” She realized: “that’s the call, the priesthood. … I remember sitting there in the pew sobbing.”“And then I ran from it for about five years,” she said. “Finally my spiritual director said, ‘I think you’d better enter the [discernment] program.’”Voorhees was ordained to the diaconate in 2004, the priesthood in 2005. She an assistant at St. John’s ProCathedral in Los Angeles but continues her work through her business, Voorhees Design. Most of the top liturgical consultants in the country are ordained priests, she noted.More than 35 years after General Convention approved women’s ordination to the priesthood, Voorhees still sees a “stained-glass ceiling” in the Episcopal Church.“That glass ceiling is not going to break until the image of God is not solely male, because as Christ’s representative on earth, as the priest we’re still using male imagery to represent that image,” she said. The “ceiling” won’t shatter until “we really start using inclusive language and really modeling and teaching that God is not some man with a white beard up in heaven,” but rather that God is “neither male nor female,” she said. “It probably isn’t going to happen in the near future, and that’s why I continue to walk the line in history as a female priest, modeling the priesthood as wholly male and female. We need both to be complete.”“I may never see complete equality,” she said. “I’m just a humble priest, doing my part to walk along and do my part in history for the priesthood – not women, but for the priesthood, to make it a complete priesthood. And that’s okay.”“We can support the image of God as male and female through the arts,” she added, “through the stained glass, through the icons, through the sculpture imagery.”She designed the stained glass at St. Paul’s Cathedral Center in Los Angeles, including images of Julian of Norwich, Hildegard and Teresa of Avila and an icon at the altar of women around the crucified Christ. “It was very intentionally designed with women in mind, and that was wonderful that [Bishop Diocesan J. Jon Bruno] did that.”Working in so many churches has given Voorhees a global perspective on the challenges facing the Episcopal Church and how “it’s a very similar plight right now” across denominational lines. In an increasingly secular culture, she said, the church’s evangelism language and strategy must be “completely revamped and modernized.”Apple now uses the term “evangelist” for its sales team and calls its stores “Apple chapels,” she said. “Apple is its own religion, and we’re kind of losing ground … We’re not reaching [average people] where they are right now. It’s a pretty hurting world, and we keep thinking everyone is going to come in our doors.”“We need some charismatic spokesperson that can really speak to the media and speak to the issues of the day, and in a very candid way,” who will become the Episcopal Church’s “go-to” person for news outlets such as CNN that currently focus on asking evangelical men for religious viewpoints, she said.“We need to embrace technology,” she continued. She’d like to see bishops and churches keep contact via Skype and apps and games and stories and films designed “so that they can be used on iPads in every nursery and Sunday school, because that’s what the kids are going to be using.”Other ideas for revitalizing the church include electing more Episcopal government officials and moving the church center to Washington, D.C., closer to the “heartbeat of government and shaping policy”; investing in leadership and evangelism training; and teaching tithing, she said. “We have to raise up our brightest and best leaders and help them set the vision in the church.”And, she said, the church must “re-brand and remarket” and “take our message to the street.“We have to go into the highways and byways. They’re not coming in.”“To me, the Episcopal Church is what most people are looking for,” she said. “They just don’t know who we are.”— Sharon Sheridan is an ENS correspondent.En español: http://bit.ly/I2BJjRlast_img read more

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