Economic Reality May Finally Kill Proposed Carmichael Coal Project

first_imgEconomic Reality May Finally Kill Proposed Carmichael Coal Project FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The Guardian:Adani’s coal-fired power business has reported more heavy losses, prompting the Indian conglomerate to announce it would shift away from using expensive imported coal.Analysts say the fourth-quarter financial results for Adani Power, a subsidiary of the Adani group, showed the proposed Carmichael mega-mine in Queensland was no longer a viable proposition.Remarkably in the context of the Carmichael project, the billionaire Adani Group boss, Gautam Adani, acknowledged in a statement that the cost of importing coal to India had contributed to Adani Power’s struggles.“We expect to receive [domestic coal] for the Tiroda and Kawai plants in the near future, which will help reduce fuel costs and improve profitability of these projects,” he said. “Under-recovery of fuel costs for Mundra project have impacted its financial viability, and we are in dialogue with key stakeholders for an early solution.”The Mundra power plant, which operates on imported coal, was the planned destination for the spoils from the Carmichael project. After Mundra fell into financial trouble, Adani attempted unsuccessfully to sell the plant. It has not operated since February. The Indian financial services company Edelweiss said Adani Power was “on thin ice” and doubted whether Mundra would reopen.Tim Buckley, an analyst for the pro-renewables Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, said Gautam Adani “didn’t become one of the wealthiest man in India by throwing good money after bad on bad projects. The result reconfirms the point IEEFA has made repeatedly. [Adani Power] is unable to provide a viable nor bankable coal offtake agreement for…the Carmichael proposal.”Adani told Guardian Australia the company was “100% committed to the Carmichael project”. “There has been no change to our marketing strategy. India will remain the key market for Carmichael coal,” the company said in a statement. More: Adani Losses Prompt Mining Company To Shift Away From Imported Coallast_img read more

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E.ON to build major wind farm in Sweden

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享CNBC:German utility E.ON is to build what it describes as one of Europe’s “largest onshore wind farms.”In an announcement Friday, the business said it had decided to invest in the 475-megawatt Nysater wind project in Sweden. The facility will be built jointly with Credit Suisse Energy Infrastructure Partners (CSEIP).E.ON is to build and operate the project through a “long-term” operations and maintenance agreement, and will retain a 20 percent equity stake in the development. Total investment comes to approximately 500 million euros ($566.4 million).“It is part of our strategy to expand our position for onshore wind energy in Europe,” Anja-Isabel Dotzenrath, CEO of E.ON Climate and Renewables, said in a statement. “Nysater means a significant expansion of our Scandinavian portfolio,” Dotzenrath added.E.ON said its new project is situated in the Vasternorrland district of Sweden, an area the company described as having “excellent wind conditions.” Construction is slated to begin this year and it’s expected the facility will be finished by the end of 2021. It will use 114 turbines from Nordex, a German manufacturer.More: E.ON announces plans to build large onshore wind farm in Sweden E.ON to build major wind farm in Swedenlast_img read more

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TVA’s Johnson: Utility’s coal plant closures make economic sense

first_imgTVA’s Johnson: Utility’s coal plant closures make economic sense FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Reuters:The chief executive of Tennessee Valley Authority said on Thursday the U.S.-owned power generator will keep cutting carbon emissions in future years after replacing much of its coal-fired fleet with plants run on natural gas, nuclear and renewables.Since Bill Johnson took the reigns as CEO in 2013, TVA has spent $15 billion to modernize its generating fleet, reduced carbon emissions by retiring coal units, and cut debt by $3.5 billion, all while keeping consumer electric prices basically flat for six years.“Carbon emissions are now down to 50 percent below 2005 levels. I predict CO2 will fall to 60 percent below 2005 levels by 2020/2021 and 70 percent by the end of the next decade,” Johnson told Reuters in an interview.The company continued to shut coal-fired units over the past two years despite efforts by U.S. President Donald Trump to prop up the coal industry by sweeping away former President Barack Obama’s climate change regulations, like the Clean Power Plan.Johnson said TVA shut old coal plants for economic reasons. “We have reduced carbon emissions simply by doing what is the most efficient and effective way to serve our customers,” Johnson said, noting the low cost of gas in recent years has made it more economic for TVA to build a new gas-fired power plant than refurbish a 60-year old coal unit.Over Johnson’s tenure, TVA’s generating mix transitioned from 41 percent coal and 12 percent gas in 2012, the year before he became CEO, to 19 percent coal and 20 percent gas in 2018, according to TVA’s federal filings. And TVA may not be done retiring coal plants.More: TVA to keep cutting carbon with natural gas, nuclear power plants: CEOlast_img read more

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Industry group says 90GW of new wind capacity could be installed in Europe by 2023

first_imgIndustry group says 90GW of new wind capacity could be installed in Europe by 2023 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Recharge:The outlook for European wind power is clouded by uncertainty that threatens jobs and the EU’s ambitions for a ‘Green Deal’ to turbocharge climate action on the continent, WindEurope warned.The most likely central scenario of the industry body’s latest mid-term outlook expects Europe to add 90GW of new wind capacity between 2019 and 2023 – 72GW of it onshore – to reach a total of 277GW by then.But WindEurope said the wide variance between the central forecast, and the high and low scenarios on either side shows the huge impact, for better or worse, that key policy decisions will have on the sector’s mid-term fortunes – especially the National Energy and Climate Plans (NECPs) that EU member states have to wrap up by the end of the year, but which have been slammed as lacking ambition in their draft forms.If EU member states turbocharge their NECPs then Europe could see 112GW added. If the NECPs remain unambitious and the type of permitting issues that have choked the market in Germany continue to dog the market, installations could be as low as 67GW.WindEurope CEO Giles Dickson said the policy unknowns are putting the dampers on what should be a buoyant wind power market, given the imperatives of climate change and wind’s highly competitive cost of energy. But the policy headwinds are already taking their toll on national wind auctions, with tenders in Germany, Greece and France all heavily undersubscribed over the last year or so.Governments also need to come up with clear policies to support repowering of the huge amount of European wind nearing the end of its life, Dickson said.More: Europe set to add 90GW of new wind by 2023: WindEuropelast_img read more

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Renewable investments drive strong financial results for Spain’s Iberdrola

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享PV Tech:Iberdrola scored a bullish financial performance in a year when it almost doubled its spending on renewables, delivering Europe’s self-styled largest solar plant in the process.The Spanish utility giant managed last year to pass the €10 billion (US$10.8 billion) EBITDA mark and boost annual net profits by 13% to €3.4 billion (US$3.7 billion), according to financial results released on Wednesday.Iberdrola’s jump in profits in 2019 came as, over the year, its revenues rose 3.9% to €36.4 billion (US$39.1 billion) and its shares on the Madrid stock exchange swelled from €6.9 (US$5.2) to €9.2 (US$10). The boost also took place as the firm invested €8.16 billion (US$8.8 billion) all in all in 2019, up 32% on 2018.At 41%, nearly half of every euro spent by Iberdrola in 2019 went into renewables, which bagged €3.34 billion (US$3.63 billion) from the utility. The green energy funding, a full 85% jump on what Iberdrola had spent in 2018, was chiefly split between the U.S., the U.K. and Spain.The profitability decline for Iberdrola’s green energy assets in 2019 contrasted with its record of buoyant installations. As of the end of December 2019, the utility boasted 31.9GW of renewable capacity delivered worldwide, a 9.4% jump on the 29.1GW it had posted one year prior.[José Rojo Martín]More: Iberdrola’s net profits rise by 13% as green energy investment surges Renewable investments drive strong financial results for Spain’s Iberdrolalast_img read more

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J.P. Harris Old School Country

first_imgJ.P. Harris and his country road show keep alive  the traditions of a grand musical genre.Three things strike me about J.P. Harris – his beard, which is big, the rich timbre of his voice, and his commitment to the traditions of the Golden Age of country music. Not even thirty years of age, J.P. Harris and his band, The Tough Choices, are criss crossing the highways and byways of this country – they have played from coast to coast in just the last couple months – playing music that is three plus decades old. J.P.’s music is pedal steel and cigarette smoke, chicken wire and scuffed bar room floors, not the processed pablum that dominates modern country radio.  J.P. just released his first record, I’ll Keep Calling, and Trail Mix features the title track this month.  I recently caught up with J.P. to chat about the new record and good country music.BRO – At its core, what makes a great country song?JP – It’s funny that you would ask that, as I was just thinking about this while driving around Nashville the other day. I was thinking that the thing that catches everybody about country music is the emotion that is imparted in it. Excitement, crazy wildness, love, anger, despair – there is this whole array of emotion that draws people to country music. And the key to making a good country song is making it simple. It’s kind of like being a preacher man; you have to take a complex emotional concept and simplify it so anyone can access it and understand it. That is truly what is at the heart of a good country songwriter and a good country song. I like to think of a good country song as real good, simple sermon for the people.BRO – Who are your country heroes?JP – The singers and songwriters that I have listened to the most and that have really influenced me are George Jones, Del Reeves, and Merle Haggard. Those three have always had a really good mix of irony, sarcasm, and a good grasp of their singing and how they can pierce a heart with an arrow – how they can really drive something home in a simple way.  George represents to me the untouchable enigma; that guy had one of the worst reputations in country music. He’d fire bands on stage, show up late, show up drunk, just a whole slew of bad judgment. But he was George Jones. That’s what he did. He had the golden voice and the perfect approach. Put him behind a microphone and all of his bad decisions were suddenly forgotten. Merle Haggard was the real deal. He grew up poor – maybe even in a box car – and spent some time in jail, just hard scrabble post-Depression California living. He was fearless in his songwriting. He always wrote edgy material. I admire that he was a rebel. He was never one of these flag-waving Nashville pop country jerk offs. He was making records with Willie Nelson, working with David Allan Coe, and was always sort of a fringe element. And Del Reeves was just a fun loving guy who wrote hysterical songs about girl watching and truck driving. Generally, he was just a super sweet fellow who cared more about being just a country singer. He cared about keeping the old traditions alive when he has television show – he’d bring Jimmy Martin and Bill Monroe out during an era when everything in country music was getting really cheesy. If I could ball bits of these three guys together, I would die a happy man.BRO – You just used the term “Nashville pop country jerk offs.” Should I bother asking you your take on the world of modern country music?JP – I’ve been known to be pretty outspoken about my opinion of modern pop country radio music. I can make some pretty tongue-in-cheek comments about it being filth or garbage, but the truth is that there are some pretty good players out there. I’ve lived in Nashville for a while and have met folks that play with these CMT- grade characters, and these guys and gals are good people. There is some of that stuff I like. Brad Paisley is a killer Telecaster player. But it doesn’t mean I think he is tasteful about what he plays all the time, and it doesn’t mean my opinion on folks like him is going to change that much, because I think they are degrading the name of country music. They are playing rock and roll.  They are playing pop. Just because you sing about drinking or about a truck and you put a cowboy hat on doesn’t mean it is country music. The idea that you can dumb down country music for the masses by melding it with other styles of music to make it popular on the radio is just offensive to me. Take Trace Adkins – he’s a great singer, and he’s funny. But I don’t think I’d ever want to go see him play and I would never go so far as to say he is an authentic country singer. He sings pop country music. In this day and age, there needs to be a real distinction there. Old school country characters that have been playing the music I play for a lot of years, guys like Dale Watson, Ray Wylie Hubbard, Billy Joe Shaver, and Wayne Hancock, never took the poison golden apple. I think these pop country guys could have stayed on the route of real old school country music, stuff that is real and simple, but they all get tempted by the big record deals and fancy mansions. Now, Lord knows I want to get paid real money for what I do, but I don’t feel like sacrificing authenticity and genuineness in my music to do that.  BRO – Is it more about creating a product and less about creating good music?JP – That’s exactly what it is. That’s what really bums me out about the whole thing. The are working on creating an image and an ideal. What these people are doing is preying on everyone’s poor desires. A lot of folks that listen to country music are hard working American people, making a living at the auto garage or answering the phone. And these pop country folks are doing the same thing that glam rock was doing in the 80s. They are wanting these people to believe that if they listen to this music, they’ll get nearly topless girls and big ass F-250s with lift kits and smokestacks, and every once in a while they’ll throw in a line about daddy’s farm. Even if the music is good, the image and lifestyle that these country people are throwing out there is just not right. It’s not accessible.  It’s not something that people are going to attain. But that’s how music has been sold over the last 35 years. Country music was never intended to be that.BRO – Is there anyone out there doing country music the right way?JP – There’s a ton of people out there doing it the right way. The unfortunate part is that there aren’t a lot of us out there on the road doing it, so a lot of people don’t get to hear it and find out about it. Dale Watson and Wayne Hancock have been out there for years. I have just been turned on to Whitey Morgan, and I am really digging what he does. Even stuff in the more indie country and alt-country vein is pretty cool, guys like Ryan Bingham & The Dead Horses. And I love Billy Joe Shaver and Ray Wylie Hubbard. They are still out there beating the pavement. There is a good undercurrent of solid country singers and bands out there touring. And they are doing it for the same reason I am doing it. They believe in the country gospel and have turned their lives into a road show. You have take it from town to town. One of the coolest things I hear at a show is, “You know, I didn’t even know I liked country music because I have never heard real country music.” These other guys I mentioned hear the same thing. That is what these younger guys are really going for – to turn people back on to country music.BRO – Tell me about the new record.JP – Man, I am pretty proud of it. I didn’t know if it was any good by the time I was done with it because I had listened to it about 700,000 times and I had zero objective perspective. But it’s doing really well and we are getting really good feedback about it. After three years of touring with just a little EP, I am happy to have a solid release to show the world what it is I am doing. But I am glad it took this long to get in the studio to get this done. I still have so much to learn about being a country singer and writing country songs. I am glad I was unwillingly forced to wait that long before I could release a record. I know it is better now than it would have been if I had released it a couple years ago.BRO – We are featuring the title track on this month’s Trail Mix. I hope I am not projecting here – or maybe I hope I am projecting – but it sounds like a tune most guys can relate to.JP – Oh, yeah. Guys and gals. I wrote that song about a woman who is still a good friend of mine. We had a short relationship. I was working up in New England working on a barn and staying this little old farmhouse attic and trying to visit this gal on the weekends. I tried calling her one night after a pretty bad day and never got in touch with her. So I just I kept calling this girl and kept getting her answering machine. We all know what drunk dialing is. I’ve done it a time or two in my life, up at 2 A.M. calling that ex-girlfriend from a year ago and sobbing about taking me back. If you haven’t done it, you have at least thought about it. I got to thinking about this idea that you call someone on the phone over and over again and you think they are going to finally answer. You are reaching out to someone, but they don’t have to answer the phone. They don’t have to take you back or tell you that they still love you. Hearing that recorded voice on the other end of the line asking you to leave a message can be one of the worst things to hear when your heart is breaking.J.P. Harris & The Tough Choices are headed west for the month of June, with dates in Louisiana, Texas, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, and Colorado on the schedule. They’ll be back in the Southeast in July. Catch them when you can and, in the meantime, order a copy of the new record at www.ilovehonkytonk.com.last_img read more

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Spring Head-to-Toe from Columbia Sportswear

first_imgColumbia means a lot of things to a lot of different people, from skiers to anglers to backpackers and travelers worldwide. But for springtime in the Blue Ridge, it’s a brand I continually turn to for waterproof, bug-proof, breathable apparel and footwear.Their motto is “Trying Stuff since 1938,” and while simple, it’s a statement not only about the innovation but also the humility with which the company approaches the outdoor market, in an effort to make the outdoors accessible to everyone, and bringing technical products to the market that help people enjoy being outside.  This Spring, Columbia is incorporating its Omni-Freeze ZERO, Omni-Wick EVAP, Insect Blocker and Omni-Shade proprietary technologies across several styles for a head-to-toe kit ideal for southeastern climes. image015The Zero Rules SL gives you a wicking, breathable technical tee for hiking and trail running for under $40, when you can easily spend twice that, and it’s jam packed with features. In a nutshell, the Omni-Freeze ZERO cools the surrounding fabric when it becomes wet, the Omni-Shade UPF 30 blocks the sun’s harmful UV rays, antimicrobial helps reduce the stink factor, and Omni-Wick pulls moisture away from the body and enables perspiration to evaporate more quickly.For hikes, pair it with the Insect Blocker Cargo Pants ($80), also a technical, breathable material but impregnated with Columbia’s Insect Blocker technology to keep ticks and mosquitoes at bay. Throw the Insect Blocker Mesh Jacket ($90) in your pack — and leave it there — for when it gets buggy but you’re too hot to put more clothes on, and don’t want to cover yourself in bug spray.Columbia’s trail shoes are also a shocking value for the money, although these days they compete right up against other top shelf brands; and with the company’s OutDry (a waterproofing technology out of Italy they snatched up lock, stock and barrel two seasons ago for use exclusively in shoes, gloves – and packs in the Mountain Hardwear brand), they are even more competitive. image021The new-for-spring Conspiracy Razor OutDry ($110) are lightweight, waterproof, nimble and soft; while being lugged, welded, and reinforced for performance and durability.Finally, for less than $100 ($99.99 in men’s and women’s), add the new EvaPOURation rain jacket to your kit. It’s a full-featured jacket with pit zips, hood, and simple (versatile) styling that blends Columbia’s Omni-Tech, Omni-Wick Evap, and Omni-Shield tech for a completely waterproof breathable shell.(Click here for an explanation of all of Columbia’s apparel technologies.) col spr 14 imageslast_img read more

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From The Mountains To The Beaches: 5 Easy Coastal Hikes

first_imgWith summertime upon us, we’re trading in our hiking shorts for board shorts and heading to the beaches, but that doesn’t mean we’re going to stop exploring.While our Southeastern coastline is home to beautiful beaches and winding Intracoastal waterways, it also shelters incredible wildlife preserves, state parks, and hiking trails. The elevation change may not be much, but the scenery offers a refreshingly salty change of pace. From tidal marshes and winding boardwalks to greenways and pine forests, our coasts have a little something for everyone. The following trails are all rated as easy hikes, are perfect for the family, and allow the pups on a leash.Photo: Virginia State ParksFirst Landing State Park Trails, VirginiaRanging from shorter three-mile loops to over eight-mile out-and-backs, the trails at the 2,888 acre Frist Landing State Park in Virginia Beach can be pieced together to make it as short or as long as you’d like. With scenic water views, wooded hammocks, and Intracoastal beaches, the park has the perfect mix of the woods and the sea. During your hike, there are a couple beaches that are perfect for you or Fido to take a dip and cool off.Located on the Northern point of Virginia Beach near Cape Henry Lighthouse, the First Landing State Park trail system makes for a quick and easy hike for beachgoers.Photo: North Carolina Coastal FederationPatsy Pond Trails, North CarolinaThe Patsy Pond Nature Trails are located within the massive, 159,000 acre, Croatan National Forest in the middle of North Carolina’s Coast. This trail system consists of three loops ranging from .75 mile to 2 miles and meanders through an old pine forest, grassy marshes, and the banks of several ponds.This massive National Forest is less than a 30-minute drive from many popular North Carolina beach towns like Jacksonville, Atlantic Beach, and Emerald Isle.Photo: South Carolina ParksHuntington Beach State Park Trails, South CarolinaAlligators on one shoreline, sharks on the other, what more could you ask for? Toothy predators aside, the main loop at Hunting Beach State Park is beautiful. At just under three miles long, the trail takes you over a boardwalk, through a coastal forest, across tidal flats, and ends up at the beach. The park is rich in wildlife and features some of the best coastal birdwatching in the Southeast.Located just 30 minutes south of Myrtle Beach, Huntington Beach State Park is a timeless representative of South Carolina’s well preserved upper coastal plain.Photo: Georgia State ParksSkidaway Island Trails, GeorgiaLocated in Skidaway Island State Park, just Southeast of Savannah, this 588-acre state park has six miles of hiking trails to explore. Consisting of everything from island hammocks to tidal creeks, salt flats to alligator ponds, the terrain you’ll cover is as diverse as the wildlife that calls it home.Skidaway Island is less than 30 minutes from Downtown Savannah and is a quick outdoor getaway for folks looking to take a break from the city or the beach.Boneyard Beach TalbotBoneyard Beach on Big Talbot Island, FloridaThat’s right…I said Florida. It may not be a part of the Blue Ridge, but in this post, we’re traveling to the beaches, and in my opinion, Northeast Florida has the best of them. Located in Duval County, Boneyard Beach is on the Eastern edge of Big Talbot Island State Park. This apocalyptic stretch of sand looks like something out of a movie. The skeletal remains of fallen trees line the entire beach, forcing visitors to jump, duck, and crawl their way across the sand. With close parking and easy access, this picturesque stretch of coastline is one of Northeast Florida’s most photographed places.Also known as Driftwood Beach, it is only 30 minutes from I-95, making it an easy pit stop for folks headed south. Winding through windswept Scrub Oaks along the coast, the A1A corridor from Fernandina to Jacksonville is worth the trip alone.Most of us go to the beach to swim, surf, and work on our sweet bronze bods. That’s a given, but keep in mind, you may be able to take the hiker out of the mountains, but you’ll never take the mountains out of the hiker. Next time you’re on the coast, go for a hike.Justin Forrest is an outdoor writer, fly fishing addict, and co-founder of Narrative North—based in Asheville, N.C. He posts pictures of cats and fishing on Instagram sometimes.last_img read more

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8 Vanlife Essentials from the Live Outside and Play Road Team

first_imgThe Live Outside and Play Road Team has been on the road for three years. They’ve had some time to test out their favorite gear. Take a look at this video for their top picks from over the summer. There is one way for this tour to be a reality– our sponsors! Sending a thank you shout out to all of our awesome sponsors that make this tour happen: Sea to Summit, Mountain House, Lowe Alpine, Leki, Big Agnes, Stio, Roofnest, and Franklin County, VA. For more info on our sponsors, check out the post, “Live Outside and Play is Back!” last_img read more

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Chilean, Argentine Presidents Mark Peace Treaty With Pope

first_imgBy Dialogo November 30, 2009 The presidents of Chile and Argentina marked with Pope Benedict XVI the 25th anniversary of a peace treaty signed between the former dictators of their countries with papal mediation. The pope told Michelle Bachelet and Cristina Kirchner that the treaty, which averted a looming border war, showed that “perseverance is always needed … to resolve differences by means of patient negotiations and necessary compromise.” Benedict’s predecessor John Paul II intervened as Argentine dictator Rafael Videla was threatening an invasion of disputed islands in the Beagle Channel, which his Chilean counterpart Augusto Pinochet vowed to resist. After mediation by Cardinal Antonio Samore, a treaty of peace and friendship was signed on November 24, 1984 in Rome, and John Paul II was hailed as the pope of peace when he visited the two countries in 1987. After the audience with Benedict, Bachelet and Kirchner laid a wreath at the late pope’s tomb in Saint Peter’s basilica.last_img read more

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