Lyons Sponsors Campout on the Quad

first_imgLyons Hall will host Campout on the Quad from 8 p.m. tonight until 8 a.m. Saturday, giving students the opportunity to spent a night under the stars for a good cause. Proceeds from the event will be donated to World Vision, a Christian humanitarian organization that will use the money to supply mosquito netting to nations where malaria is a leading cause of death. “I’m looking forward to seeing how people react,” Lyons president Catherine Gillespie said. “This is different than anything I’ve seen on campus.” Gillespie, a sophomore, said the event will feature speakers including Aanuoluwa Adelani, a biology graduate student, who will tell her story of how malaria personally affected her life. Souvik Bhattacharjee, a research assistant professor in biology, will discuss malaria science and research, while Sam Rund, a graduate student in biology, will talk about World Vision and how the proceeds from the event will be used. “The suggested donation of $6 covers the cost of one of the malaria tents given out by World Vision,” Gillespie said. Sophomore Laurel Fischer of Lyons suggested the idea for the event to Lyons Hall Council in April. Fischer said she heard about a similar event at another school and wanted to do something similar at Notre Dame. “We got a lot of positive feedback, so we decided to try to make it a reality,” Gillespie said. World Vision is composed of different sectors, and the money raised from the event will go directly to the End Malaria campaign, which distributes mosquito netting and funds research for testing. “Malaria is one of the leading causes of death for children under five in the developing world, responsible for nearly 2,000 child deaths a day, or one every 40 seconds,” the organization’s website said. “Transmitted by a mosquito, this disease kills an estimated 860,000 people each year. An estimated 85 are children.” Gillespie said World Vision pays for the netting up front, instead of waiting for donations to come through before acting. The donations help pay for charity already underway. Gillespie said the charity was selected because of its Christian humanitarian message. “The event is something anyone can come to — so come by and donate,” Fischer said. “You don’t have to stay overnight if you don’t want to.” There will be events for participants, including a showing of the film “Heavyweights” at midnight, as well as the sale of glow-in-the-dark T-shirts.    “It’s going to a good cause, but you don’t have to feel like you’re getting weighed down by the seriousness of the issue,” Gillespie said. “Come out and have fun.” Fischer said that overall, coordinators of the event want students to come and support the cause in any capacity they can.  “Feel free to come and go as you please,” Fischer said. “It’s very flexible. We just would be happy for people to stop by. We want everyone on campus to stop by.”last_img read more

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Prof. discusses post-grad economy

first_img “Companies try really hard to keep pay scales secret from workers,” Wozniak said. “It does happen within companies that people who enter [the company] at different times have similar jobs but are earning different things.” She said that sometimes, those entering the job force compare their salaries to a sibling’s who started a job a few years earlier. She said to remember not to take salary levels personally. “The scarring effect takes about five to 10 years to overcome, but with this economic situation, it could take a bit longer,” Wozniak said.  “In fact, I think it will take longer.”  “Markets may improve dramatically in a few years, but they may not,” she said. “Even if they do, students who seek to avoid market conditions by staying in school longer will miss out on several years of earnings and advancement, and they will face stiffer competition for graduate school slots and post-graduate school jobs.” “I think it’s important for workers who started in a downturn to continually look for ways to catch up, especially after the economy improves,” she said. “Think more about changing jobs, moving to a new location, or asking for a raise or promotion.” Wozniak said this discrepancy in earnings takes time to overcome.  In addition, it is costly for these workers to adjust to their situation by going back to school, getting a higher degree or switching jobs, Wozniak said.  Wozniak found that the scarring effect was widespread, and moved across different demographic groups.   Research by Abigail Wozniak, Notre Dame assistant professor of economics, determined those who enter the work force during a bad economy will receive lower wages than those who enter during an economic boom, and this negative impact can last up to 10 years. Wozniak said there is a correlation between the state of the economy and job wages. She said higher wages of those who enter the job world during an economic boom stick with them, and lower wages of those who begin their job during a downturn stick with them as well.  The scarring effect is worse for college graduates than it is for high school graduates, Wozniak, said, “probably because they transition from jobs in more of a progression.”center_img College graduates assume they will enter a career and then build that career over the years. Therefore, these workers are likely to stay on a certain job trajectory, making it difficult to overcome the disadvantage they started with.  “The scarring effect is the idea that the conditions you have when you start working will affect your future [occupational achievement],” she said.  She concluded it impacts college graduates, high school graduates, college dropouts or those with two-year degrees, as well as high school dropouts.  “There’s a perception in the U.S. that what you earn exactly [corresponds] to how good you are,” she said. “Students and others as well should recognize that earnings are not driven entirely by individual productivity or ability. A very large component is luck.  It would be wrong to believe you are earning say 10 percent less than a friend or colleague did when she started just because you are not as qualified.” Wozniak also said that firms are not adjusting perfectly to economic changes. Wozniak said it is unclear whether getting a graduate degree and hoping to enter the job market during better economic times will be beneficial to students.  Job change is a major way in which one can overcome the scarring effect, Wozniak said. It is easier for those without a college degree to switch jobs and quickly overcome this negative impact, because they are not as reluctant to start over in a new job.   “My estimates suggest that workers lose six percent of wages for every two additional percentage points of unemployment above the average,” she said. “We’re currently about four percentage points above average, so wages for this year’s graduates will be roughly 12 percent below that of similar graduates from four years ago.” In her research, which will be published in the Journal of Human Resources this fall, Wozniak looked at almost 30 years of data of people entering the labor market. She used census data from 1980, 1990, and 2000, looking at workers five to eight years after they entered the labor force.last_img read more

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Saving the best for last

first_imgWith cold gusts, intermittent rain and a No. 14 ranked opponent in the house, you could forgive Notre Dame seniors for not expecting more than participating in the traditional marshmallow toss during halftime of their final home game as students. But then, the unthinkable happened. Notre Dame upset Utah 28-3, giving the Irish its first Senior Day win since 2007, and the senior class, along with much of the student body, stormed the field. Senior Nick Mancinelli said the amount of people combined with the excitement of running onto the field contributed to one particularly thrilling moment Saturday. “I remember trying to get on the field and at one point I was moving without either of my feet touching the ground,” he said. As a member of the Notre Dame class with the most football losses, Mancinelli had low expectations going into Saturday’s game. But he said the win was the perfect way to cap off his last experience as a member of the student section. “I went into the game very cynical,” he said. “I thought we would be slaughtered. This is the first time in my four years where we won as an underdog.” Mancinelli said ending his time as a member of the student section on such a high note makes up for many of the losses during the past four seasons. He also said the positive atmosphere of the game contrasted to previous games this year. “There was something noticeably different about this game,” Mancinelli said. The entire student body was excited. It reminded me of what Notre Dame football is about. You become jaded after loss after loss. It became fun again.” Senior Kaitie McCabe also said the combination of a final win and rushing the field made up for a lot of the difficulties the class experienced as Fighting Irish fans. “I think it was probably the most perfect way we could have ended our four years of Notre Dame football,” she said. “Despite the rain and everything, it was a great time. Rushing the field was one of the coolest things I have done. “Even though we were the losing-est class during our four years, we rallied and won.” McCabe said the mood of the student section felt much more upbeat for their Senior Day than it had for other games this season, contributing to the excitement of the day. “Especially during this season, we were really upset. But for this game everyone was talking about how they bled for this team,” she said. “We were fighting for the win. It was almost as if we hadn’t lost a lot of the games we did this season.” Sophomore Ethan Bailey, a member of the Notre Dame Band, said he could hear the crowd’s enthusiasm over the band’s music. “During the game there didn’t seem to be downtime,” he said. “Everyone seemed to be actively cheering during the game.” Bailey said ending the season on such a high note was not only great for the Notre Dame student body, but especially the seniors. “You didn’t want to end the season on a bad note. The last home game leaves an impression for the rest of the year,” he said. “It was exciting for the seniors too. It was nice to see them get excited for a game and end their four years like that.” Senior Anna Katter said the halftime marshmallow toss, a Senior Day tradition, was a seemingly light-hearted moment that conveyed the bond the campus of Notre Dame possesses. “It was really hilarious to tape [the marshmallows] to your body. It was fun to whip them out at halftime,” she said. “They were disgusting, but it was great to see a sea of white. It was yet another example of unity and family of our senior class.” Katter said rushing the field also reminded her of the close-knit nature of her class. “It was really cool to just run into people. There was just a sense that everyone was thrilled that we won and were seniors,” she said. “It was great to see people you didn’t normally associate with. It was just a sense of fun. We were all there bonded and united on the field.” Bailey said being on the field before the rush was equally as exhilarating because members of the band are used to select number of students being on the turf after games. “It was really awesome to see everyone trying to climb over from the student section,” he said. “It was funny having friends come up to me after the game on the field. That has never happened before.” McCabe said despite the excitement of being on the field, the throngs of students still had respect for the sentimentality of the experience. “Everyone was really excited to rush the field, but when the Alma Mater came on, it was a reflective moment,” she said. “Everyone stopped amidst the chaos.” Now, in addition to being the losing-est class in history, seniors can add another notch to their belt: “Not many seniors can say the best game was the last game of their four years,” Mancinelli said.last_img read more

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Dismas House celebrates 30th anniversary

first_imgThe Dismas House in South Bend has assisted over 1,000 ex-criminal offenders since 1986, with 101 local college volunteers sharing in their journeys along the way. Dismas House will celebrate its 30th anniversary at a benefit dinner April 13, one of several other anniversary celebrations throughout the year.“Our mission is to facilitate the reconciliation of former prisoners to society and society to former prisoners through the development of a supportive community,” Maria Kaczmarek, Executive Director of South Bend’s Dismas House, said in an email. “Dismas House is a unique place where college students, former prisoners and volunteers come together to create community.”According to Kaczmarek, South Bend’s location is part of a larger nationwide Dismas House nonprofit, which began in 1974.“It is a unique program because former offenders share the house with area college students,” Kaczmarek said, “[It] recognizes that the cycle of crime can be reduced when men and women who have been incarcerated have assistance readjusting to society. To that end, Dismas House provides room and board, case management, bus passes, employment services, life skills counseling, mentoring and programs to help former offenders make a successful transition back into the community.“Returning prisoners need [an] adjustment period when they return home. If they do not receive support, they are high risks to re-offend. They need help with securing medical and dental care. Many need mental health services … and drug and alcohol treatment. Finding and maintaining employment is paramount. Dismas helps with all of these needs.”Kaczmarek said Dismas House also advocates on social justice issues on behalf of ex-offenders.“We hope Indiana will opt out of the federal law that prohibits individuals convicted of a drug offense from receiving [Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits] for life,” she said, “People who have committed far worse crimes, such as rape, can receive SNAP [benefits]. We feel it is morally wrong to deny a person the basic human need of food. Other states have opted out of the federal law that bars those with drug convictions to receive SNAP [benefits]. Also, we would like to see [the] ‘Have you ever been convicted of a felony?’ box removed job applications. This would allow the person to be interviewed and given the opportunity to explain his or her criminal history and to their share skills and talents as they relate to the job.”Kaczmarek said South Bend’s Dismas House is a “century old Victorian house — it is not a facility, it is a home.” It currently houses 12 residents, all of whom commit to participating in their clinic-specific reentry plan for between 90 days and two years. Weekdays, residents attend school or work at jobs. Monday through Thursday, residents gather to eat dinner together “as a family.” The evening meal is prepared by volunteers who dine alongside residents.“[And] like all families, we watch TV, play games, go to the movies, visit with family and friends and have fun,” Kaczmarek said.In addition to providing an in-home family, Dismas House incorporates local college students to add to a rehabilitative community.“We welcome all college students, but Notre Dame students were the first to become involved as residents and volunteer cook(s),” Kaczmarek said. “For 29 years, the men of Keenan Hall have been preparing dinner and eating with the residents every Monday night during the school year. … Also Notre Dame’s Circle K students provide tutoring on Tuesday evenings to residents. Student residency has a major impact on the house. Students are non-judgmental and open-minded. They bring laughter and fun to the house.“ … Because of the presence of students many of our former offenders gain a newfound respect for education, and they decide to enroll in higher education.”Student volunteers gain something from the work with the Dismas House residents, too, said one volunteer.“Dinner always begins with a prayer led by one of the residents, followed by each person at dinner stating their name so that guests feel welcome before the meal is served,” T.J. Groden, a junior in Keenan Hall and Dismas House volunteer, said. “Sharing the meal with the residents is as, if not more, important than preparing it. The conversations I’ve had over dinner at Dismas House have significantly changed my views on our country’s prison system.“Dismas is extremely important because it gives released inmates the second chance that they deserve. The house is much more than a place to live — it is a community that rehabilitates former inmates through its programming. Dismas breaks the cycle that traps many released inmates and pushes them back into incarceration.”Francisco Yang, a sophomore in Keenan Hall and another Dismas House volunteer, said he considers the dinner discussion with the residents as the most important part of Monday dinners at Dismas House.“Prior to Dismas House, I had no prior interaction with anyone who had formerly been incarcerated,” Yang said. “This year I learned that people like the residents at Dismas have difficulty adjusting back into normal life because of the stigma associated with incarceration. People tend to fear what they do not understand, and unfortunately members of society who have been released from prison fall under this category of people who experience hardship and misunderstanding.“Dismas residents help our volunteers become more open minded and better informed about the circumstances that lead up to incarceration and the struggles that lead many people who are released to become re-incarcerated very soon after. Discussions of social justice issues are crucial because of the lack of available resources for these members to help them cope with their circumstances. … The start to resolving social injustice begins with informing the public because ignorance contributes to a culture of misunderstanding, and Dismas does its part to make a difference.”Kaczmarek also quoted a Dismas House graduate, “Greg C.,” in her email:“It has been 12 years since I left Dismas House, and I haven’t been in any trouble. I finished my apprenticeship and received my Associates Degree from Ivy Tech. Until then I always felt that society looked at me like an outcast. Dismas showed me this wasn’t true and that everyone deserves a second chance. The way Dismas and the South Bend community accepted me will always hold strong in my heart, and I will never forget it. I thank the Dismas staff, students and volunteers and the program for changing my life.”Tags: Dismas House, Keenan Hall, service, Student volunteers, Volunteer worklast_img read more

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Complainant in lawsuit alleges University employee previously harassed other student

first_imgA St. Joseph County judge heard arguments Friday regarding the admission of evidence in a lawsuit filed last fall by a Notre Dame student against the University, in which the student alleged sexual harassment and racial discrimination by a University employee, according to an article from the South Bend Tribune. At the hearing, attorneys for the student claimed the University employee named in the suit had previously harassed a different student, but that the University had failed to discipline her on account of her financial ties to the University.The student’s lawyers petitioned the court to order the University to turn over documents concerning payments to Notre Dame by people and businesses connected to the former employee and her family, according to the Tribune’s article.The article stated the judge hearing arguments, St. Joseph Circuit Court special judge Michael Scopelitis, said he needed additional time to decide whether to admit evidence regarding the employee’s financial ties to the University.The lawsuit, filed Oct. 30, 2015, alleges the University employee coerced the student into a sexual relationship with her daughter, according to court documents. Tags: lawsuit, sexual assault, St. Joseph Circuit Courtlast_img read more

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Cirque du Soleil director brings spectacle to ‘The Tempest’

first_imgPhoto courtesy of Matt Cashore Nick Sandys, who plays the magician Prospero in NDSF’s production of “The Tempest,” leads the cast in a scene during a performance. The show runs through Aug. 28 at the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center.“I’m always looking for ways to create productions and to take what I’ve learned from other shows and bring it back to a world where you don’t normally get that type of artistry,” he said. “I thought it’d be interesting for ‘The Tempest,’ because it’s set on a magical island, to let that magic really be evoked using acrobatics and more circus techniques.”The production is put on by NDSF’s Professional Company. Hyler said nine of the 21 actors are professionals; the rest of the cast is rounded out with members of NDSF’s Young Company, who Hyler has worked with for the past two years. One of the actors, Sarah Scanlon, plays Ariel, a spirit of the sky who’s forced to work for the magician Prospero, played by Nick Sandys. “We have [Scanlon] on trapeze for the entire show,” Hyler said. “We represent her enslavement by having her on the trapeze, and it’s only when she’s free from his power she can come down.” In addition to the trapeze artist, “The Tempest” features clowns, acrobatics, live original music played by the cast and the work of “air sculptor” Daniel Wurtzel. “[Wurtzel] came in to create these effects that would let us show the power our magician has over the air,” Hyler said. “What Daniel’s done is he harnesses the power of wind through an arrangement of fans and, through the directionality of them, he can kind of control where the air goes.“He’s able to levitate objects, actually sculpt objects in the air. He came in to create these big spectacles where there’s a big storm that wrecks a boat or Prospero calls down these spirits from the air … and he traps all of his enemies in this enchantment.”Wurtzel’s work in “air sculpture” has been featured in productions and museums, as well as at the closing ceremony of the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics.After a year and a half of pre-production, Hyler said production rehearsals lasted for “only” four weeks.“I didn’t introduce any sort of acrobatic or musical skills to people,” he said. “Sarah Scanlon, who’s in the trapeze, she’s been doing this for a very long time. You’re drawing on skills that people have been perfecting over a lifetime.” Despite all the spectacle apparent in the production, Hyler said the performance is more than just beautiful circus display.“This is ‘The Tempest,’ and it’s not really cut,” he said. “I’ve made some adjustments, but it’s two hours of content. All the language of Shakespeare is in it; it’s Shakespeare. There’s just enough spectacle and wonder inside of the show that their eyes and imaginations become engaged and that’s really rewarding. If you do something right, you can keep the attention of an entire audience.” The show runs until Aug. 28, with shows at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday and at 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. All performances are at the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center. Tickets range from $10 to $40 and are available at the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center ticket office. Guests under 18 can get in free with the purchase of a regular-priced adult ticket. “It does feel as though it’s a modern circus, but it’s deeply rooted in the text,” Hyler said. “It’s a true hybrid; if you’re a Shakespeare purist, I think you’re going to love it. If you’ve never seen Shakespeare and you’re bringing your kids or your grandparents, I think they’re going to be awed by the spectacle of it and the acrobatics of it.” Tags: debartolo performing arts center, notre dame shakespeare festival, the tempest Shipwreck, salvation and the sea are swept into a spectacular in the Notre Dame Shakespeare Festival’s (NDSF) “Cirque du Shakespeare” performance of “The Tempest.” Director West Hyler has directed Cirque du Soleil, as well as Shakespearean dramas, musicals, Broadway productions and circuses around the world.last_img read more

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Students offer insight during second Provost Search Committee listening session

first_imgDuring a Provost Search Committee listening session Wednesday, students said administrators should seek to hire a provost who is committed to Notre Dame’s Catholic identity, promotes inclusive policies, supports a wide range of academic opportunities and communicates well with the student body.The second student listening session drew 12 participants, an increase from the two students who took part in the first session. Participants offered feedback for hiring Notre Dame’s second highest ranking administrator during the hour-long meeting in DeBartolo Hall 101. The committee asked students to consider what challenges and opportunities the new provost would face, what characteristics this person should embody and what University accomplishments should be highlighted to recruit the new administrator.Students voiced several ways the provost could promote a wide range of academic options for students. They stressed the need for interdisciplinary studies, discussed how to make the humanities more accessible to low-income students and emphasized the importance of demonstrating a wide variety of career paths for students of different majors.“I’m excited about the majors and minors that are coming out and that are being created,” junior Connor Whittle said. “But I certainly think that there’re opportunities for growth in the classes that we see offered for students of different disciplines and collaboration between those departments.”Several students also said it was important for the new provost to support the University’s Catholic mission and promote the Church’s values.Sophomore William Gentry said Notre Dame has a “comparative advantage” over leading secular schools because of its uniqueness as “the premier Catholic university.”“I think it’s so important to have a provost who understands that comparative advantage, who understands what this University is about and celebrates that, and themselves are a faithful, practicing, doctrinally sound Catholic,” he said.Craig Iffland, a Ph.D. student in moral theology, said the provost should consider how the tenure process can be difficult for professors — and in particular, women — with growing families. He also said the provost will face the challenge of creating genuine dialogue amongst faculty of varying religious beliefs who feel they can’t freely express their opinions.“I think this is a larger issue within the academy writ large, but I think particularly being a Catholic university, it should be the case that we can have discussions on controversial issues and speak our minds without fear of reprisal,” he said.In looking to hire a new provost, the University should also seek to hire someone who values cultural competence, students said.“Notre Dame does have a reputation … that it’s not particularly welcoming to minority students,” senior Matt Schoenbauer said.Senior Eric Kim added that it is important for the University to foster not just diversity, but also inclusion.“How can we promote both on this campus, in terms of [its] culture [and] academic profile?” he asked.Kim also said the provost should consider ways to highlight the University’s support for low-income students through its programs such as QuestBridge, the Balfour-Hesburgh Scholars and Posse.“I think one of the things when I was a high school senior was that I knew Notre Dame as the school of legacy students,” he said. “I did not know that this was a school that cherished low-income, first [generation] students as well.”It is also important for the provost to connect well with students, participants said at the listening session.“I think the previous provost has done a lot of good work with faculty but hasn’t engaged with students too much,” said Kristopher Murray, a fifth-year graduate student. “I can say that even though a lot of graduate students are engaged in teaching and many are instructors of record, many of them don’t feel much interaction or relationship with the provost.”Sophomore Jack Rotolo also noted a disconnect between the provost’s office and undergraduate students.“I kind of never really thought of the provost office at all, and it just kind of was an organization that existed,” he said.Thus, Rotolo said, it is important for the provost’s office to have open lines of communication with students.“Especially with something as important as the provost, I think transparency is something that’s going to be very important going forward,” he said.Overall, students said, the provost should be a leader with strong core values.“There are going to be pressures from a lot of people — there’s going to be pressures from [University President] Fr. [John Jenkins], from faculty, from students … but the provost definitely needs to be able to think independently,” Murray said.The University’s current provost, Thomas Burish, will step down on July 1, 2020, following the end of his five year term. Community members can offer feedback on the provost hiring process or nominate a candidate for the position by emailing [email protected]: listening session, Office of the Provost, provost, Provost Office, Provost Search Committeelast_img read more

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BAVO hosts midterm candlelight yoga session

first_imgAs midterm week continues, the Saint Mary’s Belles Against Violence Office (BAVO) planned a restorative and healing event for the students. A candlelight yoga session took place in Angela Athletic Center, open to all students who wished to participate and take a break from the stress of the week.Junior Emily Scott — who took a medical leave of absence before returning to the College — has been with BAVO since 2015, serving as an ally and student advisory committee (SAC) member. Scott said the event was intended to be rejuvenating. “During brainstorming we came up with some uplifting events because the topics are pretty heavy. I thought of candlelight, restorative, trauma-informed yoga to kind of go back to BAVO,” Scott said. “During my medical leave I did a lot of restorative trauma-informed yoga and that was probably one of the biggest parts of my healing, so I wanted to kind of bring something like that back to Saint Mary’s with me.”Scott said yoga is a calming practice, one that BAVO wants to fully take advantage of in their list of events planned for the year. “We thought of timing of the year and that probably the most stressful time would be midterms and finals. So each semester we have two yoga sessions,” she said.The next BAVO candlelight yoga session is scheduled to take place in December around finals week.This midterm session was led by Kimmy Troy, a 2000 Saint Mary’s alumna who frequently teaches yoga classes in the Angela Center. She led the hour-long candlelight yoga session, helping students to release the anxiety that builds around midterm week.First-year graduate student Jessica Purvis, who has also been a BAVO ally and SAC member since 2015, said the event could help students heal from the stress and anxiety of the week.“I feel like yoga is a secular thing so you can involve a lot more people and Kimmy did a great job of making it a healing and restorative type of event. You don’t have to have gone through a traumatic event to get something out of it,” she said. “We’re college students, we all have things that we need to heal from regardless of what it is. It’s a safe place, you don’t need to have experience, that was my first time doing yoga.”With candles dotting the room, relaxing music playing over the speakers and hot tea provided after the session, the BAVO event had students leaving feeling relaxed, restored and ready to finish the week.“It was a great break from all the stress of the week,” sophomore Jade Adomako said. “I had a great time just stopping everything for an hour and recollecting myself. You don’t realize how caught up you get in your stress until you take a step back.”Tags: BAVO, saint mary’s, yogalast_img read more

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Why the Iowa caucus matters and how it works

first_imgIowa will host the first major vote of the 2020 presidential election cycle at the Iowa caucus Monday, Feb. 3. The results of the caucus will likely determine the party nominations, and coverage of the event will let voters across America know where candidates stand on crucial issues.The Observer has two reporters at the caucus. Follow us on Twitter and Instagram to see the reporting Editor-in-Chief Kelli Smith and videographer Gretchen Hopkirk are doing from the field.This democratic caucus is unlike other state caucuses and primaries, where ballots are cast in secret. Iowa’s caucus allows for lively discussions and debates.The Des Moines Register reported that only “45% of likely caucusgoers said that they could be persuaded to support someone else. 13% said that they had not yet picked a favorite candidate.” This leaves over half of the caucusgoers open to persuasion by the candidates. The candidates use the caucus as an opportunity to finalize their campaigns and to convince Iowans and the American public to give their support.Historically, the Iowa caucus became famous accidentally, due to a venue error in 1972 and Jimmy Carter’s underdog win in 1976. According to The New York Times, after seeing two long-shot candidates solidifying their win in Iowa, other candidates — like George H. W. Bush — were inspired by McGovern and Carter, making Iowa’s caucus a determining factor in the presidential election cycle for years to come.The caucus starts with the candidates stating their running platforms. After, the candidates stand in designated areas in the room, and the caucusgoers then physically move to one of the areas to confirm their support for that presidential candidate. Caucusgoers can also stand in an uncommitted space if they choose not to vote.Next, caucus organizers tally the votes. All candidates that do not have 15% of the total participants in their group are eliminated from the caucus. Individuals from an unviable group (their candidate had less than 15%) now have the opportunity to join a viable group or the uncommitted group.The caucus organizers count a second time. Now, candidates with a viable number of individuals win delegates.The Iowa Democratic Party determines the “number of state delegate equivalents per candidate at all the caucus locations,” according to The Washington Post.The democratic candidate with the most state delegates and thus DNC delegates wins, improving his or her chance to become the Democratic nominee for the 2020 presidential election.The Iowa Democratic Party made a new rule this election season to increase transparency after the 2016 presidential election. According to The Washington Post, the American public is allowed access to the raw vote totals and the delegate allocations for the first time. By doing this, the Iowa Democratic Party intends to prevent disinformation.Tags: 2020 election, American Politics, Democratic Debates, Iowa Caucus, presidential debates, Presidential electionlast_img read more

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Holy Cross sets move-in date for Aug. 9

first_imgIn a Wednesday email to the student body, dean of students for Holy Cross College Andrew Polaniecki announced move-in for students living on-campus is scheduled for Sunday, Aug. 9 — with the first day of classes set for Aug. 10 — between the hours of 8 a.m. and 6 p.m.According to the email, early move-in has already been approved for a select group of students, including resident assistants, SGA members, soccer players, Welcome Weekend crew leaders and Campus Ministry Spes interns. All other students who wish to request an early move-in date must email Polaniecki directly.Polaniecki also said College President Fr. David Tyson would be in contact with the Holy Cross community soon to share preparations taken for the coming semester, along with students’ role in providing a safe environment in the fall.“It will be more important than ever to realize that our community is bound together in an effort to live as Scholars, Citizens, Leaders and Disciples and we will all have a part to play in the living out of our common mission,” Polaniecki said.Tags: 2020 fall semester, Holy Cross College, Move-inlast_img read more

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