Businessman slapped with additional TIP charge

first_imgThe businessman who earlier this month appeared before Magistrate Leron Daly charged with trafficking nine Brazilian women reappeared at the Georgetown Magistrates’ Courts before the Chief Magistrate on Friday facing additional charges.Mario FigueiraMario Figueira, 34, of Lot 6 Bel Air Promenade, Georgetown, pleaded not guilty to the eight charges which were read to him by Magistrate Ann McLennan.It is alleged that between August 18 and 24, 2016, while acting as an employer to the Brazilians, knowingly took possession of their identification cards.Figueira’s attorney K Juman-Yassin told the court that since his client was first charged, he has not missed any of his court hearings and as such he petitioned for bail.The prosecutor told the court that investigations into the matter have concluded and the nine Brazilians are presently in the custody of the Brazilian Embassy.Bail was granted at the sum of $200,000.The first charge had alleged that Figueira and a Brazilian, Joaquin Fillio, had recruited, transported and harboured the women for the purpose of sexual exploitation.The men pleaded not guilty to all the charges.Fillio was remanded to prison and Figueira was granted bail in the sum of $120,000 for each of the nine charges.last_img read more

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PHILIPPINES Palace vows to go after big fish in drug war says

first_img Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppPhillipines, March 13, 2018 – Malacanang, Manila – Malacañang on Tuesday, March 13, assured the public that the Duterte administration will not allow the big fish to get away from the government’s fight against illegal drugs, stressing that the dismissal of complaints against high-profile drug personalities is not yet final.Presidential Spokesperson Harry Roque Jr. said in a Palace press briefing that the dismissed case against Peter Lim, aka Jaguar, Rolan “Kerwin” Espinosa, Peter Co, et al is far from being closed as it is still up for review by Justice Secretary Vitaliano Aguirre II.“We understand the sentiments and the frustration of the public over the dismissal… We will not allow a big fish to go away if there’s evidence to go after him,” Roque said.“Hindi pa po tapos ang ‘boxing’ laban kay Peter Lim at dito kay Kerwin Espinosa.  Rerepasuhin pa po ‘yan ng Kalihim ng Department of Justice, at sisiguraduhin na tama ang naging naunang desisyon ng ating mga public prosecutors,” he added.Roque noted that the Justice department’s review would determine whether the petition to dismiss the charges should be reversed, or whether additional evidence is necessary to sustain a conviction when the case is filed before the courts.“Ang pangako po ng ating Presidente, kung kulang ang ebidensya, dadagdagan. At kung merong kababalaghan, parurusahan naman ang mga responsable,” he said.“Ang importante lang, masiguro na itong desisyon ng pagdi-dismiss ay nakabase po sa ebidensya at kung hindi, gagawa po ng hakbang ang awtoridad para matuloy ang kaso,” he added.The Palace official likewise pointed out that the dismissal of the case against Lim, Espinosa, Co, et al would not affect the drug charges filed against Senator Leila De Lima, stressing that there are other witnesses who are willing to testify against her.“Hindi naman po kasama dito sa kasong ito si Leila De Lima. So, iba po ang basehan ng pagsampa ng kaso kay Leila De Lima,” Roque said, adding that the Supreme Court has already found probable cause in the complaint against the senator.Furthermore, Secretary Roque assured the public that the President remains committed to end the drug menace in the country and go after all personalities involved in the illegal drug trade.“Huwag po kayong maabala, siguro naman po walang kaduda-duda na seryoso ang ating Presidente dito sa giyera laban sa droga,” he said.Release: Presidential Communications Operations Office                Republic of The Philippineslast_img read more

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Facebook launches Facebook for Every Phone Java app for feature phones

first_imgWith all the noise made by smartphone makers and their apps, you’d almost think that smartphones dominate the world cell phone market, but you’d be wrong, it’s actually something called the feature phone; a not quite dumb cell phone, but not a smartphone either, it’s something in-between. Unlike dumb cell phones, that can’t do much of anything but place telephone calls, or smartphones that are really just little computers running an operating system (iOS, Android, etc.), feature phones are relatively inexpensive devices that rely on apps alone to provide services to their users. And while smartphone sales are expected to surpass those for feature phones in the United States this year, the same cannot be said for worldwide sales, and this is why Facebook has launched an app that it says, will work on almost any feature phone across the globe; well, except maybe many of those in the U.S. This is because it’s a Java based app, and many feature phones in the U.S. are based on something called the BREW platform which does not natively include a Java virtual machine.The new app, called “Facebook for Every Phone” will allow users around the world, (Facebook now claims to have 750 million active users worldwide, 80% of them outside the U.S) to find their Facebook friends, view their inbox and newsfeeds and to view and upload photos.Facebook says the app will be useable by some 2,500 different phone models and at least 20 global carriers in countries such as Germany, the U.K., India, Bangladesh, Malaysia, the Philippines, Indonesia, Pakistan, Turkey, and Brazil.As part of the release, Facebook also said that it will pay for the first 90 days of data transmission incurred by users of the app, which can be purchased in app stores or can be downloaded at m.facebook.com; the app has been optimized to minimize data use, Facebook says, and so users should find it relatively inexpensive to use.Also, noting that there are still an awful lot of feature phone users in the U.S. Facebook has also stated as part of its announcement, that it intends to extend it it’s app to even more handsets in the future, which if it comes to fruition, certainly would make the app’s moniker, ring a little more true. Explore further © 2010 PhysOrg.com Vonage makes free Facebook phone call app Citation: Facebook launches “Facebook for Every Phone” Java app for feature phones (2011, July 15) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-07-facebook-java-app-feature.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Cybercrime May Cost the US Economy 100 Billion a Year

first_img Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. 3 min read July 24, 2013 This story originally appeared on CNBC Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Register Now » Quick — how much money does cybercrime cost the U.S. economy every year? Don’t know? Neither does anyone else. Like other illegal activity, cybercrime is very hard to count because the crime mostly happens in secret. Think of the wide-ranging estimates for the drug trade, for example, or even insider trading.But the folks at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, bankrolled by the computer security firm McAfee, have taken a new approach to tallying up the cybercrime damage, and they’ve generated an interesting number. It’s interesting because the new method results in a total estimate for cybercrime that’s actually lower than some others, which you wouldn’t expect from a study financed by a company that has a vested interest in pointing out just how much cybercrime there is.The new study, released Monday, “posits” — or offers an educated guess — that cybercrime creates a $100 billion annual loss to the U.S. economy, and as many as 508,000 lost jobs as a result.CSIS based this estimate on comparisons with other economic losses, such as car crashes, piracy and “pilferage,” which is the term economists use for retail inventory that “falls off the back of the truck,” if you know what I mean.”Companies accept rates of ‘pilferage’ or ‘inventory shrinkage’ as part of the cost of doing business,” CSIS wrote. “For retail companies in the U.S., this falls between 1.5 percent and 2.0 percent of annual sales — one 2008 estimate put pilferage losses at 1.7 percent.”But the problem with using pilferage as a model, CSIS reports, is that “many companies do not know the extent of their losses, leading them to make decisions about what is an acceptable loss based on inadequate information.”Nonetheless, CSIS assumed that the tolerated costs for cybercrime fall somewhere in line with pilferage, car crashes and the drug trade, yielding a ceiling for their estimated dollar amount of losses.”All good econometrics is at some point based on assumptions,” said Tom Gann, vice president of government relations at McAfee. “Other approaches came up with bigger numbers by doing simple surveys of firms,” Gann said. “What’s important to us is that we’re getting closer to the truth.”Closer, maybe. But McAfee, CSIS and the rest of us still have no way of knowing exactly for sure.last_img read more

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