UK: X-Men Takes in the Depths of Cornwall

first_img View post tag: takes View post tag: depths View post tag: X-Men View post tag: Cornwall Back to overview,Home naval-today UK: X-Men Takes in the Depths of Cornwall <img src=”https://navaltoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/141125-700X-Scan-Eagle-03.jpg” alt=”141125-700X-Scan-Eagle-03″ width=”664″ height=”400″ class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-104773″ />The X-men have taken hold in the depths of Cornwall with the formation of the Royal Navy’s first squadron of unmanned aircraft.700X – X for ‘Xperimental’ – Naval Air Squadron will be at the vanguard of the Fleet Air Arm’s venture into the world of unmanned flight with ‘eyes in the sky’ pilotless aircraft.The squadron has been established at RNAS Culdrose to oversee the deployment of Remotely Piloted Air Systems (RPAS) to pave the way for similar aircraft in the future.For nearly a year, ScanEagle has been launched from the decks of HMS Somerset, Northumberland and Cardigan Bay, and is now being flown from HMS Kent, which has just arrived in the Arabian Sea to begin counter-piracy patrols.Launched by a catapult on a 14ft ramp, ScanEagle can remain airborne for 12 hours operating at ranges of up to 40 miles from the mother ship, beaming live video of what it sees – by day or night, thanks to its electro-optical and infra-red camera – directly into the ship’s operations room.Since being introduced to ships deployed east of Suez at the beginning of the year, ScanEagle has clocked up nearly 1,500 hours on missions.It was brought in to provide eyes for the Royal Navy’s minehunting force in the Gulf, but has proved equally useful in counter-piracy and counter-smuggling operations thanks to its ability to constantly watch over a boarding operation – or monitor a suspicious vessel pretty much undetected.“Commanding officers have nothing but praise for it, but it’s not a replacement for a Merlin or Lynx, rather an addition to the warship’s suite of sensors.”His squadron has two roles: parent unit for the flights deployed on Royal Navy vessels east of Suez; and to trial and evaluate any future unmanned aircraft which the Fleet Air Arm decides to invest in.It’s one of the smallest units in the Royal Navy – the three ScanEagle flights total six RN personnel (one officer as Flight Commander, plus one petty officer as the Senior Maintenance Rating each), and a handful of headquarters staff.The RN team in a flight direct the ScanEagle’s operations, a four-strong team from the aircraft’s manufacturer Boeing Insitu fly and maintain it.“This is a fantastic job. This is the Fleet Air Arm’s first step into the world of remotely piloted air systems and we are looking to develop our tactics and embrace this new technology ensuring the Royal Navy remains a world leader in aviation at sea – whether manned or unmanned.”700 Naval Air Squadron – motto experentia docet (experience teaches) – is one of the varied units in Fleet Air Arm history, having flown most aircraft and helicopters the Royal Navy has operated for the past 75 years.It is formed to test and evaluate new aircraft ready for use by front-line squadrons and most recently as 700M and 700W has helped with the introduction of Merlin and Wildcat helicopters.Press Release; Image: Royal Navy UK: X-Men Takes in the Depths of Cornwallcenter_img View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Maritime Share this article Equipment & technology November 26, 2014last_img read more

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Scout Troop 32 Hosts Pancake Breakfast Fundraiser

first_imgSubmitted by DOUG OTTOOcean City Scouts BSA, Boy Troop 32 will hold a Pancake Breakfast on Sunday, Sept. 29 from 8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Ocean City American Legion Post 524 46th Street and West Ave. in Ocean CityThe menu includes all-you-can-eat pancakes, sausage, coffee, tea, orange juice, and milk. The cost is $9 for adults and $5 for children.Proceeds will be used to fund upcoming camping trips and to procure camping equipment and supplies for Troop 32.For more information, contact Crystal Erney at 609-335-3598 or via email at [email protected] enjoy breakfasts served by Troop 32 members.Troop 32 was chartered in1964 and offers a year-round adventure-based program designed to encourage effective character, citizenship, and fitness training for youth ages 11-18.“The Scouts BSA program is one of the nation’s largest and most prominent values-based youth development organizations,” said Scoutmaster Dean Mitzel. “For more than a century, the Scouts has helped build the future leaders of this country by combining educational activities and lifelong values with fun.”Scout Meetings are held Tuesday evening at 7 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church at 701 Wesley Ave, Ocean City, New Jersey. Troop 32 hosts a pancake breakfast every year at the American Legion Post 524.(Photos courtesy Doug Otto)last_img read more

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Caught on the web

first_img* Psycho Doughnuts’ shop in California features staff wearing nurses’ uniforms, a white padded cell and doughnut names like Bipolar, The Massive Head Trauma and Psycho www.psycho-donuts.com* Fat Princess has been released for the Playstation, where you have to rescue a kidnapped princess who has been fattened up with cake, and carry her home using your whole army tinyurl.com/lceoln* The Mandeville in London has twisted gender stereotypes in London by launching a Men’s Afternoon Tea, designed for manly bonding www.mandeville.co.uklast_img read more

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Center for the Study of World Religions names Francis X. Clooney next director

first_imgFrancis X. Clooney, a Roman Catholic priest and a member of the Society of Jesus, has been appointed the next director of the Center for the Study of World Religions (CSWR) at the Harvard Divinity School (HDS), beginning July 1. He will succeed Donald K. Swearer, who is retiring at the end of June after six years at HDS as the CSWR director and distinguished visiting professor of Buddhist studies.Clooney joined the HDS faculty in 2005, as the Parkman Professor of Divinity and Professor of Comparative Theology, after teaching at Boston College since 1984. He served as acting director of the CSWR during the 2008 spring term and began a long and active relationship with the center before coming to HDS, participating in many CSWR programs and events.To read the full story, visit the Harvard Divinity School Web site.last_img read more

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Saving the best for last

first_imgWith cold gusts, intermittent rain and a No. 14 ranked opponent in the house, you could forgive Notre Dame seniors for not expecting more than participating in the traditional marshmallow toss during halftime of their final home game as students. But then, the unthinkable happened. Notre Dame upset Utah 28-3, giving the Irish its first Senior Day win since 2007, and the senior class, along with much of the student body, stormed the field. Senior Nick Mancinelli said the amount of people combined with the excitement of running onto the field contributed to one particularly thrilling moment Saturday. “I remember trying to get on the field and at one point I was moving without either of my feet touching the ground,” he said. As a member of the Notre Dame class with the most football losses, Mancinelli had low expectations going into Saturday’s game. But he said the win was the perfect way to cap off his last experience as a member of the student section. “I went into the game very cynical,” he said. “I thought we would be slaughtered. This is the first time in my four years where we won as an underdog.” Mancinelli said ending his time as a member of the student section on such a high note makes up for many of the losses during the past four seasons. He also said the positive atmosphere of the game contrasted to previous games this year. “There was something noticeably different about this game,” Mancinelli said. The entire student body was excited. It reminded me of what Notre Dame football is about. You become jaded after loss after loss. It became fun again.” Senior Kaitie McCabe also said the combination of a final win and rushing the field made up for a lot of the difficulties the class experienced as Fighting Irish fans. “I think it was probably the most perfect way we could have ended our four years of Notre Dame football,” she said. “Despite the rain and everything, it was a great time. Rushing the field was one of the coolest things I have done. “Even though we were the losing-est class during our four years, we rallied and won.” McCabe said the mood of the student section felt much more upbeat for their Senior Day than it had for other games this season, contributing to the excitement of the day. “Especially during this season, we were really upset. But for this game everyone was talking about how they bled for this team,” she said. “We were fighting for the win. It was almost as if we hadn’t lost a lot of the games we did this season.” Sophomore Ethan Bailey, a member of the Notre Dame Band, said he could hear the crowd’s enthusiasm over the band’s music. “During the game there didn’t seem to be downtime,” he said. “Everyone seemed to be actively cheering during the game.” Bailey said ending the season on such a high note was not only great for the Notre Dame student body, but especially the seniors. “You didn’t want to end the season on a bad note. The last home game leaves an impression for the rest of the year,” he said. “It was exciting for the seniors too. It was nice to see them get excited for a game and end their four years like that.” Senior Anna Katter said the halftime marshmallow toss, a Senior Day tradition, was a seemingly light-hearted moment that conveyed the bond the campus of Notre Dame possesses. “It was really hilarious to tape [the marshmallows] to your body. It was fun to whip them out at halftime,” she said. “They were disgusting, but it was great to see a sea of white. It was yet another example of unity and family of our senior class.” Katter said rushing the field also reminded her of the close-knit nature of her class. “It was really cool to just run into people. There was just a sense that everyone was thrilled that we won and were seniors,” she said. “It was great to see people you didn’t normally associate with. It was just a sense of fun. We were all there bonded and united on the field.” Bailey said being on the field before the rush was equally as exhilarating because members of the band are used to select number of students being on the turf after games. “It was really awesome to see everyone trying to climb over from the student section,” he said. “It was funny having friends come up to me after the game on the field. That has never happened before.” McCabe said despite the excitement of being on the field, the throngs of students still had respect for the sentimentality of the experience. “Everyone was really excited to rush the field, but when the Alma Mater came on, it was a reflective moment,” she said. “Everyone stopped amidst the chaos.” Now, in addition to being the losing-est class in history, seniors can add another notch to their belt: “Not many seniors can say the best game was the last game of their four years,” Mancinelli said.last_img read more

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Better fuel

first_imgBy Brad HaireUniversity of GeorgiaPlains, Ga. — Georgia legislators and policymakers met with biodiesel industry leaders from around the country here Aug. 26 to discuss ways to encourage the processing and distribution of biodiesel in Georgia. And a former U.S. president is all for it.”This is a day for sharing,” former President Jimmy Carter told about 60 people at the Georgia Biodiesel Summit. The event was sponsored by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences’ Center for Emerging Crops and Technologies.”What we’re looking for today,” Carter said, “is what specifically does Georgia need to do — the legislature and different department heads — to make sure research and development, agriculture and the environment all come together to alleviate any impediments that might not even be detectable now but that have been identified by industry.”Cleaner fuelBiodiesel is the name for a variety of oxygenated fuels made from oilseeds or animal fats. It burns cleaner and is environmentally safer than petroleum diesel. And existing diesel engines and equipment don’t need to be altered to use biodiesel.According to a recent biodiesel study by the UGA Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development, Georgia annually produces about 55 million gallons of oilseeds and animal fats from which biodiesel could be made. The state could supply a moderate-sized biodiesel plant, which would provide an economic impact of $8 million and contribute $800,000 in state taxes each year.Tax incentives and special financing are just a few ways state leaders can help establish a biodiesel industry in Georgia, said John McKissick, CAED coordinator.”But the key to benefitting Georgia (farmers) and communities will be to have any incentives based on a biofuel product produced in Georgia from Georgia products,” McKissick said.CollaborativeFinancial times are tight for Georgia’s General Assembly and state agencies. But Georgia can’t afford to not go forward with biodiesel production, said Terry Coleman (D-Eastman), speaker of the Georgia House of Representatives.”We could put together a collaborative between Georgia’s agricultural and environmental departments and add the university system’s, experiment stations’ and our other research capabilities,” Coleman said. “We may not have a large pot of money. But by putting some effort into a collaborative, there may be an opportunity for us to begin this process.”Adding value to Georgia farm products, such as through biodiesel processing, is one of the best ways to improve Georgia’s farm economy, said Gale Buchanan, CAES dean and director.”What we have to do at the university is provide the education and the information-delivery and hope we can get industry interested,” Buchanan said. “And this meeting today is where you get something off the ground. We hope it’s the start of something important for Georgia.”last_img read more

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Proposed legislation would deal fatal blow to the industry

first_img 9SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr This is one of those blogs where I have to remind you all that the opinions I express, are mine and mine alone.Why do I feel the need to make that qualifier today? Because in my opinion, the credit union industry faces it’s most credible legislative threat to its long-term existence than it has in at least the decade I have been involved in the industry.The proposal to which I am referring (§9 H.R. 3280) would subject the NCUA to the congressional budget process. Why is this such a pernicious threat? Because through the budget process, the Banker’s Association, aided and abetted by their allies in Congress, would gradually strip the NCUA of needed resources and use the appropriations process to stifle needed regulatory reforms. For example, an agency subject to the congressional appropriations process would be much less likely to champion Field of Membership improvements that help credit unions serve more members.Supporters of this bill would tell you that NCUA is being treated no differently than other independent agencies that House Republicans are proposing should be subject to its oversight. This argument has a certain facial appeal. After all, a strong argument can be made that independent agencies like the CFPB are unconstitutional. But in reality, this proposal has nothing to do with constitutional niceties. Unlike the CFPB, a multi-member board already oversees NCUA’s operations. continue reading »last_img read more

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8 FAQs from credit unions on how to respond to COVID-19

first_imgThe Coronavirus pandemic has officially settled in, but credit unions can expect to deal with the fallout for months. This leads to many questions rolling in on how to keep the wheels turning in your institution.But there are more questions than answers. How do you know when it’s time to close one of your branches? How can employees work remotely? How do you set up large meetings remotely? What do you do if an employee tests positive for COVID-19?These questions don’t exactly pop up in the mainstream media, that doesn’t make them any less important. This guide from business continuity planning experts Ongoing Operations will point in you in the right direction for some of the most commonly asked questions from credit unions during this time.For example, if you’re looking to understand what types of remote access your credit union can use, they suggest: ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

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CUNA Coaching Leadership Virtual School to focus on building people leaders

first_img This post is currently collecting data… ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr This is placeholder text continue reading »center_img To acknowledge the need for and power of strong people leaders in credit unions, CUNA has announced CUNA Coaching Leadership Virtual School, set to take place Nov. 9-10. Credit union people leaders of all levels are encouraged to attend this interactive training to transform their leadership by learning, developing and practicing effective coaching conversations.“In a very short period, this program shares enough information, tips and real-life experience to get you on a path that could make a big difference in your life and the lives of your team members,” said Janice McNiel, teleservices manager, Zeal CU.Sessions will be led by Tim Hagen, creator of Progress Coaching. Tim will guide attendees through current training methodologies and models. He will then help them apply these principles to their workplace scenarios to design personalized coaching conversations that elevate staff performance. Attendees will bring coaching scenarios  to work through and will collaborate with peers to design and practice effective coaching conversations.last_img read more

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