An Inside Look At Some Of Our Favorite After Parties For North Coast Music Festival This Weekend

first_imgChicago’s now-annual Labor Day Weekend gathering, North Coast Music Festival, is right around the corner, with Grant Park once again ready to play host for the celebration falling from September 1st through 3rd. North Coast already boasts an enviable and diverse lineup, pulling some beloved names from the electronic, jam, hip-hop, and reggae scenes and beyond for one of their most eclectic and can’t-miss lineups to date. Given its lineup, the festival itself is already set up to be quite an experience in its own right, with its internationally renowned headliners—Deadmau5 & Eric Prydz, STS9, Primus, Ween, Gucci Mane, Bonobo, Damian Marley, Carnage, Tipper, and Big Boi—drawing just as many fans as its stacked down bill, which includes Joe Russo’s Almost Dead, Bob Moses, Ganja White Noise, Autograf, Lettuce, BadBadNotGood, Tank and the Bangas, SunSquabi, Spafford, The Russ Liquid Test, and Manic Focus, just to name a few. (Ticket for North Coast Music Festival are available here.)L4LM’s Top 10 Acts To Catch At North Coast Music FestivalHowever, the festivities in Chicago won’t end once the music stops at Grant Park. There are a number of official after-parties planned to keep the party going each night. We’ve decided to give you the inside scoop on a few of our favorites, and we’ll see you there!Friday — Manic Focus & Russ Liquid at Bottom LoungeOriginally from the Twin Cities but based in Chicago, John “JmaC” McCarten, better known as electronic producer Russ Liquid, is known for his dynamic sound that perfectly synthesizes soul, dubstep, hip-hop, blues, funk, and more. Over the past few years, the producer has been blowing up as a must-see live act, with his shows always offering his patented hard-hitting bass lines juxtaposed with thrilling vocal samples pulled from a wide range of genres. As the years have gone by, Manic Focus has continued to be on the forefront of innovation, frequently enhancing his performances with live instrumentation, including frequent collaborator, drummer Jacob Barinholtz, in addition to special cameos from the likes of Big Gigantic’s Dominic Lalli, GRiZ, and The Floozies’ Matt Hill.For this special Friday performance at Bottom Lounge, Manic Focus will team with Russ Liquid (a.k.a. Russell Scott), the electronic producer and classically trained pianist, saxophonist, flutist, and trumpeter. Russ Liquid in his own right is something special, heading the electrofunk powerhouse The Russ Liquid Test, which sees Scott joined by guitarist Andrew Block and drummer Deven Trusclair. As collaborators on GRiZ’s All Good Records, Russ Liquid and Manic Focus share a common sense of musicality and interest in pushing the boundaries of electronic music as its known today. Listen to Manic Focus’ “Habit” featuring Russ Liquid below to get a taste of what’s to come on Friday night, and swoop your tickets here. You can find the daily schedule and a limited supply of 3-Day, VIP and single day tickets for North Coast Music Festival on the event’s website here. You can also check out the full line-up for official North Coast after-parties below.FRIDAYManic Focus & Russ Liquid – Bottom Lounge – Tickets available HERE (17+)Eric Prydz – the MID – Tickets available HERE (21+)Gucci Mane – Prysm Nightclub – Tickets available HERE (21+)SATURDAYSpafford – Concord Music Hall – Tickets available HERE (18+)EOTO – Bottom Lounge – Tickets available HERE (17+)Don Diablo – the MID – Tickets available HERE (21+)Carnage – Prysm Nightclub – Tickets available HERE (21+)SUNDAYSTS9 – Concord Music Hall – Tickets available HERE (18+)Destructo – the MID – Tickets available HERE (21+)Elephante – Sound-Bar – Tickets available HERE (21+)MONDAYPorn and Chicken – NCMF Official Closing Party ft. Special Guest TBA – the MID – Tickets available HERE (21+) Saturday — Spafford at Concord Music HallSpafford is undoubtedly one of the biggest rising stars on the jam scene right now. Since the group’s inception in Prescott, Arizona, in 2009, the quartet featuring Brian Moss (guitar/vocals), Jordan Fairless (bass/vocals), Andrew “Red” Johnson (keys/vocals), and Cameron Laforest (drums/percussion/vocals) has been on a non-stop upward musical trajectory, with this past year or so seeing the group support Umphrey’s McGee, headline their own national tour, and consistently rise higher and higher on the numerous festival bills they’ve been featured on this summer. Known for their wildly diverse sound, tight transitions, and attention to extended jams, the group has become a sweetheart of the jam scene, and people can’t get enough of them.In fall of last year, Spafford made their debut in the city of Chicago after fans across the country called for the group to leave the Southwest and make their way east. For the Chicago debut in September of 2016, the group quickly sold out The Tonic Room, leaving many eager fans boxed out of their Chicago debut and forcing the group to add a second show last minute to keep up with demand. In April of this year, the group came back to Chicago, similarly selling out the show coming off of a number of sold-out performances in Denver, Phoenix, and beyond. The Windy City clearly can’t get enough of these up-and-comers and tickets will undoubtedly move fast, so make sure to grab your tickets here before it’s too late.center_img Sunday — STS9 at Concord Music HallSTS9 really doesn’t need any introduction. The jamtronica heavyweights are headlining North Coast Music Festival on Saturday night and have been a huge name in the scene for the majority of the two decades they’ve been together since the group’s inception in Georgia in the late 90’s. Their list of festival experiences and sold-out venues is expansive, and pretty much all fans in our scene are familiar with Sound Tribe Sector 9 in some capacity. While the group has a longstanding history and a dedicated fan base already, Tribe is particularly on fire this year as they round into their 20th year. They’ve been sounding tighter than ever, and just last week, the group released a brand-new single, “Real & Imagined,” which was recorded during the Artifact sessions, a period of time between 2001 and 2004 that eventually bore STS9’s critically acclaimed and beloved 2005 album.While the group will be front and center at North Coast on Saturday, fans who want to get a second helping of the innovative five-piece outfit will get the chance on Sunday night, when STS9 hits Concord Music Hall for a more intimate performance than their festival appearance offers. You can snag tickets to STS9’s Sunday hit at Concord Music Hall here.last_img read more

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For President Trump, the road ahead

first_imgAfter a grueling 18-month election that shattered conventional wisdom and longstanding norms of civility and fair play, Republican businessman Donald Trump has defeated Hillary Clinton and will become the 45th president of the United States. After eight years of a Democratic White House, change is coming on strong.Trump’s victory appeared largely driven by voters who wanted to “send a message” by repudiating the political and economic status quo. The raucous campaign was long on tone and messaging, yet often short on policy positions. But with a GOP president and Congress and an opening on the Supreme Court, the shifts ahead could be seismic.Scholars across Harvard spoke with the Gazette about the election’s impact on presidential politics and how Trump’s presidency is likely to change the nation in realms from foreign policy and immigration to the economy and the high court. Early on, here’s a capsule look at how scholars view the road ahead.UNLACING THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACTJohn McDonough, professor of the practice of public health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerJohn McDonoughProfessor of the Practice of Public Health, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public HealthWith the election of Donald Trump as the nation’s next president and the preservation of Republican majorities in the U.S. Senate and House, the future of efforts to reform the U.S. health care system and to achieve universal coverage now enter an arena of high uncertainty. One certainty is this: Beginning in January 2017, even before Trump’s inauguration, congressional Republicans will begin to move legislation to undo foundational elements of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).They will use the special legislative process known as budget reconciliation that enables a bill to avoid filibusters to proceed with limited debate and to pass with only 51 votes. The major challenge with reconciliation is that a bill using this process can only include matters with significant budget impact, up or down. That will not be a problem in dismantling key ACA expansions of Medicaid and private health insurance. It will also not hinder the repeal of major ACA tax increases, especially the new Medicare payroll taxes on high-income households that took effect in 2013.Such a bill is a twofer for Republicans by (1) repealing the reviled Obamacare law, and (2) enacting an enormous tax cut for high-income families. And we know Republicans can get such a bill through the Congress because they did so in January 2016 only to face a veto from President Obama. President Trump will sign the bill.The catch is that some moderate Republican senators, such as Shelley Moore Capito (R-W.V.), voted for the 2016 reconciliation bill because they knew it would not become law. How will Capito, Susan Collins (R-Maine), and other less-hardline Republicans vote on a bill that would eliminate health insurance coverage for up to 20 million low- and moderate-income Americans? That’s the major uncertainty.With what might they replace this lost coverage? House Speaker Paul Ryan unveiled a plan last summer that would encourage states to re-establish high-risk pools for individuals with pre-existing medical conditions, and to provide a flat tax credit for individuals purchasing health insurance. Many experts agree that these measures would leave many millions of currently insured Americans without options. Ryan refused to submit his ideas to the Congressional Budget Office for scoring to enable Americans to understand the impact on individuals and on the federal budget.Though the process will start in early January, it’s uncertain how long it will take. Though Republican leaders will want to rip off this bandage as quickly as possible, this would be a momentous move backward, and the nation will be watching.A RETREAT ON TARGETING CLIMATE CHANGERobert Stavins, Albert Pratt Professor of Business and Government, Harvard Kennedy School. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerRobert StavinsAlbert Pratt Professor of Business and Government, Harvard Kennedy SchoolVoting for Donald Trump and Trump’s own positions and pronouncements was more about attitude than issues, but one of the few areas where issues came up was on climate change. However, there’s huge uncertainty. Tweets about climate change being a Chinese hoax are not a clear indication of policies that we can anticipate.That said, Trump, if we take him at his word, will try to pull the United States out of the Paris Agreement on tackling climate change. But it will take four years to do that, now that it has come into force. (It came into force quickly — with countries accounting for 55 percent of global emissions ratifying it — only because countries were afraid of Trump being elected, and wanted to lock the United States in.)Despite the fact that the Obama administration has already submitted the instrument of ratification through executive agreement, Trump might submit the Paris Agreement to the Senate, where, of course, it would fail in a ratification vote. Or he might just announce that we will not comply with our already submitted nationally determined contributions, a 26 to 28 percent reduction below 2005 emissions by 2025. The big question is what effect all of this will have on the positions of China, India, Brazil, etc. It will surely not encourage greater action.Domestically, he wants to “bring back the coal industry,” but the problems of the U.S. coal industry are competition from low-price natural gas for electricity generation, not environmental regulation. Also, that’s inconsistent with his pronouncements supporting fracking, because that increases gas supply and lowers gas prices, which hurts coal.Could he try to amend the Clean Air Act itself? That would be unlikely to succeed, as Democrats in the Senate would filibuster, I assume. Would he eliminate the Environmental Protection Agency, as he also promised at one point? No, again that would require an act of Congress. But he could try to starve the agency through low funding. And he will be appointing people to hundreds of key positions. That may be my greatest worry, because he may not appoint smart and reasonable people.RETHINKING U.S. LEADERSHIP GLOBALLYR. Nicholas Burns, Roy and Barbara Goodman Family Professor of the Practice of Diplomacy and International Relations, Harvard Kennedy School. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerNicholas BurnsRoy and Barbara Goodman Family Professor of the Practice of Diplomacy and International Relations, Harvard Kennedy SchoolWhen Winston Churchill spoke at Harvard in September 1943 at the height of the Second World War, he reminded faculty and students alike that, for the United States, “the price of greatness is responsibility.”Those are words that President-elect Donald Trump will need to remember and to heed as he assumes the awesome responsibilities of the American presidency. If Trump wishes to keep America the great global leader that it surely is and has been for seven decades, he will need to assume the many obligations we have to lead the free and democratic world at a time of great crisis in Europe, the Middle East, and Asia.I was deeply disappointed by Trump’s victory last evening.  Hillary Clinton was and remains, in my judgment, the far better candidate.  She was vastly better prepared to exercise the responsibilities that come to the occupant of the Oval Office.  I will always be proud to have served as a foreign policy advisor on her campaign team.Based on his behavior in the campaign, Trump has not yet shown the American people or the world that he has the judgment, maturity, balance, and knowledge to be a successful president.  Let us all hope he can demonstrate those qualities and more in the years ahead. As an American, I know that we must accept this result.  Trump won the election fair and square.  Our democratic traditions and basic decency mandate that we must now wish him well.  We must hope (and pray) for the sake of our country and its 320,000,000 inhabitants that he is a successful leader.The rest of the world is also adjusting to his victory. That is because Trump turned 70 years of American foreign policy, in both Democratic and Republican administrations, on its head during the campaign. Trump consistently denigrated our NATO allies while praising Russian leader Vladimir Putin, disparaged our Asian allies Japan and South Korea, pledged to keep Muslims out of America, and repudiated the Mexican people in vulgar terms. These rash and unwise statements have already damaged American credibility in the world.Trump and his senior Cabinet appointees must consider quickly during the transition and after the inauguration on Jan. 20 how to repair these gaping wounds in America’s image and reputation. The United States, for example, has a vital and symbiotic relationship in trade, immigration, energy, and homeland security with our North American allies, Mexico and Canada. Showing respect to the Mexican people and convincing them we will be a good neighbor is another early necessity for the Trump administration.Our NATO allies in Europe and the Asia Pacific region represent the greatest power differential between the United States and our adversaries Russia and China, who have no fixed alliances or reliable friends. As president, Trump will become the leader of the West at a time of rising authoritarianism in the world. He will need to signal quickly and unequivocally that he intends to be a faithful ally and to protect these countries from Russian and Chinese aggression in Eastern Europe and in the South and East China seas, respectively.Finally, Trump’s repudiation of NAFTA and trade in general, his rejection of American traditions of welcoming immigrants and refugees to enrich our country, and his disavowal of elementary standards of human rights are cause for real concern. Does he really intend to dismantle NAFTA, the Iran nuclear deal, and the Paris climate change accord? Leading the federal government and the American people from the Oval Office may be the most difficult job in the country. Trump should proceed toward Inauguration Day with a sense of humility. As our first president with no prior experience in government or the military, his will be a steep and potentially treacherous learning curve. We Americans love our country. We must thus wish that he becomes the president we all need him to be.SPROUTING POPULISM, HERE AND ABROADPippa Norris, Paul. F. McGuire Lecturer in Comparative Politics, Harvard Kennedy School. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerPippa NorrisPaul. F. McGuire Lecturer in Comparative Politics, Harvard Kennedy SchoolWhat explains the populist earthquake in American politics? Some factors are clearly specific to this election campaign: the way that the Republican primaries turned into a circular firing squad for the moderate candidates; the lack of effective new blood competing in the Democratic contests, allowing all the baggage of the Clinton haters to be reignited; events such as the Russian hacking of the Democratic National Committee and the WikiLeaks endless recycling of the Clinton email story, and so on.But the populist earthquake is also part of a far broader picture. Like Donald Trump, leaders such as Marine Le Pen, Norbert Hofer, Nigel Farage, and Geert Wilders are prominent today in many countries, altering established patterns of party competition in contemporary Western societies. These parties have gained votes and seats in many countries, and entered government coalitions in 11 Western democracies, including Austria, Italy, and Switzerland. Across Europe, their average share of the vote in national and European parliamentary elections has more than doubled since the 1960s, from around 5.1 percent to 13.2 percent, at the expense of center parties. During the same era, their share of seats has tripled, from 3.8 percent to 12.8 percent.Even in countries without many elected populist representatives, these parties can still exert tremendous “blackmail” pressure on mainstream parties, public discourse, and the policy agenda, as is illustrated by the U.K. Independence Party’s role in catalyzing the British exit from the European Union, with massive consequences. The electoral fortunes of populist parties are open to multiple explanations, which can be grouped into accounts focused upon (1) the demand side of public opinion, (2) the supply side of party strategies, and (3) constitutional arrangements governing the rules of the electoral game.Applying these explanations to the Trump phenomenon, the demand side concerns the cultural backlash concentrated among older white men who want to “Make America Great Again,” meaning a vision of an older, small-town America, reflecting traditional values common decades ago over more progressive, cosmopolitan, and multicultural values. The supply side concerns how parties compete and the way that the Tea Party wing of the Republican Party advocated and laid the foundation for many of the populist themes that Trump subsequently echoed, including anti-establishment and anti-government efforts, birtherism, climate change denial, and know-nothingness. The institutional context concerns the weakness of party control over the selection process and the path that provides for an outsider candidacy.But the explanation of the populist revolution is less important than the consequences of a President Trump. This is not just the choice of another leader like any other, where there are genuine party differences on public policies and debate about alternative ways to manage the country. The authoritarian tendencies of his leadership, his attack on basic democratic principles, the isolationist withdrawal of America from the world, are likely to be deeply damaging to human rights at home and abroad. Brexit was a disaster for Britain and Europe, but it was just a seismic tremor presaging a far bigger tsunami.SOME RESHAPING OF THE ECONOMYKenneth Rogoff, Thomas D. Cabot Professor of Public Policy, Faculty of Arts & Sciences. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerKenneth RogoffThomas D. Cabot Professor of Public Policy, Faculty of Arts & SciencesIt was an ugly election, and many of us are still scarred and in a state of shock. It is not the economy that worries me, though. In fact, U.S. growth is quite healthy now, and the probability of a near-term recession is not particularly high. Indeed, with Republicans controlling both houses, Trump will probably be able to get through new infrastructure spending (a good idea) and a tax cut (a more debatable idea) that nevertheless will boost short-run growth.In the long run, one can only hope that the Republican Congress blocks Trump from following through with his campaign pledges on international trade agreements, which will hurt growth and lead to a big rise in the cost of living for poor and lower-middle income families.A BLOW TO BOTH PARTIES’ ELITESMichael Sandel, Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Government, Faculty of Arts & Sciences. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerMichael SandelAnne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Government, Faculty of Arts & SciencesTrump’s victory is shocking, but not surprising. It reflects the failure of elites in both parties to grasp the discontent roiling the country. It is an angry verdict on two decades of rising inequality, bank bailouts, and a version of globalization that benefits those at the top but leaves ordinary people feeling disempowered.It is a humbling moment for elites in both parties, for big-data prognosticators, and for a technocratic approach to politics that is tone-deaf to the resentments of people who feel the economy and the culture have left them behind.A SURGE IN ETHNO-NATIONALISMBart Bonikowski, associate professor of sociology, Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies. Courtesy of Minda de Gunzburg Center for European StudiesBart BonikowskiAssociate professor of sociology, Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies Donald Trump’s defeat of Hillary Clinton, fueled by a large turnout among white rural and exurban voters, marks a victory for the darkest forces in American politics. The United States as a society and a polity had the opportunity to stand against the politics of fear and resentment. It failed to do so.It is difficult to know what a Trump presidency will bring. At the very least, we are likely to see the Supreme Court shift radically to the right — representing a major threat to the future of civil rights in the United States — and many of President Obama’s hallmark initiatives, including the Affordable Care Act and the Paris Agreement, will be rolled back. But those expectations would be similar for any generic Republican president working with a unified Republican Congress.Yet, Donald Trump is anything but generic. During his campaign, he repeatedly undermined fundamental democratic principles, rejected facts and expertise, and vilified racial, ethnic, and religious minorities. These positions are likely to have real consequences for public policy and democratic governance, potentially compromising the integrity of federal agencies and jeopardizing the freedom of the press. Just as importantly, Trump legitimized deep ethno-national resentments among his supporters, which are unlikely to subside after his loss. Driven by a fear of demographic and cultural change, white voters — especially those living outside of major urban centers — have embraced racism and xenophobia and rejected the politics of civility.Given that GOP elites have largely supported Trumpism — whether tacitly or actively — in the lead-up to Nov. 8, it would be naïve to expect resistance from a Republican Congress should Trump choose to deliver on his exclusionary campaign promises. Moreover, in 2018 and 2020, the Republican Party will almost certainly double down on the ideology that brought it the presidency in 2016. What was at stake in this election was the meaning of the nation itself. Ethno-nationalism has emerged victorious. The next four years are likely to be a trying time for the United States, and for the world.A NEED TO PROTECT RIGHTS AND FREE EXPRESSIONJill Abramson. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerJill AbramsonSenior lecturer on journalism, Faculty of Arts & SciencesA chill went through the Javits Center at around 11 p.m. Tuesday. The site had been picked because of its giant glass ceiling, but that metaphor was becoming more stale by the minute. Although there was a smattering of applause every time a state was called for Hillary Clinton, her supporters began streaming out, some tearful. I’ve covered election nights since 1976, the year I graduated from Harvard. None was as sad or jarring as this one. Donald Trump’s victory is a very real American tragedy, as New Yorker editor David Remnick wrote this morning. The forces of anger and bigotry have triumphed. Our liberal democracy is endangered.With a unified Republican government in Washington, D.C., and an open seat on the U.S. Supreme Court, the usual checks on a new president’s power are absent. What can be done? In the face of a leader whose rhetoric is authoritarian, it is more important than ever to stand up and protect our constitutional rights. Being tuned into news about politics and policy is more vital than ever.In journalism, which is my area of teaching, making sure you are informed by fact, not some distorted alt-right version of truth, is crucial. Write clearly and passionately. Continue to exercise our precious freedom of expression.LOVE, TO HEAL A DIVIDED NATIONStephanie Paulsell, Susan Shallcross Swartz Professor of the Practice of Christian Studies. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerStephanie PaulsellSusan Shallcross Swartz Professor of the Practice of Christian Studies, Harvard Divinity SchoolFor more than a year, the president-elect’s disparagement of refugees and immigrants, his reduction of women to sexual objects, the hatred he has directed toward Muslims and Mexicans, his ridicule of disabled people, the resentment he has channeled toward African-Americans, and his caricaturing of black life in this country have flooded into our public and private spaces at full force, undisguised. The outcome of the election has not only exposed the divisions in our nation, but deepened them. There is no doubt that this election made visible genuine economic despair felt by many in this country. But that despair has expressed itself through support for a candidate who brought white nationalism into the mainstream. How do we reach out to one another to try to respond to that despair while at the same time refusing the white supremacist ideology to which it has yoked itself? How do we, as a society, support and protect those made the most vulnerable by that ideology?Martin Luther King Jr. wrote in 1967 that racism could be “that corrosive evil that will bring down the curtain on Western civilization.” Certainly it is eroding our democracy. In the face of racism, poverty, and war, King called for “an all-embracing and unconditional love for all.”Love, he argued, was a “force which all of the great religions have seen as the supreme unifying principle of life.” Can we attach ourselves to that force as we try to move forward as a nation? Only if we understand it in the utterly unsentimental way that King did, as a force with the power to transform. Or, as Dostoyevsky put it, “Love in action is a harsh and dreadful thing compared to love in dreams.”These interviews have been edited for length and clarity.Savelast_img read more

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Complainant in lawsuit alleges University employee previously harassed other student

first_imgA St. Joseph County judge heard arguments Friday regarding the admission of evidence in a lawsuit filed last fall by a Notre Dame student against the University, in which the student alleged sexual harassment and racial discrimination by a University employee, according to an article from the South Bend Tribune. At the hearing, attorneys for the student claimed the University employee named in the suit had previously harassed a different student, but that the University had failed to discipline her on account of her financial ties to the University.The student’s lawyers petitioned the court to order the University to turn over documents concerning payments to Notre Dame by people and businesses connected to the former employee and her family, according to the Tribune’s article.The article stated the judge hearing arguments, St. Joseph Circuit Court special judge Michael Scopelitis, said he needed additional time to decide whether to admit evidence regarding the employee’s financial ties to the University.The lawsuit, filed Oct. 30, 2015, alleges the University employee coerced the student into a sexual relationship with her daughter, according to court documents. Tags: lawsuit, sexual assault, St. Joseph Circuit Courtlast_img read more

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Glenn Close & Andrew Lloyd Webber Strike a Pose at Sunset’s London Opening

first_img Star Files It’s as if they never said goodbye! The Tony-touting Sunset Boulevard returned to London on April 4, and its musical mastermind Andrew Lloyd Webber got together with leading lady Glenn Close, who is currently reprising her Tony-winning role as the “greatest star of all,” Norma Desmond. The tuner nabbed seven Tony Awards in 1995, including Best Musical and Best Score. Directed by Lonny Price, this semi-staged production boasts the full English National Opera orchestra and also stars Michael Xavier as Joe Gillis. As previously reported, the limited engagement will run at ENO’s London Coliseum through May 7. Take more than one look at the adorable photo above! Glenn Close & Andrew Lloyd Webber(Photo: Dan Wooller) View Comments Glenn Closelast_img read more

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October Climate

first_imgOctober saw the easing of drought conditions across the state, but many producers reported that the months of dry conditions had already harmed their crops.Drought covered 61% of the state at the beginning of the month, including several areas of extreme drought. It expanded through midmonth due to lack of rain and record-setting high temperatures, but drought conditions began to decrease by the third week following rain from a slow-moving warm front through south-central Georgia, Tropical Storm Nestor.Cattle producers reported that they would lose their last cutting of hay due to dormant pastures and would have to use their winter hay stock earlier than usual to feed livestock. Rain from Nestor caused some problems for peanut vine integrity but loosened the soil for harvest. Cotton, soybean and peanut harvest were all ahead of the five-year averages.With the exception of drought conditions, the most notable climatic trend during October 2019 was the summer-like weather.Records were set for warm weather at National Weather Service monitoring stations across the region on Oct. 1 through 4, and several of the stations reported their all-time highest October temperature during that time period, including Atlanta with 96 degrees Fahrenheit on Oct. 2, Athens with 100 F on Oct. 3, Alma with 97 F on Oct. 4 and Augusta with 101 F on Oct. 4. Savannah also tied their all-time October record with 97 F on Oct. 4 and reported their latest ever 90 F day on Oct. 31, with the previous latest occurrence occurring on Oct. 27, 2014.Macon reported a high of 103 F on Oct. 4, breaking the old record of 95 F set in 1954. Brunswick also reported a new daily record of 89 F on Oct. 31, surpassing the old record of 85 F set in 2016, and reported a record high minimum temperature of 80 F on Oct. 2, breaking the old record of 78 F set in 2002.When the final statistics are calculated, October 2019 is expected to be among the top five warmest Octobers on record.In Albany, the monthly average temperature was 74.3 F, 6.2 degrees above normal.In Alma, the monthly average temperature was 72.2 F, 3.8 degrees above normal.In Athens, the monthly average temperature was 67.4 F, 4.4 degrees above normal.In Atlanta, the monthly average temperature was 68.4 F, 5.1 degrees above normal.In Augusta, the monthly average temperature was 70.6 F, 6.2 degrees above normal.In Brunswick, the monthly average temperature was 76.2 F, 6.0 degrees above normal.In Columbus, the monthly average temperature was 71.9 F, 5.4 degrees above normal.In Macon, the monthly average temperature was 71.1 F, 6.2 degrees above normal.In Rome, the monthly average temperature was 66.4 F, 5.3 degrees above normal.In Savannah, the monthly average temperature was 73.8 F, 5.9 degrees above normal.In Valdosta, the monthly average temperature was 74.0 F, 5.3 degrees above normal.Despite the warm weather, the state was wetter than normal, with a few areas receiving more than 6 inches above normal. This welcome rain led to a reduction in drought conditions across the state by the end of the month.The highest monthly total precipitation measured by a National Weather Service reporting station was 7.84 inches in Rome, 3.98 inches above normal, and the lowest recorded rainfall was recorded in Alma with 3.48 inches, 0.45 inches above normal.Albany 4.64 inches, 2.01 inches above normal.Athens received 3.81 inches, 0.26 inches above normal.Atlanta received 3.59 inches, 0.18 inches above normal.Augusta 4.12 received inches, 0.85 inches above normal.Brunswick 5.36 received inches, 0.90 inches above normal.Columbus received 4.34 inches, 1.76 inches above normal.Macon 5.56 received inches, 2.80 inches above normal.Savannah 7.28 received inches, 3.59 inches above normal.Valdosta 3.58 received inches, 0.38 inches above normal.Two daily rainfall records were set in October. On Oct. 19, Macon received 2.20 inches, breaking the old record of 1.74 inches set in 1950. On Oct. 31, Athens received 1.33 inches, surpassing the old record of 0.95 inches from 1926. Fortunately, most of the rain ended before dusk, so it did not ruin Halloween for the local children.The highest daily rainfall total from Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network observers was 5.71 inches 6 miles northwest of Dahlonega in Lumpkin County on Oct. 31, followed by 5.56 inches measured north of Jesup in Wayne County on Oct. 16. For the month, an observer near Midway in Liberty County reported a total of 12.26 inches, followed by 12 inches.For more information, please visit site.extension.uga.edu/climate and georgiaweather.net. Please feel free to email your weather and climate impacts on agriculture to share on the blog to [email protected]last_img read more

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8th death reported in Broome County from the coronavirus

first_imgThe victim was a woman in their 80. 236 people are in mandatory quarantine and 12 people are precautionary quarantine. Broome County April 13 coronavirus update Reopening the county Garnar also announced the county has 139 confirmed of COVID-19, 104 of those cases are active. The county executive said much of what the county will do to reopen it will depend on the state government. Garnar says more people in Broome County are being tested for the virus which is the reason of the increase in positive cases. Coronavirus numbers A map detailing where the cases are located can be found by clicking here. On Friday, Garnar said the pandemic has “greatly damaged” the economy. (WBNG) — Broome County Executive Jason Garnar announced the death of the 8th county resident from the coronavirus. Garnar says county officials are developing a recovery task force in preparation to help aid the economy. Garnar says the reopening of the economy will be a slow process. 27 people have recovered. He said the county will also focus on getting the workforce back to work, mental health issues from the pandemic and “a number of other issues.”last_img read more

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HHS adds Relenza to state stockpile program

first_imgJul 21, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – The US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) yesterday announced a contract with GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) that will allow states to add the influenza drug zanamivir (Relenza) to their federally subsidized antiviral stockpiles.The contract, worth $16,833,000, paves the way for 50 states and 9 other jurisdictions to purchase up to 15.5 million Relenza treatment courses from GSK at a federally negotiated price, with a 25% federal subsidy. HHS has already offered the same subsidy for states to purchase up to 31 million courses of the antiviral oseltamivir (Tamiflu) as part of preparations for a potential influenza pandemic.HHS’s goal is to enlist the states’ efforts in building antiviral medication stockpiles so that treatment courses will be available for 25% of the US population. The federal government will purchase 44 million treatment courses for the national stockpile and hopes the states will assist by adding 31 million treatment courses to their individual stockpiles.”Today’s announcement is another example of how we all must share in the responsibility to prepare our nation and its communities to respond to a pandemic flu outbreak,” said HHS Secretary Mike Leavitt in a press release.On Jun 30 HHS announced a contract with Roche to sell up to 31 million treatment courses of Tamiflu to the states at a federally negotiated price. But today’s announcement appeared to signal that up to half of the 31 million courses that HHS wants in state stockpiles could be Relenza. HHS officials could not be reached for clarification in time for this story.Relenza is approved for the treatment of uncomplicated influenza in patients aged 7 years and older, according to the US Food and Drug Administration. The drug is in a powder form that is inhaled from a breath-activated plastic device twice a day for 5 days. Tamiflu is an oral medication that can be administered to patients ages 1 year and older. Both drugs are neuraminidase inhibitors (NIs).Many experts consider stockpiling NIs an important strategy for limiting the impact of an influenza pandemic. The H5N1 avian influenza virus has been shown to be susceptible in vitro to both drugs, but most governments that are stockpiling antivirals to prepare for a pandemic have ordered Tamiflu.States have until Aug 1 to indicate if they want to participate in the antiviral medication subsidy program. So far, few states have notified the HHS that they intend to purchase the subsidized medications.See also:Jul 20 HHS press release on zanamivir (Relenza) drug purchaseJul 18 CIDRAP News story “States slow to sign up for Tamiflu subsidy”last_img read more

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Unai Emery reveals Arsenal’s plan to stop Wilfried Zaha and sends message to Nicolas Pepe

first_imgUnai Emery reveals Arsenal’s plan to stop Wilfried Zaha and sends message to Nicolas Pepe Advertisement Arsenal manager Unai Emery is aware of Wilfried Zaha’s threat (Picture: Getty)Unai Emery says Arsenal have done their homework on Wilfried Zaha as they look to bounce back from Monday’s defeat at Sheffield United with a victory over Crystal Palace.Palace are just one point behind Arsenal in the Premier League table and will leapfrog the Gunners into fifth place with a win at the Emirates.Considering their wretched form on the road this season, Arsenal will be relieved to be back in front of a home crowd but Emery knows fans will only be satisfied with all three points.Nicolas Pepe scored a terrific brace to see off Vitoria in the Europa League on Thursday night and Arsenal will hope to build some momentum on Sunday afternoon.ADVERTISEMENT Comment Emery’s side are just one place above Palace in the table (Picture: Getty)Zaha is set to face Arsenal for the first time since being linked with the north London club in the summer and the forward will be desperate to make an impact after an underwhelming start to the campaign.AdvertisementAdvertisementThough Zaha has provided just one assist in the league so far this term and is yet to score a single goal, Emery insists Arsenal will ‘respect’ the Ivorian and his Palace team-mates.‘He’s played very well against us,’ Emery told Sky Sports.‘We know we need to stop him but we need to stop them.‘We are going to prepare the match, trying to push our capacity, our skills, but with respect to them.’center_img Arsenal v Crystal Palace: Unai Emery press conferenceTo view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video Play VideoLoaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 6:44FullscreenArsenal v Crystal Palace: Unai Emery press conferencehttps://metro.co.uk/video/arsenal-v-crystal-palace-unai-emery-press-conference-2035670/This is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Emery has urged supporters to be patient with Pepe but has no doubts that his £72million signing will succeed in Arsenal colours.‘It’s a long process,’ he said.‘He needs to take that confidence into training first, then secondly with his teammates.‘And also here in London be comfortable with his family, living here every day.‘And then on the pitch I think he’s progressively feeling better.’More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityAsked whether Pepe can go on and become an Arsenal legend, Emery replied: ‘We cannot now speak about the long future.‘We need to speak about the short future and the present.‘I think he has the quality, he also has good speed, good spirit and he’s a very humble man.‘I think this is the first characteristic to improve with us.’MORE: Frank Lampard reveals Chelsea players were ‘upset’ after Burnley win Metro Sport ReporterSunday 27 Oct 2019 3:16 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link579Shares Advertisementlast_img read more

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BP’s chief executive Bob Dudley to step down

first_imgBernard Looney (Image courtesy of BP)UK-based energy giant and LNG player BP’s chief executive Bob Dudley is set to step down from his position as well as the company board following delivery of the company’s 2019 full-year results in February 2020 and will retire on March 31, 2020. The company added that Bernard Looney, currently chief executive, Upstream, will succeed Dudley as group chief executive and join the BP board on February 5, 2020.Looney will continue in his current role until this date, the company’s statement reads.Commenting on the announcement, BP chairman Helge Lund said: “Bob has dedicated his whole career to the service of this industry. He was appointed chief executive at probably the most challenging time in BP’s history. During his tenure he has led the recovery from the Deepwater Horizon accident, rebuilt BP as a stronger, safer company and helped it re-earn its position as one of the leaders of the energy sector. This company – and indeed the whole industry – owes him a debt of gratitude.”BP further added that Lamar McKay, currently deputy group chief executive, has agreed to serve as chief transition officer. In this new role, McKay will support the chairman and incoming group chief executive to ensure a full and orderly transfer of leadership. He will assume this new role immediately and step down as deputy group chief executive.last_img read more

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