Passing The Russ Liquid Electric Kool Aid Acid Test With Flying Colors [Review]

first_imgThe Russ Liquid Test  has been in the works for quite some time, and with the release of their debut album 1984 (listen here), we have been able to peer into the elusive looking glass of this project. A few lucky fans were able to experience the spectacle that is the Russ Liquid Test, and boy do we want more.In the days leading up to the highly anticipated Pretty Lights Live New Year’s Eve event, Russ Liquid graced New Orleans venue Howlin’ Wolf with an unprecedented and undeniably funk-filled performance. Dubbed “The Russ Liquid Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test,” Russ was joined by members of Gramatik, Pretty Lights Music, Manic Focus, The Speakerbox Experiment, and Dumpstaphunk in a rare and one of a kind set. Along with Russ, the center of the Test is Lowtemp Music relative and right hand man, Andrew Block. The duo jammed through their nearly three-hour long set alongside legendary artists, Alvin Ford Jr., Borahm Lee, Keniem “Ken” Turner, Dwayne “JuBee” Webb, Emily Nichols, Deven Trusclair, and Angelica “Jelly” Joseph. With such an extensive lineup of industry heavy weights and their diverse musical backgrounds, Russ Liquid led the Merry Pranksters in their ever so groovy Kool-Aid acid test.Although in reference to Tom Wolfe’s The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, the appreciation for New Orleans culture and its deep, soulful roots did not go unnoticed. Nick Marcadel, Jason Hodge, Keniem “Ken” Turner, and Angelica “Jelly” Joseph of the Nola based band, The Speakerbox Experiment, showcased their talent in integrating ephemeral vocals and heavy funk. Dumpstaphunk and Pretty Lights Live staple Alvin Ford Jr., along with Borham Lee complimented consistent groove and delightfully teased the audience in the shadow of the upcoming weekend.The evenings set began with Marcadel on the drums, Hodges and Lee on keys, Block and Turner on strings, and Russ with his powerful brass and turn-table mastery. The intimate venue was flooded with funk and driven by Russ Liquid’s trademark trumpet notes. While a traditional Russ Liquid set would be driven by electronic synthesis, The Russ Liquid Test has integrated musical components from every genre to create the Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. Electronic notes surfaced, however waltzed gracefully with each jazzy groove, illuminating the Howlin’ Wolf in psychedelic entrancement. Each member of the crowd flowed with ease as blaring trumpet notes fluttered throughout the room. As if the crowd was not hyped up enough, Russ took to the mic and urged, “who’s ready for some drum and bass?!” With raised arms and begging voices, Alvin Ford Jr. then took to the stage. With a confident swig of champagne, the mogul took to the drums as if the room would shatter with sound.Russ then introduced vocalists including Joseph and Nichols, bringing some serious traditional groove to the stage. As Joseph swayed and belted deep soul-rich chords, Nichols took center stage commencing “Let Me Stand,” a track from the recent Russ Liquid Test album. This is a track laced with the Russ Liquid traditional, trippy synth yet caressed with velvet vocals. Rappers including Manic Focus’s JuBee then took to the stage laying down hot and heavy hip hop and spitting bars of pure mastery. Tracks such as “King Kunta (Kendrick Lamar)” were thrown into the mix as well as “FNK FWD (Feat. Steve Swatkins)”. The evenings end drew close as The Acid Test dove into “1984 (Feat. Ivan Neville)” synchronizing the crowd in dance and vocals. With heavy and finessed vocals from the stage, and a final epic freestyle, each member of the crowd left the Howlin’ Wolf absolutely memorized.With the finale leaving both crowd goers and artists alike entranced, The Kool-Aid Acid Test was a blaring success. Although a sense of euphoric sobriety was carefully threaded through the atmosphere, it was as if the crowd did in fact drink the Kool-Aid.Don’t miss this band when they make their debut performance in New York on Saturday, February 18th. More information can be found here.last_img read more

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Center for Social Concerns immersions cancelled as a result of pandemic

first_imgThe Center for Social Concerns routinely offers opportunities to engage in current issues that deal with injustice, poverty and oppression. As a result of the coronavirus pandemic, some seminars have undergone changes this semester.Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross students are able to participate in social concerns seminars, which allow students to take a pragmatic approach towards learning about social issues that impact their communities and beyond.Under the direction of Adam Gustine, interim program director of the social concerns seminars, students in these programs analyze different texts, study the role of Catholic social tradition and participate in hands-on immersion experiences in order to develop both empathy and understanding towards social concerns topics.Associate professor Kraig Beyerlein, was unable to teach his normally popular course, the Border Issues Seminar, this year.“It’s heartbreaking,” he said. “This course is always the highlight of my academic year and the immersion trip has transformed in many, many ways, and it’s heartbreaking that we couldn’t do it.”In typical years, the fall semester would be spent in the classroom completing academic readings and an immersion trip to the Mexico-U.S. border would take place the first week before spring semester begins. This year, the seminar will not take place at all.When asked if there was ever the consideration that the seminar would be moved virtually, Beyerlein said, “Immersion is in the title of the course description.”He later added, “It was an issue of integrity. I couldn’t teach a course that didn’t do justice to the description.”Gustine echoed Beyerlein’s views about cancelling some of the seminars due to COVID-19 restraints.“The DNA of a seminar is rooted in an immersive learning experience, encountering people, encountering situations,” he said.However, he also had a positive outlook upon the changes made within the seminars.“There are new opportunities that we have because we are not traveling this semester. And that is to ask questions related to larger cultural issues, larger societal elements that we’re in, and to ask good questions about what it means to be a people committed to faith and justice and action on campus and within the Notre Dame community,” Gustine said.He is also excited about offering two additional sections on racial justice called “Act Justly,” which evaluates prejudices through the lens of the campus community.Gustine revealed the seminar that changed the most this year was the Spirit of Appalachia. Typically, this course involves a trip to Appalachia as the culminating experience. Instead, they have adapted it into a seminar called “People, Land and Community” which Gustine described as “thinking about questions of creation, care, community and human dignity through the lens of Appalachian pastoral letters and some other theological reflections as well.”While seminar professors and directors are taking important steps to provide students with opportunities to get involved despite travel restrictions this year, it doesn’t go without remorse.“It’s truly disappointing on so many levels. I know students are disappointed, I’m disappointed,” Beyerlein said. “At the end of the day, it is about keeping people safe, and I don’t see a universe in which we could have done it, as unfortunate as that is.”Tags: Act Justly, Center for Social Concerns, Community, Racismlast_img read more

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TVA’s Johnson: Utility’s coal plant closures make economic sense

first_imgTVA’s Johnson: Utility’s coal plant closures make economic sense FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Reuters:The chief executive of Tennessee Valley Authority said on Thursday the U.S.-owned power generator will keep cutting carbon emissions in future years after replacing much of its coal-fired fleet with plants run on natural gas, nuclear and renewables.Since Bill Johnson took the reigns as CEO in 2013, TVA has spent $15 billion to modernize its generating fleet, reduced carbon emissions by retiring coal units, and cut debt by $3.5 billion, all while keeping consumer electric prices basically flat for six years.“Carbon emissions are now down to 50 percent below 2005 levels. I predict CO2 will fall to 60 percent below 2005 levels by 2020/2021 and 70 percent by the end of the next decade,” Johnson told Reuters in an interview.The company continued to shut coal-fired units over the past two years despite efforts by U.S. President Donald Trump to prop up the coal industry by sweeping away former President Barack Obama’s climate change regulations, like the Clean Power Plan.Johnson said TVA shut old coal plants for economic reasons. “We have reduced carbon emissions simply by doing what is the most efficient and effective way to serve our customers,” Johnson said, noting the low cost of gas in recent years has made it more economic for TVA to build a new gas-fired power plant than refurbish a 60-year old coal unit.Over Johnson’s tenure, TVA’s generating mix transitioned from 41 percent coal and 12 percent gas in 2012, the year before he became CEO, to 19 percent coal and 20 percent gas in 2018, according to TVA’s federal filings. And TVA may not be done retiring coal plants.More: TVA to keep cutting carbon with natural gas, nuclear power plants: CEOlast_img read more

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Armed Forces Championship Builds Camaraderie Among Services

first_img After a long, hard-fought battle of the skills, the Armed Forces Championship basketball tournament came to an end at the Paige Fieldhouse, this past April at the Marine Corps base in Camp Pendleton, Calif. The best selected players from all five services came from around the globe to compete in the men’s and women’s basketball tournament with the Air Force taking home the gold in both categories this past April. The men’s final score was 71-65 against the Army with the women’s Air Force team taking home a victory of 67-51 against the Army. “It’s been a great tournament; every team is very well-matched and well-coached,” said Thomas Fisher, athletic director of the Semper Fit Division, Marine Corps Community Services. “Throughout the whole world, all the services have intramural teams or varsity teams, and from there they select their best players to go to a camp. From there they select who will move up to higher levels like this and compete against the other services.” Throughout the duration of the tournament, warrior ethos on the court was comparable to any combat training environment. The competitive spirit was alive and well at Paige Fieldhouse. “In team sports you’re fostering leadership, you ‘re fostering teamwork…you’re under adverse conditions,” said Fisher. “It’s not the same as combat, but as far as adversity, you can use what you do in athletics [in combat]. It’s a safe way of fostering leadership. “ All five services had something different to bring to the table, just as all five services have different, yet equally important missions. “We’re all in the same fight; we’re all protecting freedoms for our country,” said Fisher. “It is good to come together and promote the fact that every service has a different mission and to compete against your fellow brothers and sisters is rewarding. This is a once in a lifetime experience.“ Despite their athletic ability and skills on the court, playing basketball isn’t an everyday job for these players. These service members come together once a year to compete for bragging rights. “These are the best available performers,” said Fisher. “Some are deployed and aren’t able to compete. I’m just highly impressed with the players.” It is important for players who are selected to perform at the best of their ability and enjoy their time being able to play, said Onyenma Nwaelele, guard from Seattle who is stationed at Kingston Air Force Base, Miss. “To be a part of this is something special,” said Nwaelele. “I like interacting with people from all over the world one week a year. I’m just proud to be a part of something big…something special.” The best players from all the men’s services will continue on to play at the World Championships in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, July 12 – 25 and the women will finalize the competition in Coco Beach, Fla. By Dialogo May 09, 2011last_img read more

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Red Mass set for Tallahassee

first_imgRed Mass set for Tallahassee Red Mass set for Tallahassee February 1, 2005 Regular Newscenter_img A 700-year-old tradition will be observed in Tallahassee March 9 when the Catholic Bishops of Florida will gather with area judges, lawyers, as well as others serving in the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government to celebrate “The Red Mass of the Holy Spirit.”The Red Mass — a longtime annual event in Tallahassee — originated in the early 13th century as a service conducted exclusively for the bench and bar, in which God was called upon to help lawyers and judges adhere to truth and justice. All lawyers and judges are invited to attend this year’s service and the ensuing reception.In Florida, the Red Mass coincides with the opening of the legislature, and those in attendance pray for divine inspiration and guidance.The Red Mass will be celebrated at the Co-Cathedral of St. Thomas More in Tallahassee, beginning at 6 p.m. The Homily address will be given by Bishop Gerald M. Barbarito, presently serving, by appointment of Pope John Paul II, as bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Palm Beach.The Co-Cathedral is located across from Florida State University, at the intersection of West Tennessee Street and Woodward Avenue. Attendees are urged to allow time for parking. A reception will follow.The Red Mass tradition was first documented in France, in the 1200’s, where a special Mass for lawyers and judges was held in the Chapel of the Order of Advocates, built by King Louis IX. The tradition soon spread to England, where, during the reign of King Edward I, the entire bench and bar would mark the opening of each Term of Court by attending a Mass together.last_img read more

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Noam Chomsky Day Celebrates The Great American Intellectual & Activist

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A big day is coming up—and it’s giving people cause for celebration.On Dec. 7, Noam Chomsky turns 88, but the birthday of America’s great public intellectual actually got his mainstream acclaim last year in Matt Ross’ poignant indie film Captain Fantastic, a quirky comedic drama about a left-wing family living off the grid in the woods of the Pacific Northwest who traditionally celebrate “Noam Chomsky Day” instead of Christmas.What is Noam Chomsky Day?On this unique holiday, the presents aren’t the latest video games and expensive perfumes, but hunting knives and crossbows. There’s also cake, candles and quotations from “Uncle Noam,” the famed M.I.T. professor of linguistics and libertarian socialist culture critic.As played by Viggo Mortensen, Ben Cash, the patriarch of this little tribe, is opposed to organized religion, soulless American consumerism and corporate commercialism that has demeaned contemporary life. He’s raising his six kids, who range in age from about 6 to 18, while their mom, his wife, is hospitalized with a debilitating disorder. In her absence, he maintains a rigorous program of physical and intellectual training, raising his brood to be philosopher kings. They know how to hunt, scale a cliff and interpret the Bill of Rights.“Look, what we created here may be unique in all of human existence,” Cash tells his children solemnly. “We’ve created paradise.”But there’s the rub. They’ve been living in isolation, so when word comes that their mother has died, things get very complicated. In this engrossing film, the children are an amazing ensemble cast but the adults are stars in their own right, too. Ben’s father in law (Frank Langella) is an upper-class conservative living in a gated community who blames Ben’s communal lifestyle for his daughter’s suicide and forbids them from attending the funeral, sparking rebellion.“We want to see mom!” cries one of the youngest of the Cash clan. “Grandpa can’t oppress us!”And so they set off for the sunny Southwest. They find out quickly they have a lot to learn. At a restaurant, one kid looks at the menu and asks, “What’s cola?” “Poison water,” replies his father with scorn.Later, the eldest child cries out in despair to his dad, “Unless it comes out of a book, I don’t know anything!”But what they do know is quite profound and what we learn from watching it is priceless.Fans of this sleeper hit appreciate that Captain Fantastic is more than a simple road trip. Ross, who went to Julliard and New York University, is perhaps best known as the duplicitous high-tech exec Gavin Belson in HBO’s comedy satire Silicon Valley. In his feature-length directorial debut he tries to walk the line of the great cultural divide that has split the country, culminating in the election of Donald Trump—Chomsky himself a proponent of the “lesser evil voting” strategy of supporting Hillary Clinton. But he doesn’t devolve into stereotypes, although some critics may differ. He’s exploring family values in 21st century America with a refreshing candor that is all too rare.In real life, Ross admits that he does indeed celebrate Noam Chomsky Day in his home in Berkeley, Calif., when he and his kids gather around for sweets and cake, blow out a candle and read a passage or two from Chomsky’s canon that ranges from works on language and mind to American foreign policy and the neoliberal security-surveillance state.Chomsky’s bestseller, Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass Media (1988), co-authored with Edward S. Herman, epitomizes his principled examination of contemporary social issues with a hard-hitting analysis that confronts conventional wisdom without fear or favor.The renowned political theorist, philosopher, activist, scholar and prolific author, who’s published more than 100 works, is regarded as one of the most critically engaging minds alive today. Perhaps then, the Cash children’s incredulity that their grandfather doesn’t honor their family tradition by commemorating Noam Chomsky Day— “I don’t even know who that is!” he tells them—is Ross’ not-so veiled symbolism representing the American public at large, and an urgent plea for us to recognize Chomsky’s insights and embrace them.As a linguist, Chomsky is regarded as revolutionizing the scientific study of language. As an activist, he remains one of the most outspoken critics of U.S. foreign policy and global imperialism—a dissent that has its origins in the country’s involvement during the Vietnam War. A celebrated champion of left-wing politics, Chomsky is also considered one of the most cited authors in all of history.As his inclusion in the International Encyclopedia of Revolution and Protest (2009) states:“Chomsky continues to be an unapologetic critic of both American foreign policy and its ambitions for geopolitical hegemony and the neoliberal turn of global capitalism, which he identifies in terms of class warfare waged from above against the needs and interests of the great majority.”During movie production, Chomsky reportedly told Ross’s team just “please quote me correctly.”That they did. No other American movie in mainstream release has ever referred to Chomsky with as much respect and humor. He may never become a household name—especially in the precincts Trump carried—but celebrating Noam Chomsky Day is a good way to honor his spirit.—With Christopher TwarowskiFeatured photo: Noam Chomsky Day is celebrated in Matt Ross’ indie film Captain Fantastic with cake, candles and quotations from the great American intellectual, social critic, philosopher and M.I.T. professor of linguistics’s many works. (Photo: Noam Chomsky official Facebook profile)last_img read more

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Family judge determined to be ‘unfit’ for office

first_imgIn a statement included in the document, Miller states, “I believe that the draconian sanction of removal of an elected judge is not warranted in this case. I believe censure is appropriate for the established misconduct.” The document detailing the decision has been included below: Following a lawsuit that details Miller to be accused of sexually harassing his court attorney and secretary, the Court of Appeals states Miller’s actions “demonstrated his disregard for his ethical responsibilities.” Viewing on our news app? Click here to view the document. BROOME COUNTY (WBNG) — The New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct has determined Judge Richard H. Miller II to be unfit for judicial office.last_img read more

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EDS Wraps Up Hohe See Onshore Cable Works

first_imgEDS HV Group has completed the onshore installation, termination and testing work of the platform cable on the EnBW Hohe See offshore wind project.Source: EDS HVCarried out on behalf of the Chinese power cable manufacturer Zhongtian Technology Submarine Cable (ZTT), the scope of work covered pre-engineering, including cable routing and design of cable containment and support, and the installation of six 155kV cable circuits plus three shunt reactor neutral connections, as well as termination and subsequent testing.ZTT won a contract by TenneT to supply and construct a 155kV HVAC grid connection between Hohe See and the 900MW BorWin3 DC grid connection system in 2017. At the beginning of this year, the China-based company chose EDS to complete cable termination and testing for the project.EDS is expected to begin the further scope of termination and testing work offshore in the second quarter of 2019.Located some 98km off the German coast, EnBW’s 497MW Hohe See wind farm will feature 71 wind turbines.The offshore wind project is scheduled for commissioning in 2019.last_img read more

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BlueSATH floating turbine prototype ready to take off

first_imgSaitec Offshore Technologies set off the turbine towing operation from Astander’s Dock Pontejos towards the final destination 800 meters away from the Cantabrian coast. According to the company, the already-laid mooring lines were retrieved from the seabed and the platform hook-up was accomplished in less than three hours. The commissioning was then completed and the turbine is ready to operate. The BlueSATH floating wind turbine prototype has been installed and commissioned at its site offshore Santander, Spain. The 1:6 prototype of the BlueSATH (Swinging Around Twin Hull) turbine will operate for a period of 12 months after which it will be completely decommissioned. center_img The main objectives of the project cover the SATH platform validation of its response and dynamic behavior. The aim is to obtain models that allow for structural optimization, enabling cost reduction and validating structural turbine integrity. Obtained results and findings will be applied in the 2 MW DemoSATH full-scale model to be installed on the Basque Marine Energy Platform (BIMEP) next year.last_img read more

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75 Mandurriao households on ‘surgical’ ECQ

first_img* WV Patient 1182 – 15-year-old male * Refrain from unnecessary travel until the COVID-19 testing and sanitation process have been completed. * WV Patient 1180 – four-year-old male Personnel of the City Health Office has been expanding contract tracing since yesterday. They have yet to determine, as of this writing, the source of infection of the 50-year-old patient, who possibly infected the nine others./PN Their results came out the next day, July 18, where nine individuals were found infected – now the neighborhood’s latest cases, Ginsugi added. * The foregoing restriction shall not apply to persons who need immediate hospital care and management  “Isa na sila ka compound,” Treñas revealed during a press briefing yesterday. * WV Patient 1186 – 25-year-old male * WV Patient 1184 – 18-year-old female Treñas said the city government will supply food to every household as well as their other needs. This stringent measure, according to the mayor, aims to stop the virus from spreading. These cases were part of the 50 additional cases that DOH-6 confirmed Wednesday and brought to 1,208 the total cases in Western Visayas. * WV Patient 1187 – 27-year-old male Mayor Jerry Treñas quickly placed 75 households in a neighborhood at the village’s Zone 4 and Zone 5 on a three-day “surgical extreme enhanced community quarantine.” * WV Patient 1188 – 27-year-old female Based on the July 29 data of the Department of Health 6, the Pali Benedicto cases were asymptomatic and currently confined at the city’s quarantine facility. They were the following: * WV Patient 1185 – 60-year-old female He said at least 40 individuals living in the neighborhood had their specimen collected on July 27 as part of the city government’s contact tracing. Mayor Jerry Treñas says he placed Barangay Pali Benedicto in Mandurriao district under stringent lockdown after nine residents contracted coronavirus. IAN PAUL CORDERO/PN * WV Patient 1183 – 12-year-old male * Only Authorized Persons Outside Residence shall be allowed to enter and/or leave the neighborhood, and existing health and safety measures shall be strictly imposed. * WV Patient 1181 – 23-year-old male ILOILO City – Nine residents of Barangay Pali Benedicto in Mandurriao district tested positive for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). * All forms of transportation, both private and public, including the unauthorized movement of person along the street, are restricted. According to Pali Benedicto village chief Alan Juarez Ginsugi, the patients reside in the same compound where a 50-year-old man first tested positive for the viral illness on July 21. In his Executive Order 107 that took effect on July 29, Treñas ordered the household to observe the following:last_img read more

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