Former homeless student turned future Georgetown University grad: ‘Your blessing is there waiting for you’

first_imgWJLA(WASHINGTON) — As she sat in the well-appointed “commuter lounge” of Georgetown University, Rashema Melson drank in her surroundings as she drank an ice cold bottle of mineralized, specialty water.“It’s hot, I’m tired, and my feet hurt,” Melson, 23, said as she waved her hand to cool herself off. She lounged with her feet just shy of the edge of the furniture. “But my feet have survived worst stuff than this, I still walk around barefoot until this day and people look at me like I’m crazy but if they only knew what I’ve been through.”Melson, a born and raised Southeast Washington D.C. native who has lived a majority of her life in either a homeless shelter, public housing, and even an abandoned house at one point, will be the first in her family to graduate from college when she crosses the stage at Georgetown University next Saturday. After attending three different high schools, Melson was the valedictorian of her class at Anacostia High School and earned a full scholarship to college.Next week she will receive her bachelor’s degree in justice and peace studies from Georgetown University something she says she didn’t believe was possible because of the many struggles she has encountered in her life.“My life has always been rough,” Melson said. “Homeless or not, in southeast, it’s rough regardless, the circumstances are just rough due to the fact that we don’t have the tools or resources as everyone else,” she said as she twirled her finger around in a circle pointing at her surroundings on campus – a lush enclave filled with stone buildings and modern amenities.Along with having to constantly change schools, she said she was never able to keep a steady friendship with her classmates or let alone a steady relationship with anyone except her mother and siblings. Her mother was a single mother, Melson and her siblings have different fathers which Melson says are each “either dead or in jail.”“People really emphasizes a lot on the homelessness because that’s what grabbed their attention but there’s a lot that I don’t share,” she says. She explains her time being homeless is like anyone else who has been in a similar situation.At times she slept on a cot shared between her and her siblings waking up to the sting of bed bug bites. She has taken what she describes as “three-minute showers” due to not having hot water. And she ate food straight out of a can with a spoon because there were no plates to eat on.But besides the homelessness, Melson said she has suffered from Bulimia, has caused herself self-harm, and was also a victim of sexual assault something that she is still very hard for her to discuss.“It’s just so much and I think that’s what people don’t understand when you are going through circumstances it’s just not one thing there is A LOT going on,” she says.When she was younger, Melson said that education, along with her love for reading and watching movies, helped her focus.While reading books like the Bailey School Kids books and eventually books by Nora Roberts, Melson said reading other people’s stories while going through her own struggles helped her imagine what her life could be outside of a dark place.“Reading books gave me an insight into a world that I have never ever seen in my life,” she said as her eyes widened. “People really get rich and buy a house? People really get their dream jobs? It was like a fantasy land to me.”Now at 23, a week before graduation, Melson credits her new friends who she describes as life friends for the reason she was able to finish her studies. After freshman year at Georgetown, Melson left for a year to marry her longtime military boyfriend who is now her ex-husband.She ultimately decided to return to Washington D.C and to Georgetown. During this comeback stage of her life, her friends gave her the motivation she needed.“I’ve been complacent before and trying to get your drive back is not easy,” she says. “But Wesley, Dajha, and Terelle have been my core piece, they make me feel normal and I know that after graduation, we will all still be friends and that’s something that I have never said before.”Her friend, Wesley Bowers, 19, said that her experiences have motivated him to work harder and appreciate his opportunities.“She doesn’t ask anyone for anything, she doesn’t ask for much but she is always the first person to give,” said Bowers, who is also majoring in justice and peace studies at Georgetown University and is a linebacker for the school’s football team. “She is just a very caring person and a good friend so finding out her story made her even better in my eyes in a sense.”“I am extremely lucky to have a friend like her, I tell her that all the time,” he said. “I know that if anything happens to me or my family, she will drop whatever she is doing, she always puts other people first.”As for Melson, she really wants people to know there is much more to a person than just being homeless.“People tell me all the time ‘I would’ve never guessed,’ and I say ‘Guess what?’ “Melson explains that people often ask her about being homeless. For Melson, she doesn’t take any offense personally but just wants people to have more of an understanding of what being homeless means.” Oh I didn’t know that you can spot homeless people a mile away!” she says grinning. “How do you know that I am homeless? because am I supposed to look dirty? Am I supposed to stink? What does that mean? It’s not offensive when people do it but you really can’t tell anything from looking at a person.”Melson said her biggest piece of advice for anyone facing adversity is to never give up because everything does eventually get better in time.“Just know that your blessing is there waiting for you, you just have to go get it.”Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Sr. Research Specialist

first_img Maryland, United States Facebook School of Medicine -East Baltimore Campus Laboratory environment –Lab has biological hazards including infectious materials andradioactive materials. Assistance with regulatory compliance foranimal, IBC and Radiation Safety will berequired. Academic Affairs Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore Research Administration Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore While performing theduties of this job, the employee is required to stand and walk upto 85% of the time. Frequently required to traverse throughout thelaboratory; to other work areas on campus. In some areas work spacemay be confined. May be required to climb on step ladder tocomplete some assignments. The employee is required to operatecomputer keyboard, laboratory instruments, and small laboratorytools such as pipettes; as well as able to handle smallanimals. You need to sign in or create an account to save Share Johns Hopkins University You need to sign in or create an account to save LinkedIn Prolonged visionrequirements including viewing computer screen, paperreports/documents, laboratory notes, charts andresults. Similar jobs Salary Not Specified Maryland, United States More searches like this Johns Hopkins University Save Sr. Research Specialist center_img Twitter Sr. Research Specialist Salary Not Specified Apply(This will open in a new window from which you will be automatically redirected to an external site after 5 seconds) GeneralSummary/Purpose:Proficient research and/orclinical laboratory specialist with a sophisticated understandingof techniques and a solid foundation in the underlying science,gained from professional laboratory and research experience. Underminimal supervision, performs clinical and/or research laboratoryexperiments by following established procedures and protocols.Participates in the design of experiments and analyzes data. Worksindependently and manages daily research projects. Assist theprincipal investigator in the development and coordination ofprojects, experimentation, data collection/maintenance, andorganization of the laboratory. Runs lab tests and completesmeasurements as assigned. Identifies and resolves problems and usesanalytical and decision-making skills to implement assignedprojects. Produces and maintains meticulous laboratorynotes/documentation and may contribute to result presentations andmanuscripts.Duties andResponsibilities:Performs research labexperiments to include: 1) basic cellular immunology assaysincluding growing T cells and flow cytometry, 2) routine molecularand cell biology assays, 3) in vivo animal models, and 4) proteinpurification and quality control. Records and reports alllaboratory activities, laboratory notes, and outcomes in a detailedand organized manner.Involved in the dailyoperation of the Schneck Lab which includes working closely withinvestigators to assess their needs and develop protocols to meettheir individual needs.Responsible for trainingof other staff and students.Monitorsbiohazard/radiation safety standards and proper handling ofpotentially hazardous chemical and biological agents and/orradiation sources in the workplace.Responsible for routineoperational activities such as ordering supplies and materials,reviewing inventory, maintaining up to date records of tests, etc.Performs preventative maintenance of equipment. Monitors inventorylevels and proper storage of materials and supplies in accordancewith established policies and procedures.Exchanges routineinformation in an appropriate manner..Reports and recordsoutcomes/results. Does electronic billing entry for work done inlab. EMaintains regularinteraction with students, vendors, post-doctoral fellows, facultymembers, and other clinical fellows.Performs miscellaneousrelated duties as assigned.MinimumQualifications (mandatory):Bachelor’s degree inbiological sciences, chemistry, or relatedfield.4 years related clinicaland/or research laboratory experience performing relevant orrelated techniques. Advanced knowledge of goodlab practices required.Master’s degree, withrelated graduate research, may substitute for experience to theextent permitted by the JHU equivalency formula.PreferredQualifications:Master’s degree highlydesired.Previous work experiencewith mouse models, cellular immunology and/or cell biologylab.Special Knowledge,Skills, and Abilities:Good oral and writtencommunication.Work independently, underminimal supervision with strong decision-making skills and goodjudgment.Handle and experimentallyinject mice, gavage mice, collect samples and ear-notchingetc.Advanced organizationalskills a must.Excellent record keepingand documentation skills, required.Equipment,Machine, or Tool Requirements:Computer and Laboratoryequipment. Operates and maintains lab equipment such as HPLC andFlow cytometer.Work Environment /Whileperforming the duties of this job:Work will require physicalwork, including a lot of time standing, walking, climbing, bendingand reaching. Daily tasks include lifting (40+lbs). Administrative Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore Salary Not Specified You need to sign in or create an account to save Johns Hopkins University The successful candidate(s) for this position will be subject to apre-employment background check.If you are interested in applying for employment with The JohnsHopkins University and require special assistance or accommodationduring any part of the pre-employment process, please contact theHR Business Services Office at [email protected] For TTYusers, call via Maryland Relay or dial 711.The following additional provisions may apply depending on whichcampus you will work. Your recruiter will adviseaccordingly.During the Influenza (“the flu”) season, as a condition ofemployment, The Johns Hopkins Institutions require all employeeswho provide ongoing services to patients or work in patient care orclinical care areas to have an annual influenza vaccination orpossess an approved medical or religious exception. Failure to meetthis requirement may result in termination of employment.The pre-employment physical for positions in clinical areas,laboratories, working with research subjects, or involvingcommunity contact requires documentation of immune status againstRubella (German measles), Rubeola (Measles), Mumps, Varicella(chickenpox), Hepatitis B and documentation of having received theTdap (Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) vaccination. This may includedocumentation of having two (2) MMR vaccines; two (2) Varicellavaccines; or antibody status to these diseases from laboratorytesting. Blood tests for immunities to these diseases areordinarily included in the pre-employment physical exam except forthose employees who provide results of blood tests or immunizationdocumentation from their own health care providers. Anyvaccinations required for these diseases will be given at no costin our Occupational Health office.Equal Opportunity EmployerNote: Job Postings are updated daily and remain online untilfilled.EEO is the LawLearn more:https://www1.eeoc.gov/employers/upload/eeoc_self_print_poster.pdfImportant legal informationhttp://hrnt.jhu.edu/legal.cfm Sr. Research Specialist II Save Sr. Research Specialist II Staff may be required tocomplete annual competency review, and must insure compliance withJohns Hopkins Policy, Laboratory Policy & Procedure, Health,Safety & Environment regulations, and all applicable privacy& confidentiality laws/practices.Schedules willinclude expected weekend work and/or holiday assignment to check onmice. Required to report in the event of inclement weatheror other emergency to check/care for mice.Classified Title: Sr.Research SpecialistWorking Title: Sr. Research Specialist ​​​​​Role/Level/Range: ACRP/04/MCStarting Salary Range: $45,195-$62,225 (commensurate withexperience)Employee group: Full TimeSchedule: M-F 8:30a-5:00pExempt Status: ExemptLocation: 04-MD:School of Medicine CampusDepartment name: 10003053-SOM Pat ImmunologyPersonnel area: School of MedicineThe successfulcandidate(s) for this position will be subject to a pre-employmentbackground check.If you are interested inapplying for employment with The Johns Hopkins University andrequire special assistance or accommodation during any part of thepre-employment process, please contact the HR Business ServicesOffice [email protected] For TTY users, call via MarylandRelay or dial 711.The followingadditional provisions may apply depending on which campus you willwork. Your recruiter will adviseaccordingly.During the Influenza (“theflu”) season, as a condition of employment, The Johns HopkinsInstitutions require all employees who provide ongoing services topatients or work in patient care or clinical care areas to have anannual influenza vaccination or possess an approved medical orreligious exception. Failure to meet this requirement may result intermination of employment.The pre-employmentphysical for positions in clinical areas, laboratories, workingwith research subjects, or involving community contact requiresdocumentation of immune status against Rubella (German measles),Rubeola (Measles), Mumps, Varicella (chickenpox), Hepatitis B anddocumentation of having received the Tdap (Tetanus, diphtheria,pertussis) vaccination. This may include documentation of havingtwo (2) MMR vaccines; two (2) Varicella vaccines; or antibodystatus to these diseases from laboratory testing. Blood tests forimmunities to these diseases are ordinarily included in thepre-employment physical exam except for those employees who provideresults of blood tests or immunization documentation from their ownhealth care providers. Any vaccinations required for these diseaseswill be given at no cost in our Occupational Healthoffice.Equal OpportunityEmployerNote: Job Postings are updated daily and remain online untilfilled.EEO is theLawLearn more:https://www.eeoc.gov/sites/default/files/migrated_files/employers/poster_screen_reader_optimized.pdf Maryland, United States Sr. Research Specialist Save Sr. Research Specialist Exposure to toxins andinfectious agents exist, but potential for personal injury or harmis minimized if established safety and health precautions arefollowed. Must refer to and are expected to comply with properlaboratory protocols and safety policy/procedures, and be familiarwith material data safety sheets in assigned work areas. Working inlaboratory where there may be discomforts due to odors, noise,temperature fluctuations, and working around lab equipment. Use ofpersonal protective equipment may be advised orrequired.last_img read more

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Legette, Peggy J., 65 of Egg Harbor Township, NJ

first_imgLegette, Peggy J., 65 of Egg Harbor Township, NJ, formerly of Somers Point, NJ and Ocean City, NJ passed away on Tuesday, October 4, 2016 at AtlantiCare Regional Medical Center in Atlantic City, NJ.Mrs. Legette was born in Marion, SC and had worked as a Salesperson for Lenox Glass in Pomona, NJ. She was a member of Shiloh Baptist Church in Ocean City, NJ.She was predeceased by her parents, Morgan and Christiana (Kirton) Fogan and her husband Maxie Legette, Sr.Surviving are three sons, Maxie Legette, Jr. (Terry) of Egg Harbor Township, NJ, Ronald D. Legette of Pleasantville, NJ, Duane L. Legette of Somers Point, NJ, two daughters, Yulvonko Legette (Celest Scott) of Pleasantville, NJ, Latosha Legette (Melissa) of Pleasantville, NJ, 12 grandchildren, 10 great grandchildren and a brother, Leon Kirton of Myrtle Beach, SC.Her Funeral Service will be offered Wednesday morning at 11 o’clock from St. Peter’s United Methodist Church, 8th Street at Central Avenue, Ocean City, NJ where friends may call from ten o’clock until the time of service. Burial will follow in Seaside Cemetery, Palermo, NJ.Memorial contributions in her memory may be made to Shiloh Baptist Church, 7th Street at Simpson Avenue, Ocean City, NJ 08226.For condolences to the family, visit www.godfreyfuneralhome.com.last_img read more

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Pandemic threatens to veer out of control in U.S., public health experts say

first_img Cellphone data shows Americans moving around at near pre-pandemic rates “We should be wanting to be able to open schools, and schools should have a higher priority, arguably, than other parts of the economy,” Hanage said. “What those [other parts of the economy to reopen] are, ought to be debated. … What we should be thinking about in reopening is not reopening everything in a safe way, but which things we want to reopen and being able to do that without enhancing community transmission.”Even well-honed strategies will fail if citizens are noncompliant, however, Bloom said. In New York City, contact tracing programs have run into people not answering phones or refusing to isolate after hearing they’ve been exposed to infection.“If people are ignoring the epidemic, it’s going to be very hard to control,” Bloom said, “and leadership should be inspiring people to be more cautions.” “When political leaders wait until it gets really bad, that’s where we are now,” Bloom said. “If you only look at what you see today, you’re three weeks behind the curve. … It’s trying to imagine what will be three weeks from now — rather than what you see today — that should be determining policy.”Hanage said he understands political leaders’ reluctance to reimpose lockdowns, but with few tools to fight the coronavirus and more moderate steps like masking and hand-washing most effective when numbers are also more moderate, a shutdown may turn out to be what’s needed.“Let me be clear: I do not like shutdowns. But if they’re the only thing to prevent a worse catastrophe, you have to use them,” Hanage said.A bright spot in the current epidemic is that the age of those contracting COVID-19 appears to be declining. Hanage said that he didn’t view it as a sign of the epidemic evolving, but rather a marker of testing being more widespread and catching more cases than during the March-April spike. Though younger people have better survival rates, that good news is tempered by the fact that we’ve been largely ineffective at keeping the virus away from those most susceptible for severe illness: the elderly and people with pre-existing conditions. But that may nonetheless mean there is a window of opportunity to suppress the epidemic before it takes hold among those more vulnerable populations. “Let me be clear: I do not like shutdowns. But if they’re the only thing to prevent a worse catastrophe, you have to use them.” — William Hanage, Harvard Chan School Harvard’s Summers says national pandemic response lacking Lockdown? What lockdown? “If there is a window of action, it’s now,” Hanage said.Hanage struck a similar note on lower death rates in the current spike, saying deaths lag behind cases, so we should wait for a few weeks before concluding that anything different is going on.Bloom said the difference between the U.S. and nations where the pandemic appears to be controlled is that those countries had uniform national policies and didn’t lift lockdowns until case numbers were very low. The fact that some of them have experienced new outbreaks — like the recent spate of cases in Beijing — is to be expected. Once the local epidemic is controlled, easing the lockdown will inevitably lead to new cases. The strategy then is to use testing to quickly identify cases and use contact tracing and isolation to contain outbreaks before they become widespread. In a state like California, with 7,000 new cases reported Tuesday, tracing the contacts of each positive test becomes a monumental task.Rather than flinging the doors wide, the two said reopening should more closely resemble refining the shutdown, letting some things resume with safeguards in place that can be tightened should cases rise. Leaders should consider risk versus value to society in deciding what to reopen and when. For instance, bars, casinos, and churches, where people are crammed together and which have been shown to be hotspots of infection in some instances, may need to stay closed in order to keep the overall infection rate in the community low enough that we can safely reopen places with broad societal benefit, Bloom and Hanage said. Related The risks of ‘not trying enough’ against COVID-19 Experts are thinking through the options as a jump is possible in fall This is part of our Coronavirus Update series in which Harvard specialists in epidemiology, infectious disease, economics, politics, and other disciplines offer insights into what the latest developments in the COVID-19 outbreak may bring.Harvard public health experts said the nation’s COVID-19 epidemic is getting “quite out of hand” and that, with cases rising rapidly in the hardest-hit states and a two-week lag between infection and hospitalization, the situation appears set to worsen quickly.“I have this awful feeling of déjà vu, like it’s March all over again,” said William Hanage, associate professor of epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.Hanage, who spoke with reporters during a conference call Thursday morning, said that hospitals are nearing capacity in Arizona and Houston and are likely to be stressed elsewhere soon. And, in contrast to the nation’s early spike in COVID-19 cases that were concentrated in a few states, the current surge is much more widespread and so has greater potential to take off.“The increases that we’re seeing right now have the capacity to cause far more disease in the future,” Hanage said.Barry Bloom, the Joan L. and Julius H. Jacobson Research Professor of Public Health, who also fielded reporters’ questions Thursday, said other countries have shown that the epidemic can be contained by acting swiftly when cases appear. Even Italy, once on the verge of health system collapse, has regained control of its epidemic, Bloom said. Italy on Tuesday reported just 113 new cases and 18 deaths. “If you only look at what you see today, you’re three weeks behind the curve. … It’s trying to imagine what will be three weeks from now … that should be determining policy.” — Barry Bloom, Harvard Chan School Finding COVID clues in movement Americans are weary of lockdowns, but if COVID surges, what then? Tracking mobility of individuals offers hints of whether a problem is rising or falling last_img read more

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Leaf Spot Disease

first_imgGeorgia peanut growers are experiencing problematic leaf spot diseases this year due to susceptible varieties and weakening fungicide treatments, according to Albert Culbreath and Tim Brenneman, plant pathologists at the University of Georgia Tifton Campus.Brenneman said this year’s dry conditions should have set up an environment that’s less favorable for leaf spot.“It displays the magnitude of the problem,” Brenneman said. “If we’re having trouble in a dry year, we could really have a serious problem in a wetter year.”According to the 2014 Georgia farm gate report, peanuts are the sixth-highest grossing commodity in Georgia, bringing in nearly $564 million for growers. Nine of the top 10 peanut-producing counties are in the southwest part of the state.Brenneman said that leaf spot could hurt overall peanut yields in some places this year, but that the dry conditions will be the biggest factor.“The irrigated crop is not bad,” Brenneman said. “Some dryland areas are horrendous and have been zeroed out for insurance already. The earlier United States Department of Agriculture crop estimate predicted very high yields for Georgia, but as the crop has been coming in, it looks like that projection was optimistic.”Almost all varieties grown in Georgia, Alabama and north Florida are susceptible to leaf spot, including Georgia-06G, Georgia’s most commonly produced variety, according to the UGA Peanut Team.“Growers must be aware of their cultivar selection,” said Brenneman. “Some of the high-oleic peanuts are especially susceptible to leaf spot. Certain buyers are willing to pay a premium for growing those cultivars with that oil chemistry since the products made from them have a better shelf life. Growers must realize that if they choose to grow those varieties, they must stay on top of their spray programs and not cut any corners.”Leaf spot produces hormonal changes in the plant, which causes the leaves to wither, turn yellow and fall off the plant. It also causes lesions to appear on the stem and other parts of the plant.Culbreath and Brenneman are working to combat leaf spot in the short and long terms. Culbreath said that improving fungicide efficacy is his short-term solution for stopping the disease. He said mixing the less effective fungicides has been more effective than spraying them separately.“We’re working with experimental fungicides with multiple companies,” Culbreath said. “Some of the experimental fungicides are much more effective than what we have now and represent a lower risk in terms of applicator and environmental exposure. They’re still going to be expensive, but fungicides are a very important part of our leaf spot management program.”Culbreath said his long-term goal for leaf spot is to help develop varieties that are resistant to the disease. He has been working with several breeders and geneticists with UGA, the USDA and the University of Florida to help develop the new varieties and improve techniques for selection that should help with that process.“We’re helping determine the relative resistance levels in hundreds of peanut lines from multiple mapping populations. In most cases, this is being done with huge field trials. The levels of resistance in those lines are matched with gene sequences from the respective lines to determine which genes or gene groups are responsible for the resistance,” Culbreath said. “Hopefully, with that information, the geneticists can develop molecular markers for those genes that a breeder can use to screen a lot of lines quickly for resistance. Hopefully, we will find multiple types of resistance and will be able to use the markers to combine multiple types of resistance into one variety.”Culbreath said that part of the challenge in evaluating a peanut field is the large number of plots that must be rated. Sarah Beth Pelham, a master’s degree student at UGA, has been using a drone to see whether aerial imagery can evaluate the severity of leaf spot damage.Without the use of fungicide treatments, Culbreath said peanut varieties must be resistant to leaf spot diseases in order to thrive in south Georgia.Culbreath has also been working on improving leaf spot control in organic peanut production, which involves no synthetic pesticides or fertilizers.“Brian Jordan, another graduate student in our program, has much of his research focused on organic production. Brian has found that several advanced breeding lines from University of Georgia peanut breeder Bill Branch, as well as Dr. Branch’s released cultivar Georgia-12Y, have the potential to do well without fungicides for leaf spot control when used with good rotation and early planting dates to dodge the epidemic,” Culbreath said. “Resistance or tolerance and crop rotation is essential for that type of production, but I think we can put together an integrated system that will work for organic production.”last_img read more

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E.ON to build major wind farm in Sweden

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享CNBC:German utility E.ON is to build what it describes as one of Europe’s “largest onshore wind farms.”In an announcement Friday, the business said it had decided to invest in the 475-megawatt Nysater wind project in Sweden. The facility will be built jointly with Credit Suisse Energy Infrastructure Partners (CSEIP).E.ON is to build and operate the project through a “long-term” operations and maintenance agreement, and will retain a 20 percent equity stake in the development. Total investment comes to approximately 500 million euros ($566.4 million).“It is part of our strategy to expand our position for onshore wind energy in Europe,” Anja-Isabel Dotzenrath, CEO of E.ON Climate and Renewables, said in a statement. “Nysater means a significant expansion of our Scandinavian portfolio,” Dotzenrath added.E.ON said its new project is situated in the Vasternorrland district of Sweden, an area the company described as having “excellent wind conditions.” Construction is slated to begin this year and it’s expected the facility will be finished by the end of 2021. It will use 114 turbines from Nordex, a German manufacturer.More: E.ON announces plans to build large onshore wind farm in Sweden E.ON to build major wind farm in Swedenlast_img read more

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Rising consumer confidence raises spending, auto lending

first_imgRavaged by a weak job market, falling home prices, and tighter credit standards, U.S. consumers reigned in their spending in recent years. But after seven years of penny-pinching and coupon clipping, they are spending and borrowing again. Many are beginning home improvements, buying new homes and autos, or financing their children’s educations. What is driving the rosier outlook? Consumer confidence reached 101.5 percent in August 2015. Strong job growth and improved business conditions are also fueling consumer spending.Rising Confidence, Increased SpendingAs consumer expectations and spending increase, so does borrowing. Credit inquiries increased by three million, to 176 million, in just six months. Total household indebtedness reached $11.85 trillion, a 2 percent increase over the prior quarter.Consumer Borrowing—Led by Automotive—Is Heating UpSince the recession, both card and mortgage underwriting has remained relatively tight; however, mortgage originations have risen $97 billion to $466 billion since the previous quarter. Credit card accounts rose by five million, the largest increase since 2008, to 411 million. Auto loan originations reached $119 billion in August, a 10-year high. continue reading » 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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4 steps to engineering a great culture

first_img continue reading » The credit union industry is dominated by logical thinking, tight adherence to processes, and extensive regulatory oversight. By comparison, the task of creating a world-class culture is often mis­perceived as a squishy, lovey-dovey, emotional thing. That perception is flat-out incorrect.Building a great culture requires every bit as much structure, measurement and refinement as any operational process. As a result, a culture can literally be “engineered” and executed in a predictable, high quality way. Note that because you are working to craft a sense of shared purpose and values, engineering a culture does take longer than most other organizational changes.Here are four key steps to take:Start at the top. Before you even begin with questions about mission, vision, and values, you need to be certain that you have senior executive team buy-in. Employees look to senior leadership for cues on what is valued. If there is any lack of stamina at the leadership level for sustaining the cultural change you seek to accomplish, you will fail. 19SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Teams hold practice games as Japan baseball league nears return

first_imgKyodo News reported that the Buffaloes allowed reporters into the stadium after requiring them to wear face masks and undergo temperature checks.With the number of coronavirus infections falling across Japan, the state of emergency was lifted in Osaka, along with two other western prefectures, last Thursday. The measures had already been lifted in Fukuoka.Japan will lift a state of emergency for Tokyo and remaining areas still facing restrictions on Monday.The COVID-19 pandemic also forced Olympic organisers to postpone the 2020 Tokyo Games by a year.Topics : Two Japanese teams held intra-squad practice games in empty ballparks on Monday as the Nippon Professional Baseball league nears a return from the COVID-19 shutdown.The NPB season was supposed to start on March 20 but has been delayed due to the pandemic. Earlier this month, NPB Commissioner Atsushi Saito suggested the season could start in the second half of June.The Osaka-based Orix Buffaloes and the SoftBank Hawks, who play further south in Fukuoka, both held intra-squad scrimmages at their grounds on Monday.last_img read more

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Cheap colour test picks up HIV

first_img Share Blue for yes, red for noA cheap test which could detect even low levels of viruses and some cancers has been developed by UK researchers. The colour of a liquid changes to give either a positive or negative result.The designers from Imperial College London say the device could lead to more widespread testing for HIV and other diseases in parts of the world where other methods are unaffordable.The prototype, which needs wider testing, is described in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.The test can be configured to a unique signature of a disease or virus – such as a protein found on the surface of HIV.If that marker is present it changes the course of a chemical reaction. The final result is blue if the marker is there, red if the marker is not.The researchers say this allows the results to be detected with “the naked eye”.Prof Molly Stevens told the BBC: “This method should be used when the presence of a target molecule at ultra-low concentration could improve the diagnosis of disease. “For example, it is important to detect some molecules at ultra-low concentrations to test cancer recurrence after tumour removal. “It can also help with diagnosing HIV-infected patients whose viral load is too low to be detected with current methods.”Early testing showed the presence of markers of HIV and prostate cancer could be detected. However, trials on a much larger scale will be needed before it could be used clinically.The researchers expect their design will cost 10 times less than current tests. They say this will be important in countries where the only options are unaffordable.Fellow researcher Dr Roberto de la Rica said: “This test could be significantly cheaper to administer, which could pave the way for more widespread use of HIV testing in poorer parts of the world.”BBC News Share Sharing is caring! Tweetcenter_img Share HealthLifestyle Cheap colour test picks up HIV by: – October 30, 2012 13 Views   no discussionslast_img read more

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